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Seismic Safety

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
Quarreling over budgetary items that constitute as little as one-80,000th of the state's projected $38-billion shortfall, Democrats and Republicans fired away at each other Monday on the financing of California's seismic safety programs. If Republican state senators were to prevail with their proposal to consolidate the Seismic Safety Commission into the state Office of Emergency Services, it would cut $442,000 from the state budget.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Rong Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith
Mayor Eric Garcetti wants buildings across Los Angeles to be graded for their seismic safety in an ambitious plan to help residents understand the earthquake risks of their office buildings and apartments. Garcetti announced what would be the nation's first seismic safety grading system for buildings during his State of the City address Thursday, when he also for the first time said he supports some type of mandatory retrofitting of older buildings that have a risk of collapse in a major earthquake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith
Mayor Eric Garcetti wants buildings across Los Angeles to be graded for their seismic safety as part of an ambitious plan to help residents understand the earthquake risks of their office buildings and apartments. Garcetti announced what would be the nation's first seismic safety grading system for buildings during his State of the City address Thursday, when he also for the first time said he supports some type of mandatory retrofitting of older buildings that have a risk of collapse in a major earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith
Mayor Eric Garcetti wants buildings across Los Angeles to be graded for their seismic safety as part of an ambitious plan to help residents understand the earthquake risks of their office buildings and apartments. Garcetti announced what would be the nation's first seismic safety grading system for buildings during his State of the City address Thursday, when he also for the first time said he supports some type of mandatory retrofitting of older buildings that have a risk of collapse in a major earthquake.
NEWS
June 5, 1994
Those of us who live or work in Santa Monica, Malibu, Pacific Palisades, or the Westside in general, know what a major impact the closure of the Santa Monica Freeway had on our daily lives following the Jan. 17 earthquake. Had this freeway and others been retrofitted for earthquake safety, it is very likely the damage and resulting closure could have been avoided. Proposition 1A on the upcoming June 7 ballot gives us all a chance to help minimize the risk of this happening again.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the Northridge quake, Hal Bernson has had every right to say, "I told you so." After all, he has been the most avid proponent of seismic safety on the Los Angeles City Council for more than a decade, spearheading a slew of safety-minded ordinances, including a widely copied law requiring the retrofitting of thousands of unreinforced masonry buildings. But Bernson has not slowed down to gloat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2004 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
The state Seismic Safety Commission, meeting here for a two-day hearing on the San Simeon earthquake of Dec. 22, has issued a strong denunciation of moves in the Legislature to scale back provisions of the state's Field Act, which requires school buildings to have seismic safeguards. The commission voted to oppose a bill by state Sen.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blaming shoddy design, construction and inspection for much of the damage in the Northridge earthquake, the California Seismic Safety Commission has called for new laws requiring additional training for architects, engineers, contractors and code-enforcement officials. The commission, meeting this week, tentatively agreed on the educational requirements and several other recommendations. But it postponed final action on an already overdue report Gov.
