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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
A magnitude 5.7 temblor Thursday night was the largest earthquake to shake California since 2008 and has generated curiosity from seismologists. The temblor occurred in a rugged section of Northern California that has not been studied as thoroughly as Southern California and the Bay Area and has less monitoring equipment. Experts said they were surprised the quake was felt over such a large area, and they plan to go to the region to investigate. The magnitude 5.7 quake struck around 8:47 p.m., about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento; its epicenter was about 27 miles southwest of the town of Susanville.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | Elaine Woo
Vladimir Keilis-Borok, an internationally known seismologist and geophysicist who never wavered in his dogged pursuit of what he called his profession's "holy grail" -- a method to accurately predict earthquakes -- died Saturday at his Culver City home after a long illness. He was 92. His death was announced by UCLA, where he had been a professor since 1998. The eminent Russian scientist garnered headlines after two large temblors -- in Japan and Central California -- occurred in 2003 within the time frame forecast by his international team of earthquake experts.
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WORLD
October 6, 2009 | Charles McDermid
Expect a far more powerful earthquake than last week's magnitude 7.6 temblor to hit the devastated Indonesian city of Padang and surrounding areas in the next few decades. That's the word from a team of leading seismologists, who said the worst is yet to come, although they cautioned that predicting the timing of earthquakes is an inexact science at best. After a three-day review of seismic evidence using global-positioning equipment, scientists with the Earth Observatory of Singapore, or EOS, found that the Padang earthquake did little to relieve the stored tension at the juncture of two tectonic plates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
A magnitude 5.7 temblor Thursday night was the largest earthquake to shake California since 2008 and has generated curiosity from seismologists. The temblor occurred in a rugged section of Northern California that has not been studied as thoroughly as Southern California and the Bay Area and has less monitoring equipment. Experts said they were surprised the quake was felt over such a large area, and they plan to go to the region to investigate. The magnitude 5.7 quake struck around 8:47 p.m., about 150 miles northeast of Sacramento; its epicenter was about 27 miles southwest of the town of Susanville.
MAGAZINE
February 6, 1994 | Kathleen Moloney
coffin site n . ground where instruments used to measure earthquakes are put into coffin-sized boxes and buried. "Installing a coffin site is a field technician's worst detail." dead candidate n. a long-dormant fault that suddenly shows signs of activity. "The Frew Fault is definitely a dead candidate. " jugs n . seismometers, which are jug-shaped. "My jugs weren't working so I had to return to the shop." Mogi doughnut n .
MAGAZINE
April 1, 1990
I am a Bay Area resident, and my sister, Sue Hough, was one of the 50-plus seismologists who flew out to California after the Loma Prieta quake. I wonder how many of those other seismologists also "left young children in the charge" of their spouses. I also assume that if it had been my brother you interviewed for the story, the issue wouldn't have even made print. JANICE HOUGH Palo Alto
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1992
When are the TV commentators going to stop frightening people by talking about "the Big One"? Of course we can have a big one, but a friend of mine who's knowledgeable on the subject told me, as far as predicting earthquakes, neither the seismologists nor the TV commentators know their shakes from a quake in the ground. HAROLD SOLOMON Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989
A mild earthquake Monday was more of an annoyance than anything else to northern Orange County residents awakened by the 5:44 a.m. temblor. No damage or injuries were reported in Orange or Los Angeles counties. Seismologists at Caltech said the shaker registered a 2.9 and was centered beneath the Hacienda Heights area in Los Angeles County. The quake followed two temblors that shook the Southland over the weekend. A quake measuring 3.7 struck 1 mile northwest of Brea late Saturday night.
MAGAZINE
January 21, 1996
Terry Wilcox's project involving a one-acre-sized slab placed over the San Andreas Fault would be one I'd be willing to back if I had the means ("The Crack-Up," by Michael Walker, Palm Latitudes, Dec. 3). Californians greatly fear earthquakes because they've been bombarded by silly myths. No, our state is not going to fall into the ocean, nor is the ground going to open up and swallow us. Those back East stand a far greater danger from the immense power of tornadoes. Perhaps such a display as Wilcox's would bring enthusiasm to future prospective seismologists.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A total of 4,660 measurable earthquakes occurred in Southern California in the fourth quarter of 1996, of which 50 were at least magnitude 3.0, seismologists from Caltech and the U.S. Geological Survey reported Friday. For the whole year, there were 18,051 quakes recorded in the Southland, the strongest of which was a magnitude 5.3 in the Coso mountain range north of Ridgecrest on Nov. 27. There were 23,412 quakes in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Ever since hundreds of earthquakes began rippling through southeastern California over the weekend, many asked the question: Could this be a precursor to the Big One? The answer: Probably not - at least, if this swarm of quakes follows past patterns. Certainly, the weekend's quakes were troubling for Imperial County, which is located in one of California's most earthquake prone regions. More than 400 earthquakes have been detected since Saturday evening, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.
