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Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors

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SCIENCE
July 21, 2004 | Eric D. Tytell, Times Staff Writer
Prozac and similar mood-altering drugs do not seem to cause more suicides than older, less controversial antidepressants, doctors at Boston University say. Based on about 160,000 doctors' records from Britain in the 1990s, the researchers found that Prozac and Paxil -- both from a class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors -- caused no more suicidal tendencies than two antidepressants from a class known as tricyclics.
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SCIENCE
May 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
For years, physicians have been inching their way to a better understanding of how -- and how well -- the drug ketamine, a "twilight drug" used to sedate some patients before a painful procedure, can lift someone with severe depression almost immediately from the abyss. A new study, presented in San Francisco this week at the American Psychiatric Association's yearly meeting , shows that ketamine's rapid antidepressant effect is no incidental effect of sedation: it's real, and it lasts -- albeit with diminishing effects -- for at least a week.
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NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
New Yorkers complaining to – and about – their analysts used to be primary characters in the many films of Woody Allen. But not so much lately. That change reflects the reality of Americans dealing with depression, according to a study out this week in the Archives of General Psychiatry. Treatment for depression rose substantially during the 1990s. The disability affected 0.73% of the U.S. population in 1987, and 71% of those patients relied on psychotherapists for treatment.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
New Yorkers complaining to – and about – their analysts used to be primary characters in the many films of Woody Allen. But not so much lately. That change reflects the reality of Americans dealing with depression, according to a study out this week in the Archives of General Psychiatry. Treatment for depression rose substantially during the 1990s. The disability affected 0.73% of the U.S. population in 1987, and 71% of those patients relied on psychotherapists for treatment.
SCIENCE
May 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
For years, physicians have been inching their way to a better understanding of how -- and how well -- the drug ketamine, a "twilight drug" used to sedate some patients before a painful procedure, can lift someone with severe depression almost immediately from the abyss. A new study, presented in San Francisco this week at the American Psychiatric Association's yearly meeting , shows that ketamine's rapid antidepressant effect is no incidental effect of sedation: it's real, and it lasts -- albeit with diminishing effects -- for at least a week.
SCIENCE
February 9, 2006 | Alan Zarembo and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writers
Three studies published over the past week have sparked new concerns about the health risks of taking -- and not taking -- antidepressants during pregnancy. Two of the studies point to possible dangers to the fetus, and in response to the latest study, released Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine, the Food and Drug Administration announced it was considering tougher warnings on the drugs' use. Separate research, published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Keeley Schwindt was a high school freshman who became moody and angry, and one day swallowed a massive dose of aspirin to see what would happen. Kevin Rider was a cerebral 12-year-old who gradually lost interest in his schoolwork and pleasure in his precious Boy Scout activities. Like millions of boys and girls beginning adolescence, they were diagnosed with depression, and their parents decided to put them on medication. Soon Schwindt, of Garden City, Kan.
HEALTH
July 11, 2005 | From Reuters
Heart attack patients who suffer from depression, which happens in one of every five cases, can cut their risk of suffering another heart attack by taking antidepressant drugs, a study has found. Depression and heart disease have long been recognized as companions, and one can lead to the other, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.
SCIENCE
May 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
Women who take Prozac or certain other antidepressants late in pregnancy raise the risk that their babies will suffer jitteriness, irritability and serious respiratory problems during their first couple of weeks, researchers say.
SCIENCE
February 9, 2006 | Alan Zarembo and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writers
Three studies published over the past week have sparked new concerns about the health risks of taking -- and not taking -- antidepressants during pregnancy. Two of the studies point to possible dangers to the fetus, and in response to the latest study, released Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine, the Food and Drug Administration announced it was considering tougher warnings on the drugs' use. Separate research, published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
SCIENCE
July 21, 2004 | Eric D. Tytell, Times Staff Writer
Prozac and similar mood-altering drugs do not seem to cause more suicides than older, less controversial antidepressants, doctors at Boston University say. Based on about 160,000 doctors' records from Britain in the 1990s, the researchers found that Prozac and Paxil -- both from a class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors -- caused no more suicidal tendencies than two antidepressants from a class known as tricyclics.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Benedict Carey, Times Staff Writer
Keeley Schwindt was a high school freshman who became moody and angry, and one day swallowed a massive dose of aspirin to see what would happen. Kevin Rider was a cerebral 12-year-old who gradually lost interest in his schoolwork and pleasure in his precious Boy Scout activities. Like millions of boys and girls beginning adolescence, they were diagnosed with depression, and their parents decided to put them on medication. Soon Schwindt, of Garden City, Kan.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Some women with depression who become pregnant face a troubling decision: whether to continue taking antidepressant medication to keep the depression at bay even though the medications may harm the fetus. The latest on a series of studies on this issue, published Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry, shows benefits and risks to continuing medication during pregnancy and concludes that more study is needed on the topic. As many as 6% of pregnant women take antidepressants.
OPINION
January 31, 2004
Re "Truth: a Bitter Pill for Drug Makers," Opinion, Jan. 25: Greg Critser has it exactly right that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (antidepressants) reflects a tenacious mix of medical and cultural factors. These medicines are overused for some patients, underused in others. It's so easy to accept the idea of a chemical imbalance. It sounds reasonable, whether or not it's scientifically true. If the doctor buys it, so will the patient. And when the drug appears to work, it looks like the "imbalance" has been corrected.
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