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Seine River

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NEWS
March 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
A small car with 10 youths ages 14 to 17 jammed inside fell into the Seine River early Sunday in the town of St. Mammes, and five of the passengers drowned, police said. The automobile was being driven down a riverside street at about 4 a.m. in the town 45 miles southeast of Paris when it went into the river, police said.
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TRAVEL
January 27, 2002
The Geo Quiz is fun and interesting; it is something we do religiously every Sunday. However, when we wanted to see exactly where the Bay of Fundy was, we were at a loss. All you gave us was the "Atlantic Ocean." What about a map? The news section publishes a map to show us where we are bombing in Afghanistan, where the fires are raging in Australia, where refugees are coming from as they land on Christmas Island, where a plane crashed. What's wrong with a little geography? Children from other nations know where Lake Tahoe is, but ours do not know where the Seine River is. Every little bit helps.
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NEWS
June 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Two tankers collided on the Seine River near this western port today, causing a fire and explosion that killed one sailor, injured two and left five missing, port officials reported. They said the explosion on the 16,000-ton Panama-registered Vitoria, which split in two and sank, was strong enough to blow windows out of buildings in a 2 1/2-mile radius. Officials said the Vitoria unloaded gasoline in the Rouen port at 10 a.m.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2000 | GARY LEE, WASHINGTON POST; Gary Lee is on the staff of the Post
Guidebooks to Paris tout the Left Bank as where it's at--the south side of the River Seine, with the city's most fashionable boutiques, hippest cafes and most charming dining spots. After all, this is the part of the French capital where the Lost Generation came to find itself, the place with the in-crowd following. Maybe yesterday, mon ami. Not anymore. Parisian trendsetters have packed their Prada bowling bags and moved to the other side of the Seine.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2002
The Geo Quiz is fun and interesting; it is something we do religiously every Sunday. However, when we wanted to see exactly where the Bay of Fundy was, we were at a loss. All you gave us was the "Atlantic Ocean." What about a map? The news section publishes a map to show us where we are bombing in Afghanistan, where the fires are raging in Australia, where refugees are coming from as they land on Christmas Island, where a plane crashed. What's wrong with a little geography? Children from other nations know where Lake Tahoe is, but ours do not know where the Seine River is. Every little bit helps.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | Associated Press
A bomb exploded in the post office on the ground floor of the Paris City Hall today, killing one person and injuring an undetermined number, police said. The windows in the ground-floor post office were blown out. Glass was strewn across the square in front of the building. Initial reports by an unidentified City Hall official who said the facade of the ornate building was completely blown out proved incorrect.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | JOSEPH SCHUMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
City officials promised a "bridge to the 21st century," a state-of-the-art Seine River crossing that would ease the capital's choking traffic and open decayed eastern neighborhoods to development. What they delivered was an over-budget $48-million span that has all the grace of an airplane wing and is widely ridiculed as "the bridge to nowhere."
TRAVEL
June 28, 1987 | DOROTHY COHEN and JERRY COHEN, Dorothy Cohen is a free-lance writer living in South Pasadena; Jerry Cohen is a Times Staff Writer
When foot-weary from museum sauntering, enchanting though the sights may be, and when your stomach is rebellious from overindulgence in food and drink (always so beguiling here), try a barge. For a lazy respite and something just a bit different while in Paris, on a barge trip along the Canal St. Martin you get the pleasure of Steven Zade's company.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The scene has changed barely at all in this century. If you look down Rue Saint Dominique today and compare it with a photo taken around 1910, you will see the Eiffel Tower hovering over the same frenetic, curving street crowded with little shops, busy pedestrians and frustrated traffic. Some men wore boater straw hats then and all women wore dresses down to their ankles, and many vehicles were still horse-drawn buggies. But then and now the scene offered, and offers, the heart of Paris.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2000 | GARY LEE, WASHINGTON POST; Gary Lee is on the staff of the Post
Guidebooks to Paris tout the Left Bank as where it's at--the south side of the River Seine, with the city's most fashionable boutiques, hippest cafes and most charming dining spots. After all, this is the part of the French capital where the Lost Generation came to find itself, the place with the in-crowd following. Maybe yesterday, mon ami. Not anymore. Parisian trendsetters have packed their Prada bowling bags and moved to the other side of the Seine.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | JOSEPH SCHUMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
City officials promised a "bridge to the 21st century," a state-of-the-art Seine River crossing that would ease the capital's choking traffic and open decayed eastern neighborhoods to development. What they delivered was an over-budget $48-million span that has all the grace of an airplane wing and is widely ridiculed as "the bridge to nowhere."
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
A small car with 10 youths ages 14 to 17 jammed inside fell into the Seine River early Sunday in the town of St. Mammes, and five of the passengers drowned, police said. The automobile was being driven down a riverside street at about 4 a.m. in the town 45 miles southeast of Paris when it went into the river, police said.
TRAVEL
June 28, 1987 | DOROTHY COHEN and JERRY COHEN, Dorothy Cohen is a free-lance writer living in South Pasadena; Jerry Cohen is a Times Staff Writer
When foot-weary from museum sauntering, enchanting though the sights may be, and when your stomach is rebellious from overindulgence in food and drink (always so beguiling here), try a barge. For a lazy respite and something just a bit different while in Paris, on a barge trip along the Canal St. Martin you get the pleasure of Steven Zade's company.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Two tankers collided on the Seine River near this western port today, causing a fire and explosion that killed one sailor, injured two and left five missing, port officials reported. They said the explosion on the 16,000-ton Panama-registered Vitoria, which split in two and sank, was strong enough to blow windows out of buildings in a 2 1/2-mile radius. Officials said the Vitoria unloaded gasoline in the Rouen port at 10 a.m.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | Associated Press
A bomb exploded in the post office on the ground floor of the Paris City Hall today, killing one person and injuring an undetermined number, police said. The windows in the ground-floor post office were blown out. Glass was strewn across the square in front of the building. Initial reports by an unidentified City Hall official who said the facade of the ornate building was completely blown out proved incorrect.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The scene has changed barely at all in this century. If you look down Rue Saint Dominique today and compare it with a photo taken around 1910, you will see the Eiffel Tower hovering over the same frenetic, curving street crowded with little shops, busy pedestrians and frustrated traffic. Some men wore boater straw hats then and all women wore dresses down to their ankles, and many vehicles were still horse-drawn buggies. But then and now the scene offered, and offers, the heart of Paris.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | Associated Press
An African man fleeing a police identity check jumped into the Seine River and drowned Monday. France recently approved laws making it easier for police to conduct random identity checks with the aim of finding and expelling illegal aliens. The man's identity and nationality were not disclosed.
TRAVEL
October 16, 2005 | R.J. McClure
Spend Thanksgiving dining on French cuisine on a low-cost five-night trip to Paris. The Thanksgiving special starts at $639 per person, double occupancy, from Los Angeles to Paris, and includes airfare, accommodations, daily breakfast, city tax, a Seine River cruise and a traditional turkey-andtrimmings Thanksgiving dinner. Airport taxes and fees are $196. Information: France Vacations, (800) 332-5332, www.francevacations.net. -- R.J. McClure
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