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Seizures

SPORTS
March 7, 1999 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
On the first swing of the first golf practice last month, J.T. Kohut of Westlake High sent his ball flying "straight as an arrow" toward the pin on the 292-yard par-four first hole at Westlake Golf Course. "Right as the ball released his club, it was a thing of beauty," said sophomore Chris Finefrock, one of more than two dozen onlookers. The ball cleared a tree limb by a foot, bounced over a hill and headed toward the flag.
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NATIONAL
December 8, 2009 | By Arielle Levin Becker
Henry Molaison lived in relative obscurity, but he possessed one of the world's most famous brains. Known to generations of scientists and psychology students as H.M., Molaison lost the ability to form new memories after surgery removed part of his brain and, by agreeing to be studied over several decades, transformed the way we understand memory. H.M. died last December, but science isn't done with his brain. Molaison, a Hartford, Conn., native who in life often expressed a wish to do what he could to help people, donated his brain for research.
SPORTS
March 28, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
They are rebels with a cause. In their playing days, the NFL taught them to be competitors, never to go down without a fight. And so, in a quiet meeting room last weekend, away from the madding crowds of a Las Vegas casino, they got mad all over again. They have lost their youth but not their spunk. There are an estimated 21,000 NFL retirees. There are several groups that represent them, each with an agenda built around anger for the National Football League. This group was the Independent Football Veterans Inc. PHOTOS: The NFL and head injuries Visualize large men in broken bodies and listen to them as they talk about how the hits of yesteryear affect them now: Dave Pear, 57, veteran of six years and three NFL teams: "I played for the Raiders with a herniated disk in my neck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1997
Some flashy Las Vegas cats have been cooling their heels in Tujunga ever since Pomona authorities canceled their L.A. gigs. Aslan and Jagger, a lion and a tiger who have spent the last six to nine months traveling across the West in a converted potato chip truck, were seized from their owner, Joshua Saul Weinstein, 26, by Pomona Valley Humane Society officers who said the exotic cat exhibitor was storing his stars in inadequate conditions and working under a revoked permit.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2009 | Cynthia Dizikes
In the heart of the Ethiopian community here, a group of friends gathered after work in an office to chew on dried khat leaves before going home to their wives and children. Sweet tea and sodas stood on a circular wooden table between green mounds of the plant, a mild narcotic grown in the Horn of Africa. As the sky grew darker the conversation became increasingly heated, flipping from religion to jobs to local politics. Suddenly, one of the men paused and turned in his chair.
SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Bath salts, the synthetic drug made infamous by incidents of psychotic “zombie” attacks, is more potent and potentially addictive than methamphetamine, a study has found. Rats pressed a lever as many as 900 times in an attempt to get a dose of the powerful stimulant, nearly four times the effort they would exert to get a similar dose of highly addictive methamphetamine, according to experiments done at the Scripps Research Institute. “This has a lot more power than methamphetamine does to reinforce behavior,” said psychologist Michael A. Taffe, who specializes in addictive disorders at the La Jolla institute.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Chances are, your medicine cabinet contains some pills that are past their expiration date. You might even have some pain relievers, some cough syrup or some sleeping pills that were purchased back when Richard Nixon was in the White House. But you can't seem to throw them away because you suspect they might still be OK to take. If you've wondered whether medicines really do need to be tossed after their expiration date, you're got some company at the California Poison Control System, UC San Francisco and UC Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1986 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
The record seizure of 1,784 pounds of cocaine in Fullerton, Placentia and Anaheim over the weekend is an indication that Orange County has become a visible spot for major distribution of the drug, a federal prosecutor said Monday. Mark H. Bonner, who in 1984 helped dismantle the largest cocaine-trafficking network on the West Coast, said Orange County's coke haul "has the underpinnings of a gigantic case. Where it's moving and shaking is Orange County, obviously."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a phone at a hotel in San Diego's Mission Valley, reputed mobster Chris Petti reached out on Dec. 5, 1988, and touched prominent San Diego businessman Richard T. Silberman. Though the telephone was a public pay phone, it had been tapped--by FBI agents. In the phone conversation, Petti and Silberman chatted about laundering money they believed came from Colombian drug lords, federal prosecutors say. "The thing that was bad about the deal is it was too small. . . .
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