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Seismology

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NEWS
June 10, 1994 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The earthquake that occurred 400 miles underneath Bolivia on Wednesday night, and was felt thousands of miles north in Canada, was upgraded by scientists Thursday to at least a magnitude 8.2 and called a unique opportunity for study of Earth's structure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Leon Knopoff, a UCLA researcher who was widely regarded as the father of theoretical seismology, died of respiratory failure Jan. 20 at his home in Sherman Oaks. He was 85. Knopoff did pioneering research in "how an earthquake works," said his colleague, UCLA geophysicist Paul M. Davis. "He demonstrated that an earthquake can be represented in terms of forces ? then reduced it to a much simpler mathematical model of forces acting within the Earth. " He was among the first to apply computer modeling to earthquakes, using applied mathematics to develop sophisticated representations of what was happening beneath the Earth's surface.
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NEWS
December 4, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Hundreds of years before European settlers founded Seattle, an earthquake fault under what is now the Kingdome shook the area with a mighty force, lifting parts of the Puget Sound shore by 20 feet, triggering massive landslides and pushing a tidal wave toward Canada.
OPINION
April 22, 2010
Ever since we heard an Iranian cleric explain that scantily clad and promiscuous women are the cause of earthquakes, we just can't get Carole King out of our heads: "I feel the earth move under my feet, I feel the sky tumbling down." Of course, that's not the kind of sexual seismology Hojatoleslam Kazem Sedighi had in mind when he told worshipers in Tehran last week that women who dress immodestly corrupt young men and lead them to adultery, thereby increasing earthquakes. "What can we do to avoid being buried under the rubble?"
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Why does one earthquake feel so much different from another? The earthquake that rattled through Southern California on Wednesday may have felt quite different to people who experienced the Montebello quake last June 12, even if they were in the same place both times. Workers in office buildings in downtown Los Angeles, for example, reported feeling a sharp jolt from the 4.5 magnitude Montebello quake, whereas Wednesday's 5.5 temblor produced a long rolling motion.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | KENNETH REICH and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scientists trying to analyze the ongoing Southern California earthquake sequence focused their interest Monday on a section of the San Andreas Fault after several aftershocks were detected near the state's longest and most infamous quake zone. Cautioning that they cannot be certain what it all means, Caltech and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hiroo Kanamori knows more about earthquakes than anyone . . . although he probably says, 'I don't understand' more than any other geophysicist," read the citation when the Seismological Society of America gave its annual medal to the Caltech scientist two years ago. This probably captured as well as anything the essence of Kanamori, 57, director of the Caltech Seismological Laboratory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To mark today's 30th anniversary of the devastating San Fernando-Sylmar earthquake, the state Department of Conservation released a new map Thursday identifying in great detail the geologic materials in the San Fernando Valley and how they respond to seismic activity. With the map, geologists and engineers have the most complete picture to date of the Valley's unique geological makeup, giving them another tool to evaluate an area's susceptibility to shaking during an earthquake, experts say.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | KENNETH REICH and LEE DYE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For millions of years, earthquakes such as the one that struck Southern California on Wednesday evening have been pushing and tugging at the Earth in a process that gradually created the San Bernardino and San Gabriel mountains. Wednesday's earthquake, which was given a preliminary magnitude of 5.5 by Caltech and the U.S. Geological Survey, struck in rocky, hilly terrain that is highly fractured by various faults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It used to be when an earthquake struck Southern California, it once took half an hour or more for seismological authorities to pinpoint its epicenter and give a preliminary magnitude. Rescue agencies, public utilities with vulnerable transmission facilities and the news media were all kept waiting. That is changing. In the past year, a system developed by Caltech and the U. S. Geological Survey has enabled scientists to pinpoint earthquakes within five minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2008 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
Southern California stands a much greater chance of a huge temblor in the next 30 years than Northern California, according to a statewide earthquake forecast released Monday. The report, which brought together experts from the U.S. Geological Survey, USC's Southern California Earthquake Center and the State Geological Survey, also found that California is virtually certain to experience at least one major temblor by 2028. According to the research, the chance of a 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2007 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
Earthquakes that struck Southern California over the last century killed more than 200 people and caused billions of dollars in damage. But new research to be released today says the Los Angeles area may actually be in the midst of a prolonged seismic lull. Geologists examined the size and frequency of quakes going back 12,000 years, finding patterns of heavy and lighter seismic activity every 1,000 to 1,500 years.
SCIENCE
June 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
New earthquake research confirms the southern end of the San Andreas fault near Los Angeles is overdue for a Big One, according to an analysis published in the current issue of the journal Nature. The lower section of the fault has not produced a major earthquake in more than three centuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2006 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
A study of how earthquake waves from the San Andreas fault travel through different types of Southern California soil marks what scientists say is a promising first step in an ambitious effort to pinpoint neighborhoods and even individual city blocks where the shaking would be most severe.
SCIENCE
April 1, 2006 | From Reuters
The fault that caused the 9.0 earthquake in Indonesia in December 2004 and the devastating tsunami that followed could still cause some big ruptures, U.S. researchers said Thursday. Analysis of the damage of an 8.7 quake that followed in the same area three months later shows potential for large movements south of the 2004 and 2005 ruptures, said Richard Briggs and Kerry Sieh of Caltech. "This southern part is very likely about ready to go again," Sieh said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2005 | Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
Faint signals during the first moments of a large earthquake can be used to predict the severity of ground shaking before a fault has finished rupturing, potentially offering crucial seconds for early warning, according to a new study.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rains have come, and so have scientists and sightseers, and, just three months after the event that caused it, the dramatic 45-mile-long main rupture zone of the Landers earthquake is showing signs of deterioration. The natural and man-made erosion is complicating the job of researchers who are measuring the displacement and studying faults caused by California's third most powerful quake this century. A visit to the area of maximum slippage with a U.S.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two big aftershocks, magnitudes 6.5 and 6.0, that struck Humboldt County early Sunday gave rise to concern among earthquake experts that additional aftershocks may not diminish in intensity, as they usually do. "Based on accumulated scientific information on the area where the earthquakes struck, continuing aftershocks as large as magnitude 5 could occur within the next few weeks and additional aftershocks of magnitude 6 cannot be ruled out," said the Office of Emergency Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2005 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
Were last week's quakes in California connected? Maybe. Did they relieve pressure on major fault lines? Perhaps, but not much. Did they make a bigger quake more likely? Possibly. These are not exactly the answers quake-rattled Californians are looking for. But the recent temblors involve some of the issues that seismologists most often debate. And the more research they do, the more they sometimes disagree. Even husband and wife seismologists don't see eye to eye.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Newly developed computer models applied for the first time to the Puente Hills fault beneath downtown Los Angeles suggest a 7.5 magnitude quake could cause as much as a quarter of a trillion dollars in damage and kill as many as 18,000 people. Scientists have known for the last two years that the fault is the major quake threat to urban Los Angeles, but the new projections released Wednesday provide the first rough picture of the potential loss of life and property.
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