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August 13, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Faced with a nationwide rebellion and signs of crumbling support among the military rank and file, retired Gen. Sein Lwin resigned Friday as Burma's president and ruling party leader. The 64-year-old protege of former Burmese strongman Ne Win surrendered his posts just 17 days after taking power and five days after massive and bloody demonstrations began in Rangoon, the capital. The resignation was announced Friday night by official Rangoon Radio.
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NEWS
August 15, 1988
Protest leaders in Burma, who staged anti-government demonstrations last week that led to the resignation of hard-line ruler Sein Lwin, called for elections for a democratic government within six months. Although the capital of Rangoon was reported calm, Western diplomats said that as many as 10,000 protesters marched near the Rangoon River, and leaflets calling for more demonstrations were seen throughout the city.
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NEWS
August 15, 1988
Protest leaders in Burma, who staged anti-government demonstrations last week that led to the resignation of hard-line ruler Sein Lwin, called for elections for a democratic government within six months. Although the capital of Rangoon was reported calm, Western diplomats said that as many as 10,000 protesters marched near the Rangoon River, and leaflets calling for more demonstrations were seen throughout the city.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The streets of Rangoon, gripped by violence for the past week, filled Saturday with celebrating Burmese who had driven a brutal president from power. Shops reopened, street barricades were cleared and people banged cooking pots to signal their relief that the protests had ended. "The city is returning to a semblance of order," a Rangoon-based diplomat said. "Buses are moving again. People are on the streets downtown."
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | From Reuters
Sein Lwin, the tough former brigadier general responsible for suppressing opposition in Burma since the 1962 military takeover, was named ruling party leader Tuesday to replace Ne Win, who had run the country since the coup. Sein Lwin, probably the most unpopular official in Burma after he led riot police in crushing student-led demonstrations that erupted in March, was elected chairman of the Burma Socialist Program Party by its Central Committee, state radio said.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | from Times Wire Services
Burmese President Sein Lwin, the hard-line socialist and brutal authoritarian who took power 17 days ago, resigned Friday in the wake of a 5-day uprising that diplomats say left hundreds of people dead. His resignation, announced in a two-paragraph statement on official Rangoon Radio, was an apparent victory for protesters who staged four days of massive demonstrations demanding his ouster as leader of the Southeast Asian nation of nearly 40 million people.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The streets of Rangoon, gripped by violence for the past week, filled Saturday with celebrating Burmese who had driven a brutal president from power. Shops reopened, street barricades were cleared and people banged cooking pots to signal their relief that the protests had ended. "The city is returning to a semblance of order," a Rangoon-based diplomat said. "Buses are moving again. People are on the streets downtown."
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., Times Staff Writer
Faced with a nationwide rebellion and signs of crumbling support among the military rank and file, former Gen. Sein Lwin resigned today as Burma's president and ruling party leader. The 64-year-old protege of Burmese strongman Ne Win surrendered his posts just 17 days after assuming power. His election brought on immediate street demonstrations that escalated into massive and bloody protests in Rangoon, the capital, and across the country.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Burma's new president, hard-liner Sein Lwin, declared martial law in the capital after thousands of masked students marched through downtown Rangoon on Wednesday in a continuation of protests against his assumption of power. Rangoon Radio, monitored in Bangkok, said a state of emergency and martial law was imposed after seven days of scattered anti-government demonstrations, culminating in the march by hundreds of people through the capital Wednesday.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Tens of thousands of Burmese marched in the capital of Rangoon and more than a dozen other cities Monday to protest the government of President Sein Lwin, diplomats and media reports said. At least eight people were killed. Rangoon radio, monitored in Bangkok, reported "mass demonstrations" in areas ranging from Moulmein on the southern coast to Taunggyi in the wild, mountainous area of the Shan states.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | from Times Wire Services
Burmese President Sein Lwin, the hard-line socialist and brutal authoritarian who took power 17 days ago, resigned Friday in the wake of a 5-day uprising that diplomats say left hundreds of people dead. His resignation, announced in a two-paragraph statement on official Rangoon Radio, was an apparent victory for protesters who staged four days of massive demonstrations demanding his ouster as leader of the Southeast Asian nation of nearly 40 million people.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Faced with a nationwide rebellion and signs of crumbling support among the military rank and file, retired Gen. Sein Lwin resigned Friday as Burma's president and ruling party leader. The 64-year-old protege of former Burmese strongman Ne Win surrendered his posts just 17 days after taking power and five days after massive and bloody demonstrations began in Rangoon, the capital. The resignation was announced Friday night by official Rangoon Radio.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The United States, which in the past has given limited support to the government of Burma as part of the American campaign against illegal drugs, took steps Thursday to distance itself from the regime of military leader Sein Lwin in the midst of its bloody suppression of anti-government protests. A State Department spokesman said the situation in Burma is "very fluid," with the outcome uncertain, and the United States issued a new warning against travel to Burma. Meanwhile, U.S.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., Times Staff Writer
Faced with a nationwide rebellion and signs of crumbling support among the military rank and file, former Gen. Sein Lwin resigned today as Burma's president and ruling party leader. The 64-year-old protege of Burmese strongman Ne Win surrendered his posts just 17 days after assuming power. His election brought on immediate street demonstrations that escalated into massive and bloody protests in Rangoon, the capital, and across the country.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Killings and arson swept Burma on Wednesday as anti-government protests raged for a third day. Official Radio Rangoon announced that 33 people were killed and 59 were wounded Wednesday in clashes between security forces and demonstrators and that three police officers were beheaded in suburban Rangoon. The official three-day casualty toll is now 78 dead, although estimates by diplomatic sources in the capital are at least double that number.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Tens of thousands of Burmese marched in the capital of Rangoon and more than a dozen other cities Monday to protest the government of President Sein Lwin, diplomats and media reports said. At least eight people were killed. Rangoon radio, monitored in Bangkok, reported "mass demonstrations" in areas ranging from Moulmein on the southern coast to Taunggyi in the wild, mountainous area of the Shan states.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Burma's new president, hard-liner Sein Lwin, declared martial law in the capital after thousands of masked students marched through downtown Rangoon on Wednesday in a continuation of protests against his assumption of power. Rangoon Radio, monitored in Bangkok, said a state of emergency and martial law was imposed after seven days of scattered anti-government demonstrations, culminating in the march by hundreds of people through the capital Wednesday.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
A brief announcement by Burma's official radio has drawn tight the curtain of repression, shutting out what less than two weeks ago had seemed a glimmer of reform. The broadcast, monitored here Monday in neighboring Thailand, said that seven former Burmese military officers and three civilians have been arrested as "a preventive measure to protect the state."
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