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Seismology

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2002 | KENNETH REICH and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A magnitude 4.8 earthquake centered three miles northeast of Yorba Linda early Tuesday was the strongest temblor to hit the Orange County-Los Angeles metropolitan area in more than five years, scientists said. The earthquake struck at 12:08 a.m. and was strong enough to wake some residents in Orange County, the nearby Inland Empire and eastern Los Angeles County, although no major damage or injuries were reported. Scientists at Caltech and the U.S.
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SCIENCE
August 19, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A geological fault discovered beneath the sea near Japan poses the threat of generating giant waves, a study reports. Such waves, called tsunamis, could pose a threat to densely populated coastal cities in southwestern Japan. Researchers led by Jin-Oh Park of the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center in Yokohama discovered the fault using a seismic reflection profile, developed by measuring vibrations from the surface that are reflected back by deep rock formations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2002 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ron Muranaka paid $564,000 for a stucco Colonial in Yorba Linda with dramatic views of the Chino Hills, he was vaguely aware that the area was earthquake-prone. But so was the rest of California, he figured. Seven years later, his yard cracked apart. Then the driveway split. The living room walls separated and door frames warped. But all that paled next to what happened early one summer morning in 1999: With a roar, much of the backyard slid 40 feet down a cliff.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | ALI AKBAR DAREINI, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
The most recent earthquake to hit quake-prone Iran shook five provinces, flattened villages, killed 245 people -- and left residents of Iran's capital and population center wondering fearfully what would happen if Tehran were next.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2002 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists from Stanford University and the U.S. Geological Survey say they have calculated the ideal place to drill a 1.4-mile-deep research hole along California's San Andreas fault. "We are in a transitional zone of the fault," Stanford geophysicist Mark Zoback told reporters gathered Monday from throughout the state. "The magnitude-6 earthquake of 1857 ruptured south from here. It probably was a foreshock of the great magnitude-8 Fort Tejon earthquake of that same year."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2002 | KENNETH REICH and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Gilroy earthquake Monday night was small by Bay Area standards, but a reminder of what quakes there can be. The quake's magnitude was revised Tuesday from the original 5.2 to 4.9. Bill Ellsworth, the scientist in charge of earthquake studies for the U.S. Geological Survey in the West, and Doug Dreger of the UC Berkeley Seismographic Laboratory, changed the figure based on more readings from various stations in the state's new Trinet system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2002 | KENNETH REICH and USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
University of Colorado scientists say they may have found a way to forecast Southern California earthquakes--but that the method cannot be verified until the end of the decade. The system, developed primarily by John B. Rundle and Kristy F. Tiampo of Colorado's Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, uses past patterns of small quakes to evaluate which areas are most likely to have quakes of 5.0 magnitude or larger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2002 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A vigorous swarm of aftershocks of the Northridge earthquake continued to shake the Los Angeles area Tuesday, but scientists held to their view that, after eight years, the sequence is nearing its end. The flurry of more than 45 quakes began Monday night and extended into the next day. As of Tuesday evening, there had been 15,714 aftershocks of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake of Jan. 17, 1994, according to a compilation by Matt Gerstenberger of the U.S. Geological Survey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Despite its history of destructive earthquakes, geologists have only just now found what appears to be a fault within San Francisco's borders. Scientists say the fault is a relatively benign extension of the Serra thrust fault. Until now, that fault had been mapped only as far as Daly City, just to San Francisco's south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001 | NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The temblors come day and night. Schools hold duck-and-cover drills. Workers in downtown high-rises study evacuation plans. Since May 24, Spokane has been in the throes of what experts call an "earthquake swarm." More than 75 temblors have been recorded, and dozens more could not be measured because of a lack of seismographs. There have been no injuries or major damage--other than bricks falling from chimneys and items off shelves--but nerves are fraying.
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