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TRAVEL
August 1, 1993
The article "Jewel of the Normandy Coast" (July 18), otherwise fascinating, has two errors: 1. "Overlooking the Seine's headwaters . . . " The Seine's headwaters "arise in the Cote d'Or (southeast of Paris), on the Langres plateau, 471 meters high." (Reference: Dictionnaire Geographique de la France.) 2. "The Greniers a Sel . . . built in 1670 to store tax revenues . . . which at the time were collected in salt." The farmers paid a price for the right to sell the salt, and in some areas people were required to buy more than they needed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
July 15, 2011 | By Rosemary McClure, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Megan Cowles' friends envy her good luck. "Everyone wants my job," she says. This summer, her employer is taking her to Paris, where she'll see the Eiffel Tower, stroll along the Seine and eat buttery, melt-in-your-mouth croissants for breakfast. Her wonder job? She's a home-care worker. Her employer, a 76-year-old Orange County woman, is so grateful for her help that she's taking her to Paris on a vacation. Part 1: How to choose a caregiver "She's very excited about it," Cowles said.
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OPINION
June 21, 1987 | David Glidden, David Glidden is a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Riverside
At the time it seemed a form of courtesy, to let the homeless have their bridges and their benches, even to contribute a little money for their thirst. Otherwise they were left alone, as independent spirits. But they were also left to die, to perish with the same indifference that sustained them. During the summer solstice, this longest day of the year, the sun rises while the city is still dormant. But one long ago longest day I found dreaming difficult, so I walked around Paris streets at 4 a.
WORLD
September 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A 6-year-old boy and a man have died after they were trapped in a tourist boat that sank on the River Seine in a rare accident in the heart of Paris, police said. The accident took place Saturday night at the Pont de l'Archeveche, a bridge that connects the tip of the Ile de la Cite to the Left Bank. Ten passengers jumped into the river. The boat's captain and co-captain were being questioned.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | From Times wire services
The city of Paris launched its first "river-bus" service on the Seine in more than 50 years today, one of a series of steps to ease the capital's traffic jams. The first of nine river-buses that will shuttle daily along the Seine sailed from the foot of the Eiffel Tower headed for its up-river terminus at Town Hall. The boats, scheduled to run every 45 minutes with up to 150 people on board, will stop at three newly built docks on the way: at the Musee d'Orsay, the Louvre and Notre Dame Cathedral.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Was there a cover-up? Was someone stonewalling? These were the burning questions in the French capital last week. The answers to both were clearly "Yes." Did this mean that President Francois Mitterrand would be forced to resign? The answer to that seemed to be clearly "No," for although he was incontrovertibly involved, he had done all the right things to gain credit and avoid blame. There were some who felt all this had to do with something called Greenpeace.
BOOKS
August 7, 1994 | Christopher Dickey, Christopher Dickey is the Middle East editor for Newsweek. He lives in Paris
August in Paris is the month of the Americans. The avenues are wide open, the parks are full of shaded romantic corners, and while most of the French have followed each other to the sea like lemmings, just enough remain to keep open the critical mass of cafes. Americans love this season because without the hard-to-take Parisians, the city is so easy, "so lush and accessible, so graceful and finished, loaded with lore," as the narrator of Ward Just's new novel tells us.
TRAVEL
July 12, 1987 | LESLIE GOURSE, Gourse is a New York City free-lance writer.
A man on a motorcycle raced into the intersection of five Left Bank streets near Paris' Latin Quarter on a weekend night. His motor roared while his tape deck played: "Hi dee hi dee hi dee ho . . . . " Cab Calloway sang out clearly enough to amuse the nighttime cafe sitters, terrace diners and strollers in the narrow lanes. "Hi dee hi dee . . . . " And the motorcycle roared away.
HOME & GARDEN
July 15, 2011 | By Rosemary McClure, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Megan Cowles' friends envy her good luck. "Everyone wants my job," she says. This summer, her employer is taking her to Paris, where she'll see the Eiffel Tower, stroll along the Seine and eat buttery, melt-in-your-mouth croissants for breakfast. Her wonder job? She's a home-care worker. Her employer, a 76-year-old Orange County woman, is so grateful for her help that she's taking her to Paris on a vacation. Part 1: How to choose a caregiver "She's very excited about it," Cowles said.
MAGAZINE
June 29, 1986 | WILLIAM WHARTON
The Statue of Liberty, meticulously patched and fitted with a new flame, turns 100 this week. Through the years, the statue has been transformed from a symbol of fraternity between France and the United States into the pre-eminent symbol of freedom, a beacon for millions of immigrants and a patriotic symbol of unrivaled emotional intensity. It has inspired poetry and song, speechmaking and caricature.
