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Seinfeld Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone in town is home watching the big series finale of "Seinfeld." So, figure the newlywed couple on ABC's "Dharma & Greg," what better time to be adventurous and have sex in a public place? But as the San Francisco couple--she's a yoga instructor, he's a U.S. attorney--prepare to get down to business on the steps of the federal courthouse, they are spotted by Greg's African American supervisor.
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SPORTS
July 23, 2007 | CROWE'S NEST, Times Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, before "The Pick" and "The Junior Mint" and "The Puffy Shirt" and "The Big Salad" and "The Soup Nazi," many Americans had never heard of "Seinfeld," the iconic NBC television series that first aired in 1989. Among the uninitiated was Keith Hernandez. A former National League most valuable player, Hernandez was unaware of the show and uninterested in acting but nevertheless accepted an invitation to guest star.
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SPORTS
July 23, 2007 | CROWE'S NEST, Times Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, before "The Pick" and "The Junior Mint" and "The Puffy Shirt" and "The Big Salad" and "The Soup Nazi," many Americans had never heard of "Seinfeld," the iconic NBC television series that first aired in 1989. Among the uninitiated was Keith Hernandez. A former National League most valuable player, Hernandez was unaware of the show and uninterested in acting but nevertheless accepted an invitation to guest star.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | BRIAN LOWERY
While not the sort of anniversary NBC is likely to celebrate, Wednesday marks one year since Jerry Seinfeld plopped a lump of coal in the network's Christmas stocking, informing NBC brass that his top-rated sitcom, "Seinfeld," would finish its epic run that spring. Some might trace NBC's current ratings woes--including a 16% decline in its audience this fall--directly to fallout from Seinfeld's bombshell.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't ask the cast or creators of "Seinfeld" why, in the four weeks since it has moved from Wednesday to Thursday nights, the NBC comedy series has suddenly gained all the momentum of an avalanche, increasing its audience by 57% and jumping from the No. 40 show on television to No. 5 last week. "This probably means that a catastrophe is imminent, that something terrible will emerge from this," fretted creator and executive producer Larry David. "I really don't know how to account for it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
Fade in. Exterior, day. Jerry's apartment building. Jerry's fellow tenants are coming home from a shopping trip. "Ayudeme con los Pampers." "Mira, no tengo llave." "Ay . . . ni yo tampoco!" Laughter up. Applause. Yada, yada, yada. * I have seen "Seinfeld" twice: Once, because everyone else in the home where I was a guest was watching it, and a second time when I was chained to a wall in an Argentine prison. OK, I lied about the prison. All I'm saying is, I wasn't struck by sitcom lightning.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the concluding chapter of "Roots" aired on ABC on Jan. 30, 1977, the United States seemed to come to a standstill. More than half of all homes tuned in, and the historical TV miniseries provided a common experience for almost 77 million viewers, spurring discussion of slavery and race in schools and offices. "They changed the times of the shows in Vegas because they were afraid nobody would show up," executive producer David L. Wolper recalled of the last night.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO and ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"Seinfeld" fans, some of them dressed like their favorite characters, gathered at bars across Orange County on Thursday night to watch the final episode and mourn the end of a TV show that has become part of their lives. At Geckos bar in Huntington Beach, patron Debra Lynn described a sentiment that seemed universal. "Everywhere you go it's 'Seinfeld' night," she said. The bar's deejay, Mike Granch of Huntington Beach, said he set his VCR to tape the finale.
