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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998
Am I the only person in the universe who has never watched "Seinfeld"? Oh well. SUSAN LESLIE SMITH San Gabriel
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014
Charles Sumner 'Chuck' Stone Jr. Columnist and educator helped found association for black journalists Charles Sumner "Chuck" Stone Jr., 89, a longtime journalist and educator who was one of the founders of the National Assn. of Black Journalists, died Sunday at an assisted living facility in Chapel Hill, N.C., according to his daughter Allegra Stone. The cause was not given. Many who helped launch the association credited Stone as the driving force behind its founding, said its current president, Bob Butler.
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FOOD
January 7, 1998 | MATTHEW JAFFE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Homey!" I knew it was Mackey. Nobody else calls me Homey. Nobody else calls me at 3:42 a.m. "Homey, listen up. 'Seinfeld' is done after this year. Now I've got a question for you. What has that show always been about?" Even for Mackey, a man so serious about television that he refuses to watch post-Dick York episodes of "Bewitched" ("We all know there's only one Darrin Stevens"), this seemed a most bizarre question.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Stand-up comedian John Pinette has died at age 50. According to the Associated Press, the comedian, who was best known for his routine about an all-you-can eat Chinese buffet and for guest-starring on the series finale of "Seinfeld," was found dead of natural causes in a Pittsburgh hotel room. Pinette, who had struggled with his weight for decades, died of natural causes, according to the Allegheny County Medical Examiner's office. Pinette's personal doctor also signed off on the cause of death, meaning no autopsy is planned.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1996
I would like to extend my thanks to Howard Rosenberg, who devoted his column on Nov. 27 to reliving several "hilarious" episodes of "Seinfeld" ("A Word of Thanks to Funny 'Seinfeld' "). His favorites? One centered on an exposed bra on Sue Ellen, one on having no sex and another on who could go the longest without masturbating. I was pretty sure I was not missing anything worthwhile by not watching "Seinfeld." Now I am sure of it! And why are reruns of this type of show being shown at 7:30 p.m.?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1997
That's some crush Howard Rosenberg's got on Jerry Seinfeld ("Mundane Awards, Momentous Words," Sept. 15). The man could say, "Heil Hitler," and Rosenberg would rhapsodize: "How droll! How charming! How wry!" About Seinfeld's remark "I guess you didn't buy me as me" at the Emmys: If he meant it, his insecurity is sad. If he didn't mean it, he should be ashamed of his ungraciousness and lack of tact. There's a difference between self-effacement and self-absorption. KEVIN DAWSON Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994
I happen to like "Seinfeld," for the most part, because it looks on everyday problems of the so-called "baby boomer" generation based in New York City. But I didn't expect the show to be dangerous except perhaps to the very young watcher. There is far too much easy promiscuity on every week. There are also strange relationships between the two primary characters and their families. For example, the relationship between George and his family is funny, except it highlights the complete lack of communication between the "baby boomer" and his family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Stand-up comedian John Pinette has died at age 50. According to the Associated Press, the comedian, who was best known for his routine about an all-you-can eat Chinese buffet and for guest-starring on the series finale of "Seinfeld," was found dead of natural causes in a Pittsburgh hotel room. Pinette, who had struggled with his weight for decades, died of natural causes, according to the Allegheny County Medical Examiner's office. Pinette's personal doctor also signed off on the cause of death, meaning no autopsy is planned.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Seinfeld" is going off on NBC, but it will be on in a few years on KCOP-TV Channel 13. The station surprised television insiders Friday by announcing it had purchased the second syndication cycle for the hit comedy, stealing "Seinfeld" from KTLA-TV Channel 5, which is currently showing the reruns. The deal mirrors a recent agreement in New York, where a Fox station outbid the Tribune-owned station that now carries the reruns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ian Abercrombie, 77, the British character actor who played Elaine's demanding boss, Mr. Pitt, on "Seinfeld," died Thursday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his friend Cathy Lind Hayes. He suffered complications of kidney failure and recently had been diagnosed with lymphoma. As the eccentric Justin Pitt, Abercrombie appeared in seven episodes opposite Julia Louis-Dreyfus' Elaine Benes in the high-rated sit-com. "I was a pain in the neck. I was a hypochondriac.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
