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Seismology

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A Russian rocket fired a tiny satellite into orbit Monday designed to test a theory that major earthquakes are preceded by low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations, possibly allowing accurate quake prediction. The 10-pound satellite, developed by the Palo Alto firm QuakeFinder, was built by Stanford University students. It will orbit about 500 miles from Earth, crossing both poles, for about six months.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A group of scientists has a theory: Suppose the major faults along the coast between Los Angeles and Ensenada are all connected. And suppose that over the last several hundred years, there have been a series of quakes along various segments, moving steadily northward. If this is true, the destructive 1933 Long Beach quake on the Newport-Inglewood fault would be just the latest in a sequence of temblors, with the next one slated to occur along the fault line between Compton and Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
The earthquake that occurred this week just east of the North African city of Algiers had the exact same magnitude as the 1994 Northridge quake in Los Angeles. It erupted on the same kind of buried thrust fault and, like Northridge, was centered on the edge of a major city. But the death toll of the 6.7 Algerian quake was nearly 30 times that of the 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A magnitude 4.2 earthquake centered at a geothermal field near Clear Lake in Northern California on Tuesday highlights the increased seismic activity that has occurred since officials began generating electric power from steam heated by magma underneath the area. The quake at 9:50 a.m. at the Geysers was the strongest at the geothermal field this year. It was the eighth quake of magnitude 4 or higher since power generation began at the site north of Santa Rosa in the 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
A magnitude 7.9 earthquake that occurred on three separate faults Nov. 3 in a sparsely populated area of Alaska may have implications for an eventual large earthquake in Southern California, seismic experts say. The Denali quake did relatively little damage, but, had it happened in a heavily populated area, the devastation probably would have been widespread. As it was, it was felt as far away as Louisiana and triggered 130 quakes in Yellowstone National Park. Donna Eberhart-Phillips of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
Two scientists reported today developing a new early warning system for earthquakes that could have given downtown Los Angeles 12 seconds to stop elevators, cut off gas and get people under desks before heavy shaking began during the 1994 Northridge quake. That warning period would be enough in their view to result in a material reduction in loss of life and damage from a big temblor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2003 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
The state Conservation Department released four more in a series of seismic hazard maps that have come under fire from legislators seeking to cut state expenses by terminating the program. The maps, showing 60-square-mile areas in the Antelope Valley and other sections of the northeast part of Los Angeles County, bring to 89 the number of maps issued thus far. They show areas where a strong quake could be expected to generate landslides and what are known as liquefaction problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2003 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
As scientists uncover new dangers posed by a fault under densely populated areas of Los Angeles, two programs that protect the public against earthquake hazards could be cut in a Republican push to find more money for closing the state's budget hole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2003 | Solomon Moore and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Officials in the Los Angeles Unified School District are expected today to recommend that unfinished high school buildings on a seismic fault at the Belmont Learning Complex be used for other purposes or sold. Under the new proposal, another set of classroom buildings would rise on the western 12 acres of the 35-acre property and house about 1,500 students, less than half the enrollment previously planned, according to a school board member and other officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Earth is creating a new fault in the mountains southeast of Lake Isabella, U.S. Geological Survey scientists said. It is likely to take thousands or even a million years before becoming a full-fledged fault that could pose a major new earthquake hazard, geophysicist Gerald W. Bawden said. Scientists said this may be the first time in history that an infant fault has been detected in the process of formation.
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