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April 15, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and Jung-yoon Choi
BEIJING -- North Korea celebrated the 101th anniversary of its founder's birth Monday with flowers and dancing instead of missiles, raising hopes that the regime may be climbing down from the furious rhetoric of recent weeks. Even the fire-breathing North Korean news service was unusually subdued, the day passing with nary a threat of thermonuclear war. Kim Jong Un, the 30-year-old leader, was reported to have paid a midnight visit to the mausoleum in Pyongyang where his grandfather, Kim Il Sung, the nation's founder, and father, Kim Jong Il, lie in state, embalmed in the Communist tradition.
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WORLD
May 18, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and Alexandra Zavis
BEIJING -- North Korea's latest missile launch comes after months of fiery rhetoric directed against South Korea, Japan and the United States, including threats of an imminent nuclear war. The provocations eased with the conclusion of annual joint military exercises between South Korea and the United States at the end of April, although fresh naval drills this month prompted renewed warnings from the North. The three missiles fired off North Korea's east coast Saturday were short-range surface-to-ship or surface-to-surface missiles, rather than the new medium-range Musudan missile that analysts feared could threaten U.S. troops in Okinawa or Guam, according to an initial assessment by the South Korean Defense Ministry.
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WORLD
February 17, 2010 | By John M. Glionna
The devoted threw a party fit for a prince: There were dancers, singers and synchronized swimmers, not to mention unnamed foreign dignitaries -- all celebrating the 68th birthday Tuesday of Kim Jong Il, North Korea's "Dear Leader." In Pyongyang, the capital, state-run media lauded a national hero "praised by mankind as the most outstanding political elder and the peerlessly brilliant commander of the present era." Outside the isolationist state, though, the take on Kim's milestone was a bit less breathless as analysts questioned his physical and mental health after a suspected stroke in 2008.
WORLD
May 18, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - North Korea fired three short-range missiles off its east coast Saturday, following through on months of threats to conduct a missile launch. The South Korean Defense Ministry reported that it detected two launches in the morning and another in the afternoon. Its initial assessment was that the missiles were short-range surface-to-ship or surface-to-surface missiles capable of traveling up to 72 miles, rather than the new medium-range Musudan missile that analysts fear could threaten U.S. troops in Guam or Okinawa, Japan.
WORLD
May 18, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - North Korea fired three short-range missiles off its east coast Saturday, following through on months of threats to conduct a missile launch. The South Korean Defense Ministry reported that it detected two launches in the morning and another in the afternoon. Its initial assessment was that the missiles were short-range surface-to-ship or surface-to-surface missiles capable of traveling up to 72 miles, rather than the new medium-range Musudan missile that analysts fear could threaten U.S. troops in Guam or Okinawa, Japan.
WORLD
February 16, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The devoted threw a party fit for a prince: There were dancers, singers and synchronized swimmers, not to mention unnamed foreign dignitaries -- all celebrating the 68th birthday Tuesday of Kim Jong Il, North Korea's glorious "Dear Leader." In Pyongyang, state-run media lauded a national hero "praised by mankind as the most outstanding political elder and the peerlessly brilliant commander of the present era." Outside the isolationist state, though, the take on Kim's milestone was a bit less breathless as analysts questioned his physical and mental health following a suspected stroke in 2008.
WORLD
May 4, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
When the "Dear Leader" hits the road for one of his rare trips outside North Korea, he doesn't take chances. And he certainly doesn't take jet planes. Shrouded in secrecy, excursions like this week's train trip to Beijing have all the markings of Kim Jong Il 's eccentric rule: logistics nuanced by enough bling to serve a seven-star hotel, and risk resistance bordering on the obsessive. On previous trips, there hasn't been just one train, but three. South Korean intelligence reports say the mystery entourage has included two dummy trains to confuse any would-be attacker.
WORLD
December 22, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
South Korean officials Tuesday braced for a possible surprise attack from North Korea and expressed new resolve to counter any aggression despite signals from North Korea that it would not retaliate for the South's live-fire military drills in disputed Yellow Sea waters. Two days after conducting an exercise similar to a November drill that triggered a deadly North Korean artillery attack on Yeonpyeong Island, South Korea kept fighter jets and a destroyer in the area to monitor the North's military activities.
WORLD
May 18, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and Alexandra Zavis
BEIJING -- North Korea's latest missile launch comes after months of fiery rhetoric directed against South Korea, Japan and the United States, including threats of an imminent nuclear war. The provocations eased with the conclusion of annual joint military exercises between South Korea and the United States at the end of April, although fresh naval drills this month prompted renewed warnings from the North. The three missiles fired off North Korea's east coast Saturday were short-range surface-to-ship or surface-to-surface missiles, rather than the new medium-range Musudan missile that analysts feared could threaten U.S. troops in Okinawa or Guam, according to an initial assessment by the South Korean Defense Ministry.