After a hoax report that Wayne Knight had died in a traffic accident near the New York - Pennsylvania border, the actor who played Newman on "Seinfeld" and a treacherous techie in "Jurassic Park" took humorously to his Twitter account to dispel the rumors of his sudden demise. “Some of you will be glad to hear this, others strangely disappointed … but I am alive and well!” tweeted Knight, 58, taking a wry view of some folks' tendency to confuse him with the characters he has played.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If you felt like there was something missing from the "'Seinfeld' reunion" as it played on Sunday's Super Bowl, it's because there was. Some five minutes were cut from the complete version, a now-available episode of Jerry Seinfeld's Web series, "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee," for which the Super Bowl spot served as an ad (and, by extension, as an ad for the series' sponsor, Acura). There are of course reasons, tens of millions of them, why the sketch, I think we can call it, did not run full-length during the football game - "As expensive as a Super Bowl minute" is a phrase I hereby trademark, if I can do that.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
Did Peyton Manning have something to do with that "Seinfeld" commercial? In the middle of a game in which the vaunted quarterback couldn't seem to make anything happen, the much-speculated upon "secret" "Seinfeld" Super Bowl project revealed itself to be both a mini-cast reunion and a commercial for Jerry Seinfeld's Web series "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. " Unfortunately, like the Broncos' quarterback, it had a hard time connecting. There they were, Jerry and George (Jason Alexander)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
Could a "Seinfeld" reunion really be in the works? Well, it isn't not in the works, Jerry Seinfeld said Thursday in a giant tease of an interview with New York's WFAN radio station.  Appearing on "Boomer & Carton," Seinfeld was asked about a photo taken on Jan. 13 of the comedian and his former "Seinfeld" co-star, Jason Alexander, standing outside Tom's Restaurant in New York's Upper West Side. As "Seinfeld" fans are well aware, the exterior of Tom's was used in establishing shots of the fictional Monk's Diner, Jerry and the gang's favorite greasy spoon.  PHOTOS: Memorable TV series finales Understandably, the photo fueled speculation about what they were up to. Some thought they might be collaborating on a Super Bowl commercial; others theorized Seinfeld and Alexander were filming an episode of Seinfeld's popular Web series, "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Jerry Seinfeld apparently has teamed up with his "Seinfeld" co-creator Larry David for a new project. But any more information than that will have to wait. Seinfeld participated in a Reddit "Ask Me Anything" Q&A on Monday to promote his new Web series "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. " During the online discussion , he was asked about his friendship with "Curb Your Enthusiasm" star David. Together, they once created one of the most iconic sitcoms of the 1990s: "Seinfeld. " In response to a question about the most mundane thing David and Seinfeld ever obsessed over, he wrote, "We never obsess over anything that isn't mundane.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard and Laura Davis
Jerry Seinfeld took questions about the landmark comedy series "Seinfeld" on Reddit on Monday. Fans who tuned in to ask the comedian questions on the site's Ask Me Anything forum were talking Soup Nazi, George's voice-mail song, the episode that was never made and more. Here are some highlights: 1. The scrapped "Seinfeld" storyline "There was one episode where Jerry bought a handgun," Seinfeld said. "And we started making it and stopped in the middle. " The episode was scratched after the read-through -- "trying to make that funny ended up being no fun. " 2. When Jerry met Larry The first time Seinfeld became acquainted with series co-creator Larry David was in 1975 when David was leaning on the fender of Seinfeld's car: "I actually was eavesdropping on him talking to another comedian, and I wasn't even in comedy yet. But he was leaning on my car in front of the Improv....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002
Jason Alexander is probably best known for his role as the ever-put-upon George Costanza in "Seinfeld." He's also had numerous other television and film roles, and he has a long list of stage credits too. Below is a sampling.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Jerry Seinfeld is getting caffeinated for the New Year. On Jan. 2 his popular Web series "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee" will premiere its third season on Crackle and comediansincarsgettingcoffee.com . The show, which generally runs about 15 minutes or so, is pure Seinfeld. It features the comedian picking up another comedian friend in a new and snazzy car and going for a drive with coffee. In the first two seasons Seinfeld chewed the fat with Sarah Silverman, Chris Rock, David Letterman, Ricky Gervais and Alec Baldwin, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For a short and breezy documentary narrated by Adam Sandler in which a group of famous comedians talk about themselves, "The Improv: 50 Years Behind the Brick Wall" packs a surprisingly provocative punch. In these days of digital "stardom," when fame is tweet-fleeting and the goal too often seems more Simon Cowell-approved branding than original voice, the rigors of an old-fashioned comedy club seem historically artisanal, like candle-dipping at Colonial Williamsburg. In the post-"Seinfeld" years, stand-up comedy, once the province of the scruffy and outrageous, has become increasingly sleek and well fed. Ray Romano, Jay Leno, Bill Maher, Judd Apatow, Jerry Seinfeld, Larry David, the Wayans brothers, Sarah Silverman, Kathy Griffin, Jimmy Fallon - the people reminiscing here about the Improv are among the media elite, with studio deals and television shows, car collections and famous divorces.
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