NEWS
December 27, 1997 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Seinfeld" announces it's going off the air and it's front page news across the country. Viewers whine. Pundits weigh in. Even the Soup Nazi--a real-life restaurateur parodied on the show--is asked how he feels. As star Jerry Seinfeld would say, What's the deal with that? It's a television show! But Seinfeld's leave-taking is not just the disappearance of a half-hour sitcom. It's the departure of that rarest of television series--the ones that capture not merely an audience but a zeitgeist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, "Seinfeld's" current rating would have ranked No. 24 in the prime-time standings, right behind "Barnaby Jones" and "Hawaii Five-O." That was then, and this is now: "Seinfeld" leaves the stage tonight as television's most-watched program, becoming one of the most analyzed show business exits since Rhett Butler sneered, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Seinfeld" is going off on NBC, but it will be on in a few years on KCOP-TV Channel 13. The station surprised television insiders Friday by announcing it had purchased the second syndication cycle for the hit comedy, stealing "Seinfeld" from KTLA-TV Channel 5, which is currently showing the reruns. The deal mirrors a recent agreement in New York, where a Fox station outbid the Tribune-owned station that now carries the reruns.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
This is my final "Seinfeld" column. I know, I know. It comes as a shock. For weeks now, I have been keeping the content secret. Security has been so tight that even I had no idea what I'd be writing. I knew that coming up with that last column would be a difficult task. Lots of expectations. Lots of emotions. Lots of false starts. The Times considered bringing back my predecessor, former television critic Cecil Smith, to help me write it. His genius and graceful prose are legendary.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO and ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
"Seinfeld" fans, some of them dressed like their favorite characters, gathered at bars across Orange County on Thursday night to watch the final episode and mourn the end of a TV show that has become part of their lives. At Geckos bar in Huntington Beach, patron Debra Lynn described a sentiment that seemed universal. "Everywhere you go it's 'Seinfeld' night," she said. The bar's deejay, Mike Granch of Huntington Beach, said he set his VCR to tape the finale.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gossip columnists at the Boston Herald reported details Wednesday of what they call the plot of tonight's final "Seinfeld" episode. (For those who would still like to remain in the dark about the episode, read no further.) Laura Raposa and Gayle Fee reported that the finale would find the four main characters--Jerry, George, Kramer and Elaine--in jail after failing to report a carjacking they had witnessed. According to the account, the friends are put on trial.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1998 | DENISE GELLENE
Fans of "Seinfeld" have watched Jerry, George and Elaine wolf down corned beef sandwiches and greasy potato chips for years. Are they ready for a high-protein snack? Carpinteria-based Balance Bar Co. sure hopes so. It is gambling about 10% of its entire ad budget on a lavish commercial for its energy bars that will appear in tonight's final "Seinfeld" episode. Balance Bar is up against tough competition for viewers' attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, "Seinfeld's" current rating would have ranked No. 24 in the prime-time standings, right behind "Barnaby Jones" and "Hawaii Five-O." That was then, and this is now: "Seinfeld" leaves the stage tonight as television's most-watched program, becoming one of the most analyzed show business exits since Rhett Butler sneered, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1998 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
David Shenk's book "Data Smog: Surviving the Information Glut" depicts us as being info-bombarded due to the new technologies, an overload severe enough to cause social fragmentation, the decline of educational standards and even the breakdown of democracy. Since 1971, Shenk writes, the number of advertising messages alone encountered by the average American has zoomed more than 500% to 3,000 a day. It's boggling. But no more so than "Seinfeld" smog.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1998 | BRIAN LOWERY
While not the sort of anniversary NBC is likely to celebrate, Wednesday marks one year since Jerry Seinfeld plopped a lump of coal in the network's Christmas stocking, informing NBC brass that his top-rated sitcom, "Seinfeld," would finish its epic run that spring. Some might trace NBC's current ratings woes--including a 16% decline in its audience this fall--directly to fallout from Seinfeld's bombshell.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the concluding chapter of "Roots" aired on ABC on Jan. 30, 1977, the United States seemed to come to a standstill. More than half of all homes tuned in, and the historical TV miniseries provided a common experience for almost 77 million viewers, spurring discussion of slavery and race in schools and offices. "They changed the times of the shows in Vegas because they were afraid nobody would show up," executive producer David L. Wolper recalled of the last night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
Fade in. Exterior, day. Jerry's apartment building. Jerry's fellow tenants are coming home from a shopping trip. "Ayudeme con los Pampers." "Mira, no tengo llave." "Ay . . . ni yo tampoco!" Laughter up. Applause. Yada, yada, yada. * I have seen "Seinfeld" twice: Once, because everyone else in the home where I was a guest was watching it, and a second time when I was chained to a wall in an Argentine prison. OK, I lied about the prison. All I'm saying is, I wasn't struck by sitcom lightning.
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