OPINION
September 24, 2006
Re "Big Buildings Go Unchecked After Quake," Sept. 17 Immediately after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety mobilized its entire staff to respond to all requests for inspections of damaged properties. After the inspections, recommendations were forwarded to the City Council and resulted in different mandatory and voluntary retrofit ordinances. One of those ordinances dealt with steel-frame buildings. The ordinance required owners of the 242 steel-frame buildings within specific geographical areas (highly earthquake-damaged areas of the San Fernando Valley and parts of the city's Westside)
BUSINESS
September 14, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a major earthquake ever hits San Bernardino's new county hospital, it's designed to react like a building in a big bathtub. It would move, all right, but more slowly and less forcefully than the ground around it, according to the engineers who have designed the five-building Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, set to open early next year. Key seismic safeguards?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
In the 20 years since the Northridge earthquake, the state's freeway bridges have been strengthened. A new generation of hospitals, schools and university buildings designed to better withstand a massive quake has risen. But for all those strides, changes in society and technology have left California vulnerable in other ways. The 1994 Northridge disaster occurred in an era before Wi-Fi computer access and at a time when cellphones were still something of a rarity. Seismic safety experts say that if a huge quake strikes the state now, both services would be interrupted - possibly for days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia and Rong-Gong Lin II
Two Los Angeles City Council members are calling for their colleagues to back a statewide ballot measure that provides funding to cities for "earthquake safety improvements," including helping property owners strengthen potentially dangerous buildings that could collapse in a major temblor. The resolution, proposed Friday by Tom LaBonge and seconded by Mitch Englander, asks the City Council and Mayor Eric Garcetti to support or sponsor state legislation that would help fund local seismic safety efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan, Rosanna Xia and Ari Bloomekatz
Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday he was considering a new "chief resilience officer" to oversee preparations for a major earthquake and ensure Los Angeles can minimize the disaster's damage. Garcetti's suggestion for a top coordinator of earthquake issues came as he prepares to announce what he called "some very concrete steps" to enhance seismic safety in a city with a long history of deadly temblors. "The problem is there are lots of different pieces of this, but there's nobody at City Hall who ultimately is kind of the earthquake expert, so I'm looking at that," Garcetti said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2011 | Rong-Gong Lin II and Sam Allen, Los Angeles Times
The 7.2 earthquake that rattled the U.S.-Mexico border in 2010 — the largest temblor to hit Southern California in nearly two decades — has exposed a hidden weakness in school seismic safety that officials are now trying to correct. The Easter Sunday temblor was centered south of Mexicali but was felt strongly in several Imperial County communities. Schools withstood the shaking structurally, but the damage was still extensive. Walkway coverings cracked and collapsed; light fixtures crashed to the floor; electrical wires were exposed; water and gas lines ruptured; and classroom ceilings and roofs were damaged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Work has been stopped for four months on a critical structural retrofit project of ramps leading to a bridge in Long Beach, and there is no sign when it will resume. The retrofit of the two ramps on the southbound lanes of Queensway Bay Bridge, which connects downtown Long Beach with the Port of Long Beach, was abruptly halted Nov. 19 with only 35% of the work completed. The contractor has abandoned the site, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, which hired Granada Hills-based A.M. Classic Construction for the project.
WORLD
March 15, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The political and environmental shockwaves of the Japanese earthquake reached Europe on Monday as Germany and Switzerland moved to curb their nuclear energy programs, at least temporarily. The Swiss government imposed an immediate freeze on plans to build and replace nuclear power plants until inspectors review safety standards in light of developments in Japan, where last Friday's monster earthquake and ensuing tsunami have put nuclear power stations at risk. Switzerland relies on five reactors for 40% of its energy supply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1994
In the two weeks since the Northridge earthquake sent Orange County a wake-up call on seismic safety, it has become increasingly clear just how fortunate the county was to escape with so little damage. A review of past warnings and of failures to take corrective action reveals a cavalier attitude among officials. Earthquakes in Southern California are so frequent there is no excuse for governments to be caught ill-prepared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1995 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Structural engineer Nabih Youssef has had difficult and politically sensitive assignments before, including seismic retrofitting of City Hall and Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. His latest task, though, may be the earthshaker. Soon he will be center stage in one of the most contentious architectural preservation squabbles in city history--the dispute over the plan to demolish St. Vibiana's Cathedral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2007 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
With three-quarters of California's acute-care hospitals at risk of collapsing in a major earthquake, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has approved new rules allowing many facilities to bypass the extremely costly building reinforcements the state ordered after the 1994 Northridge temblor. Schwarzenegger is permitting some financially struggling hospitals to keep operating until 2020 even though the state says they are most likely to crumple during a major seismic event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
James E. Slosson, a former state geologist who helped establish the California Seismic Safety Commission, which provides guidelines for reducing earthquake hazards, has died. He was 84. Slosson died of congestive heart failure April 28 at Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center, his daughter-in-law, Lynn Slosson, said Friday. He was a longtime resident of Sherman Oaks.
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