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Seiroku Kajiyama

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NEWS
July 19, 1998 | Associated Press
Japan's bruising battle for a new leader gained momentum after a renegade Cabinet minister joined two veteran politicians in the contest to replace resigning Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. Junichiro Koizumi, the 55-year-old health and welfare minister who entered the race Saturday, is promising big tax cuts to boost the economy and a radical streamlining of government.
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NEWS
July 19, 1998 | Associated Press
Japan's bruising battle for a new leader gained momentum after a renegade Cabinet minister joined two veteran politicians in the contest to replace resigning Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. Junichiro Koizumi, the 55-year-old health and welfare minister who entered the race Saturday, is promising big tax cuts to boost the economy and a radical streamlining of government.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 1989 | From Reuters
Japan's trade minister urged more than 300 major companies today to boost imports this year by at least as much as they did last year, but industry officials expressed skepticism that the plea would have much effect. "Increases in Japan's product imports are urgently needed to reduce (Japan's) huge trade surplus," Seiroku Kajiyama told officials summoned from 162 of the 313 companies. He asked the executives to increase imports by more than 30%, rather than the 14.9% projected.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The contest for the top post in the world's No. 2 economy may come to a choice between bland and spicy. Keizo Obuchi, a leading candidate to become Japan's next prime minister, is an insider known as a consummate conciliator. Seiroku Kajiyama, the other favorite, is a far more colorful reformer whose aggressive, outspoken ways have earned him plenty of enemies.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The contest for the top post in the world's No. 2 economy may come to a choice between bland and spicy. Keizo Obuchi, a leading candidate to become Japan's next prime minister, is an insider known as a consummate conciliator. Seiroku Kajiyama, the other favorite, is a far more colorful reformer whose aggressive, outspoken ways have earned him plenty of enemies.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
Two Japanese ruling party politicians sued a magazine publisher Friday for a report claiming that they used Viagra, a newspaper reported. In the lawsuit, the two legislators denied having used Viagra and accused the weekly Shukan Shincho of defamation, the Asahi newspaper reported Friday. Seiroku Kajiyama, 72, and Kanezo Muraoka, 67, sued the publisher in Tokyo District Court on Friday, demanding a printed apology saying they never used Viagra or accepted campaign donations from the drug's maker, Asahi said.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu gave his new justice minister a stern warning for a racial slur against American blacks but will not demand his resignation, the Foreign Ministry's spokesman said today. Justice Minister Seiroku Kajiyama said on Sept. 21 that American blacks and foreign prostitutes in Tokyo are similar because both destroy good neighborhoods.
NEWS
August 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A Japanese government spokesman apologized for insulting Koreans, the latest in a string of verbal blunders by Japanese leaders over the past few years. Seiroku Kajiyama, Japan's chief government spokesman, had predicted that hostilities between North and South Korea would set off street violence between rival Korean factions in Japan. South Koreans said the comment reinforced a mistaken image of Koreans who live in Japan as thugs and gang members.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Stations Raise Static Over Slur: Two black-owned radio stations are boycotting new releases from Sony Corp.'s CBS Records because of a racial slur by a Japanese Cabinet minister. The boycott by WDAS-FM and WDAS-AM in Philadelphia is in retaliation for a comment made recently by Justice Minister Seiroku Kajiyama, who compared prostitutes in Tokyo to black Americans who move into white neighborhoods and force whites out.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | Reuters
Black members of Congress have reacted angrily to a racial slur by Japan's justice minister, who drew a parallel between blacks and prostitutes. In Tokyo, Justice Minister Seiroku Kajiyama formally apologized for telling reporters after a trip to a red-light district: "Bad money drives out good money, just like in America where the blacks came in and drove out the whites." Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.), referred to earlier remarks disparaging U.S.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1989 | From Reuters
Japan's trade minister urged more than 300 major companies today to boost imports this year by at least as much as they did last year, but industry officials expressed skepticism that the plea would have much effect. "Increases in Japan's product imports are urgently needed to reduce (Japan's) huge trade surplus," Seiroku Kajiyama told officials summoned from 162 of the 313 companies. He asked the executives to increase imports by more than 30%, rather than the 14.9% projected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1990
Representatives of the Los Angeles NAACP and civil rights groups met Monday with an official from the Japanese Consulate to protest remarks by a Japanese government minister who compared black Americans to prostitutes. Protesters demanded the resignation of Justice Minister Seiroku Kajiyama, whose remarks last week, after the arrests of foreign women allegedly working as prostitutes in Tokyo, created a stir.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1990
Drawing an analogy between prostitutes in Tokyo and blacks in America is ridiculous. Yet a Japanese cabinet official did that recently, in a most insulting manner. After a police roundup of foreign prostitutes over the weekend, Justice Minister Seiroku Kajiyama likened their presence in the Shinjuku district to black Americans who move into white neighborhoods and "ruin the atmosphere."
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