NEWS
November 10, 2005 | Leslie Brenner, Times Staff Writer
SQUINT, and you'd think you were in France. Now open a little wider. Provencal tablecloths cover the tables in the narrow little Bistro de l'Hermitage; bottles of wine line one side of the bar; specials are scrawled on a chalkboard. Likely as not, the waiter will address you in French. The place is packed with a lively, chattering crowd, young people and older folks, French expats here and there, everyone elbow-to-elbow, drinking wine, digging into smoked trout salad or roast chicken.
TRAVEL
October 19, 2003 | Pamela Druckerman, Special to The Times
When I heard drumming in the distance at the Parc de la Villette, I practically broke into a run. This patch of park in northern Paris, where Africans and Caribbean Frenchmen turn up on Sunday afternoons to play their homeland music, seemed to offer a taste of the immigrant city I'd been looking for. Paris isn't quite the place you'd expect anymore.
TRAVEL
July 20, 2003 | Gayle Keck, Special to The Times
Imagine paying a visit to the Eiffel Tower, then a few minutes later stretching out on the sand to work on your tan. In times past, all of Paris went to the beach in August. Now the beach comes to Paris. In a grand experiment, Mayor Bertrand Delanoe last year launched "Paris Plage" (Paris Beach), a two-mile strand that stretched along the banks of the Seine River, co-opting quays and roadways for the pleasure of sunbathers, strollers and skaters.
BOOKS
December 22, 2002 | Victor Brombert, Victor Brombert is the author of "Trains of Thought: Memories of a Stateless Youth."
Seven Ages of Paris Alistair Horne Alfred A. Knopf: 436 pp., $35 * That Paris would grow into the capital of a kingdom stretching from the Pyrenees to the Rhine was not a given. But the tiny Roman colony established on a fluvial island in a bend of the Seine did, from the start, offer several key assets: a mild climate, a navigable waterway propitious to the development of major commerce, two river arms providing natural protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2000 | DAVID LANSING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When I was 22 and living in Paris, I often spent my mornings at a rowdy little cafe, Chez George, near my apartment in the Latin Quarter just down the street from the Luxembourg Gardens. Chez George late at night was a favorite haunt of buskers and musicians, a cacophony of earnest voices speaking rapidly in a dozen languages mixed with guitar music and singing, where the air was thick with the blue haze of Gitanes. It was overwhelming to me, and I seldom went there. At least not in the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | BRIAN LOWERY
While not the sort of anniversary NBC is likely to celebrate, Wednesday marks one year since Jerry Seinfeld plopped a lump of coal in the network's Christmas stocking, informing NBC brass that his top-rated sitcom, "Seinfeld," would finish its epic run that spring. Some might trace NBC's current ratings woes--including a 16% decline in its audience this fall--directly to fallout from Seinfeld's bombshell.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | TIA GINDICK, Gindick, a former Times staff writer, recently returned home after spending a year traveling in Europe and delighting in Paris
We always returned to it no matter who we were or how it was changed or with what difficulties or ease it could be reached. Paris was always worth it. . . . --Ernest Hemingway, "A Moveable Feast" Americans--grinning, blunt, friendly Americans--have always come to Paris. Or have wanted to. It was probably Hemingway who started it, he and that whole scene known as the Lost Generation.
TRAVEL
May 10, 1987 | JENNIFER MERIN, Merin is a New York free-lance writer.
French cuisine, generally celebrated as the finest and most exquisite dining in the world, can be experienced in the hundreds of marvelous little bistros and elegant restaurants that give the City of Lights its unmistakable flavor and unquestionably good taste. Parisian gourmet groceries offer a rich variety of French foods, with which tourists may continue their enjoyment of Parisian dining at home.
BOOKS
November 29, 1998 | WILLIAM H. GASS, William H. Gass is director of the International Writers Center at Washington University, St. Louis. His most recent book is "Cartesian Sonata."
When the Seine leaves Paris for the Channel, it makes several large loops while being forced by physics to skirt high ground. The first of these "bays" contains the hills of the Seine, low waves across a crescent-shaped region upon which the suburbs have intruded, but where large forests still remain, and also an area that shelters an airfield frequently bombed during World War II, so that craters can be seen on its many wooded walks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1998 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The end is coming soon, but you needn't face it alone. Indeed, at least nine Orange County establishments will throw parties for Thursday's "Seinfeld" finale. So if the thought of saying farewell in isolation is unbearable, pop in to one of the following establishments--all equipped with big-screen TVs--for a Big Salad, marble rye, trivia and look-alike contests, soup served soup-Nazi style and most likely a horde of other fans.
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