OPINION
September 26, 2011
Only in hindsight does earthquake prediction work with real accuracy. Seismologists can assess long-term risks and likely scenarios, but they'd be the last ones to say they can foretell the time, date and epicenter of the next Big One. Yet in Italy, a trial is underway for a group of seismologists and a government official accused of manslaughter for being overly reassuring about underground rumblings that preceded a killer quake in 2009. The charges they face for doing their job aren't just ludicrous but potentially damaging to scientists worldwide.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The magnitude 8.9 earthquake that struck Friday off the coast of Japan "is going to be among the top 10 earthquakes recorded since we have had seismographs," said seismologist Susan Hough of the U.S. Geological Survey in Pasadena. "It's bigger than any known historic earthquake in Japan, and bigger than expectations for that area. " Geologists had expected the portion of the Pacific "Ring of Fire" that produced this quake to yield a temblor on the order of magnitude 8 or perhaps 8.5, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
As UC Davis physicist and geologist John Rundle ponders the map of recent California earthquakes, he sees visions of a doughnut even Homer J. Simpson wouldn't like. The doughnut is formed by pinpointing the recent quakes near Eureka , Mexicali and Palm Springs. Seismologists call the possible pattern a Mogi doughnut. It's the outgrowth of a concept, developed in Japan, which holds that earthquakes sometimes occur in a circular pattern over decades —building up to one very large quake in the doughnut hole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
There is growing concern among seismologists that the 7.2 Mexicali earthquake on April 4 placed more pressure on faults in Southern California, resulting in increased quake activity over the last three months. The latest evidence of this was Wednesday's magnitude-5.4 Collins Valley earthquake that rolled from the mountains south of Palm Springs, causing no major damage but rattling nerves across the region. Wednesday's quake was centered in the San Jacinto fault zone — Southern California's most active — which runs 100 miles from the border northwesterly toward Riverside and San Bernardino.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2010 | By Amina Khan
When a magnitude 4.4 earthquake shook Southern Californians awake in the predawn hours Tuesday, many rushed to their computers to learn about it from the U.S. Geological Survey website. Those bleary-eyed Web surfers may not have realized they were giving information as well as getting it. The "Did You Feel It?" online questionnaire, which asks people to detail the intensity of the shaking and report any damage, received more than 17,800 responses after Tuesday's relatively minor shaker.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Gary and Karen Graves moved here four months ago seeking small-town values and rugged natural beauty in which to raise their three small boys. "It was a mountain paradise to build our dreams on," said Karen Graves, 34. "But a 6.1 earthquake and aftershocks ended all that." Frightened by almost-daily aftershocks that have made the Owens Valley seem like a "growling stomach that never gets fed," she and the children left town two weeks ago to stay with relatives in Fresno.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
Under the central part of the San Andreas fault, the deep seismic whisperings known as tremors have increased after two recent large earthquakes, and a surge in tremors appears to have foreshadowed one of them, according to a study to be published today in the journal Science. "It reaffirms the need to be ready," said Robert Nadeau, a research seismologist at UC Berkeley who led the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
This week's predawn earthquake in Pico Rivera woke up people around Southern California, but the magnitude 4.4 temblor didn't cause major damage. But scientists said the quake should serve as a warning about a fault that runs through a large swath of densely populated Los Angeles County and is capable of producing a devastating, magnitude 7.5 quake. The Puente Hills thrust fault is less well-known than other faults such as the San Andreas and Newport-Inglewood. But there is growing scientific evidence that it is particularly dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2010 | By Cara Mia DiMassa
If Elizabeth Cochran allowed herself to dream, the future would look something like this: Every personal computer would double as a seismic monitor. That MacBook at the coffee house, the one used by the guy pounding out a screenplay? Working to detect ground tremors while its user sips a latte. The aging PC gathering dust in the guest room? Ready to catch the next quake. If Cochran, an earth scientist at UC Riverside, has her way, every time the ground beneath us shakes, those machines would capture its movement and feed the information to a central computer system, creating a rich -- and inexpensive -- portrait of how and where an earthquake is felt.
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