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Selena Forever Musical

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The five-day Los Angeles run of the stage musical "Selena Forever" has been canceled due to disagreements between the promoters and producers of the musical, based on the murdered tejano singer's life. The show was scheduled to open Thursday night at the Universal Amphitheatre as part of an eight-city tour. The show's producers blame Universal's promoter Emily Simonitsch for "abandoning" their show due to low pre-sales of tickets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The five-day Los Angeles run of the stage musical "Selena Forever" has been canceled due to disagreements between the promoters and producers of the musical, based on the murdered tejano singer's life. The show was scheduled to open Thursday night at the Universal Amphitheatre as part of an eight-city tour. The show's producers blame Universal's promoter Emily Simonitsch for "abandoning" their show due to low pre-sales of tickets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2000 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
PEOPLE Wilder Battling Cancer: Comic actor Gene Wilder, 64, devastated by the death of wife Gilda Radner from cancer in 1989, is battling the disease himself. The frizzy-haired star of the 1970s comedies "Blazing Saddles" and "Young Frankenstein" is being treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan to prevent a recurrence of lymphoma, the hospital said Friday. Wilder was diagnosed with the disease last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
The Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood will remain a professional venue, at least for now. Assuming negotiations are completed successfully, union contracts will be in effect when a reworked production of "Selena Forever," the musical about the slain tejano singer, reopens the theater in January--the first production under the auspices of the theater's new owner, the Ricardo Montalban Nosotros Foundation.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It begins, as these things often do at Hollywood and Vine, with an exotic dancer of indeterminate sex. Looking fetching in a short brown skirt and long, bottle-blond hair, she (he?) is sauntering west on Hollywood Boulevard when a rap trio known as Simpson County Gangsters breaks into an impromptu hip-hop chorus about "peace, politics and prison reform." "We're from Jackson, Mississippi," says Big Tilla, 26, the group's leader, "but we really like Hollywood."
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