Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSelegiline Drug
IN THE NEWS

Selegiline Drug

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
March 24, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Medications designed for one purpose often end up as treatments for other conditions. That's not unusual. What is surprising is the number of older drugs that have suddenly become good candidates for treating cocaine addiction. Researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse are studying whether half a dozen medications used for such conditions as narcolepsy and influenza can help people trying to abstain from cocaine and other addictive drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
March 24, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Medications designed for one purpose often end up as treatments for other conditions. That's not unusual. What is surprising is the number of older drugs that have suddenly become good candidates for treating cocaine addiction. Researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse are studying whether half a dozen medications used for such conditions as narcolepsy and influenza can help people trying to abstain from cocaine and other addictive drugs.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
A new drug that is expected to significantly increase the quality of life for those Parkinson's disease patients for whom standard drug therapy has begun to fail has been approved for marketing, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. The new drug, selegiline, would be added to levodopa, the drug most frequently prescribed to combat symptoms of the degenerative central nervous system disorder, which include slowness of movement, muscular rigidity and an instability that often leads to falls.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
A new drug that is expected to significantly increase the quality of life for those Parkinson's disease patients for whom standard drug therapy has begun to fail has been approved for marketing, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. The new drug, selegiline, would be added to levodopa, the drug most frequently prescribed to combat symptoms of the degenerative central nervous system disorder, which include slowness of movement, muscular rigidity and an instability that often leads to falls.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|