WORLD
December 21, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
South Korea on Tuesday braced for a surprise attack from North Korea following this week's provocative live-fire drills in disputed Yellow Sea waters, while officials in Seoul expressed a new resolve to counter northern aggression with decisive action. Two days after conducting an exercise similar to a November drill that triggered a North Korean artillery attack that killed four people on remote Yeonpyeong island, South Korea kept fighter jets and a destroyer in the region to monitor the north's military.
WORLD
April 15, 2013 | By Barbara Demick and Jung-yoon Choi
BEIJING -- North Korea celebrated the 101th anniversary of its founder's birth Monday with flowers and dancing instead of missiles, raising hopes that the regime may be climbing down from the furious rhetoric of recent weeks. Even the fire-breathing North Korean news service was unusually subdued, the day passing with nary a threat of thermonuclear war. Kim Jong Un, the 30-year-old leader, was reported to have paid a midnight visit to the mausoleum in Pyongyang where his grandfather, Kim Il Sung, the nation's founder, and father, Kim Jong Il, lie in state, embalmed in the Communist tradition.
WORLD
December 22, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
South Korean officials Tuesday braced for a possible surprise attack from North Korea and expressed new resolve to counter any aggression despite signals from North Korea that it would not retaliate for the South's live-fire military drills in disputed Yellow Sea waters. Two days after conducting an exercise similar to a November drill that triggered a deadly North Korean artillery attack on Yeonpyeong Island, South Korea kept fighter jets and a destroyer in the area to monitor the North's military activities.
WORLD
December 21, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
South Korea on Tuesday braced for a surprise attack from North Korea following this week's provocative live-fire drills in disputed Yellow Sea waters, while officials in Seoul expressed a new resolve to counter northern aggression with decisive action. Two days after conducting an exercise similar to a November drill that triggered a North Korean artillery attack that killed four people on remote Yeonpyeong island, South Korea kept fighter jets and a destroyer in the region to monitor the north's military.
WORLD
May 4, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
When the "Dear Leader" hits the road for one of his rare trips outside North Korea, he doesn't take chances. And he certainly doesn't take jet planes. Shrouded in secrecy, excursions like this week's train trip to Beijing have all the markings of Kim Jong Il 's eccentric rule: logistics nuanced by enough bling to serve a seven-star hotel, and risk resistance bordering on the obsessive. On previous trips, there hasn't been just one train, but three. South Korean intelligence reports say the mystery entourage has included two dummy trains to confuse any would-be attacker.
WORLD
February 17, 2010 | By John M. Glionna
The devoted threw a party fit for a prince: There were dancers, singers and synchronized swimmers, not to mention unnamed foreign dignitaries -- all celebrating the 68th birthday Tuesday of Kim Jong Il, North Korea's "Dear Leader." In Pyongyang, the capital, state-run media lauded a national hero "praised by mankind as the most outstanding political elder and the peerlessly brilliant commander of the present era." Outside the isolationist state, though, the take on Kim's milestone was a bit less breathless as analysts questioned his physical and mental health after a suspected stroke in 2008.
WORLD
February 16, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The devoted threw a party fit for a prince: There were dancers, singers and synchronized swimmers, not to mention unnamed foreign dignitaries -- all celebrating the 68th birthday Tuesday of Kim Jong Il, North Korea's glorious "Dear Leader." In Pyongyang, state-run media lauded a national hero "praised by mankind as the most outstanding political elder and the peerlessly brilliant commander of the present era." Outside the isolationist state, though, the take on Kim's milestone was a bit less breathless as analysts questioned his physical and mental health following a suspected stroke in 2008.
WORLD
October 19, 2002 | Mark Magnier and Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writers
SEOUL -- The military and strategic balance in East Asia hasn't changed much despite reports this week that North Korea admitted having an ongoing nuclear weapons program "and more." Military planners in East Asia have long assumed that the Communist regime's program was well advanced. North Korea was found nearly a decade ago to have enough plutonium for two bombs, and several defectors have detailed their experiences working at fuel enrichment plants. "While there may be some temporary impact on the North Asian neighborhood, in the long run we don't see much change and believe a solution will be found," said Lee Jong Seok, an analyst with South Korea's Sejong Institute.
WORLD
October 19, 2002 | Mark Magnier and Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writers
SEOUL -- The military and strategic balance in East Asia hasn't changed much despite reports this week that North Korea admitted having an ongoing nuclear weapons program "and more." Military planners in East Asia have long assumed that the Communist regime's program was well advanced. North Korea was found nearly a decade ago to have enough plutonium for two bombs, and several defectors have detailed their experiences working at fuel enrichment plants. "While there may be some temporary impact on the North Asian neighborhood, in the long run we don't see much change and believe a solution will be found," said Lee Jong Seok, an analyst with South Korea's Sejong Institute.
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