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Seismic

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1996
The March 11 editorial, "Yes on Two Bond Measures," is disappointing. Recent attacks on the MTA for a number of construction blunders, while well-deserved, come after decades of ignoring more serious, catastrophic engineering design errors in Caltrans projects. Background and history regarding the fragility of 8,000 California highway bridges have been gracefully ignored. The recent drainage problem on the Century Freeway was relegated to B1 (March 6). The failure of bridges on the Santa Monica Freeway two years ago was treated as a Caltrans tour de force, instead of an egregious cover-up of a foul-up.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homes throughout south Orange County could be heavily damaged by liquefaction or landslides in a major earthquake, according to maps released Thursday by the state Department of Conservation. The maps, which cover 120 square miles, identify dangers in the event of a magnitude 6.0 or greater earthquake in Aliso Viejo, Dana Point, Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Mission Viejo, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente and San Juan Capistrano.
REAL ESTATE
September 6, 1998 | BARRY STONE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
QUESTION: I am selling my 15-year-old home. My buyer's home inspector recommends seismic safety improvements for the foundation, and the buyer is demanding that I comply with the report. Since my home was built to code and there have been no settlement problems as verified in the inspection report, am I obligated to make these expensive foundation repairs? If so, what is the extent of the work and how much is it likely to cost?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000 | KENNETH REICH
When Caltech scientists Egill Hauksson and Tom Heaton told me the TriNet system of hundreds of seismic stations, painstakingly constructed over the past five years, could be jeopardized through a lack of $2 million in annual maintenance money as early as 2001, I could scarcely believe it. After all, the system, funded thus far by federal and state grants and a few private gifts, has already paid consumers spectacular benefits. When the magnitude 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1997
I found your Dec. 30 article about welded structures extremely interesting. My recollection of the testing at the University of Texas in May 1994 is that it caused failure of an expert weld during the first peak of the first cycle of a simulated moderate-level earthquake acceleration. As a retired aerospace engineer, tired of hearing the myth of "the $600 toilet seat," I find it hard to believe that E70T-4 welding material is still in use at any site, with its potential for causing many casualties during an earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a delightful enough place for a stroll--a wide, outdoor arcade paved in muted tones of concrete aggregate flanked by ferns and other tropical greenery spilling over raised planters. A high, transparent dome blunts the midday sun, yet allows the long path to be bathed in light. Glass elevators quietly slip up and down, offering their brief glimpse of the world from varying heights. Welcome to the parking garage.
SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It began as series of small shuddering earthquakes beneath Alaska's Mt. Redoubt that gradually coalesced into a high-frequency "scream," according to seismologists. While scientists could only guess as to what triggered the vibrations, there was no question about what happened next: The seismic scream was followed by 30 seconds of silence, and then a series of volcanic eruptions -- 20 over a two-week period -- that launched an enormous plume of ash resembling a mushroom cloud. In a study published recently in Nature Geoscience, researchers examined data from the 2009 eruption and concluded that the sustained vibrations were caused by numerous so-called stick-slip movements on faults more than a mile beneath the volcano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
In a case that highlights a "gray area" of city regulations, a Los Angeles landlord was ordered Wednesday to restore utilities and stop eviction proceedings against tenants in a building that he is renovating pending a further court hearing. Superior Court Judge Ricardo A. Torres issued a temporary restraining order against Daniel Lerner of DL Investments, owner of an apartment building at 706 S. Normandie Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1996
When "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" goes on stage at the El Capitan Theatre later this month, it's not likely that the 68-year-old West Hollywood monument will come tumbling down. Not after this week, when 140,000 pounds of steel were threaded vertically through the building as part of a $3-million seismic retrofitting.
NEWS
November 25, 1990
A $44,000 contract with a structural engineering firm for further seismic studies of City Hall was approved last week by city directors. An initial $14,000 study by the firm, Dames and Moore, found that most of the 1927 building is made of reinforced concrete and steel and wood framing that would stand up well under an earthquake.
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