Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSelf Control
IN THE NEWS

Self Control

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
The 44th season of "Sesame Street" premiered Monday, and Cookie Monster made the trip out to L.A. to talk about it. Why Cookie Monster? Because Cookie Monster is starring in a new segment titled "Cookie's Crumby Pictures" that will put the blue-furred monster in parodies of several well-known films, including "The Karate Kid" and the James Bond pictures. Cookie Monster appeared in The Times' test kitchen to talk with test kitchen director Noelle Carter and staff writer Patrick Kevin Day about everything from healthful school lunches to learning a bit of self-control when it comes to eating cookies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Sound familiar? Your normally cheerful spouse has suddenly, and inexplicably, turned cranky and an otherwise pleasant day is fast becoming a scene from "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. " When you see those storm clouds gathering in your significant other's eyes, you might do well to give them some carbohydrates -- and fast. At least that's the advice of a team of researchers who examined the connection between low blood sugar levels and aggression in married couples. The paper , which was published Monday in PNAS, found that when blood glucose levels dropped, spouses were far more likely to stick pins into voodoo dolls representing their mates.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1993
According to a letter (Jan. 19), homosexuals would have to be saints to be able to take a communal shower with attractive people of the same sex. Give me a break! I'm no saint but I've been taking communal showers with attractive men since junior high gym class, in locker rooms, my college fraternity house. In 20 years I haven't groped or approached another man, or even had an uncontrollable physiological response in such a setting, even in instances where many of the men may have also been gay. Such a statement reflects ignorance of homosexuality.
HEALTH
April 5, 2014 | Lily Dayton
Each time health psychologist Kelly McGonigal teaches her Science of Willpower class, she asks students to select a willpower challenge to focus on during the 10-week course. Though students' goals are diverse -- kicking nicotine or getting out of debt, controlling their temper or overcoming alcohol abuse -- there is one goal that is most common among the 200 or 300 students who pack the lecture hall seeking life change: They want to lose weight. "It's important to understand that everyone is struggling with something," says McGonigal, whose experience in the Stanford University course inspired her to write "The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It. " Beliefs about the role of willpower in weight loss have changed through the decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2002 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second-graders in Hadley Rick's class at E.P. Foster Elementary School stand shoulder to shoulder, eyes fixed forward. Gradually, bubbles begin to dance across the room, just centimeters from their faces. The glistening, soapy spheres beg to be popped, but the children allow them to float to the floor. "Look at that self-control!" exclaims Jon Oliver, director of the Massachusetts-based Lesson One Foundation, during a recent visit to the Ventura school. "That's the same self-control you would use if a bully comes by, or if someone tries to give you drugs or alcohol."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1993
In response to "Why Does America Fear Gays?" Feb. 4: I do not fear gays and I'm not homophobic. I would rather characterize my feelings as "homonausea" against a perverse lifestyle that is based upon unnatural passions, sexual promiscuity and lack of self-control. This "homonausea" has no place in the U.S. military where self-control and discipline are vital ingredients. I am indignant at the homosexual slur "straight" when referring to heterosexuals. I am not "straight" . . . I'm normal!
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Cookie Monster was in the house! Everyone's favorite furry blue cookie lover stopped by our own Test Kitchen this morning to talk cookies (of course), fill us in on his new " Sesame Street " segment, and teach us a little about -- of all things -- self-control. "Sesame Street" begins its 44th season today, and Cookie Monster, one of its longtime stars, has appeared on the PBS children's program since its premiere in 1969. This season, Cookie Monster is starring in a new recurring feature called "Cookie's Crumby Pictures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1986
Teaching sexual self-control is a very legitimate option with a desirable goal. Not only does sexual abstinence avoid pregnancy, it also avoids sexually transmitted diseases and a lot of possible emotional instability. Proper promotion of abstinence emphasizes the proper role of sex, that of enhancing a long-term love relationship. It is not "ignoring" teen-agers' sexuality, as you claim. Rather, making contraceptives easily available gives a covert permission to go ahead and "indulge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1993
The research in Larry Stammer's article "Rethinking the Origins of Sin" (May 15) demonstrates a very narrow view of orthodox Christian hamartiology (study of sin). In the measure of mankind's free will, predisposition does not equate with predetermination. A wide moral chasm exists between the propensity to act and the action itself. The traditional Christian approach to proclivity has been understanding and counsel while the answer to immoral action has been condemnation and censure.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Sound familiar? Your normally cheerful spouse has suddenly, and inexplicably, turned cranky and an otherwise pleasant day is fast becoming a scene from "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. " When you see those storm clouds gathering in your significant other's eyes, you might do well to give them some carbohydrates -- and fast. At least that's the advice of a team of researchers who examined the connection between low blood sugar levels and aggression in married couples. The paper , which was published Monday in PNAS, found that when blood glucose levels dropped, spouses were far more likely to stick pins into voodoo dolls representing their mates.
SPORTS
January 25, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Luis Suarez says he is a changed man. Whether that change is for better or worse he didn't specify. But when you spend the whole of training camp petulantly demanding a trade and are forced to sit out the first five games of the regular season because you bit an opponent, there's really only one way to go. "The last few months were a little difficult for me," the mercurial Liverpool striker said on the team's website earlier this month....
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
Cookie Monster was in the house! Everyone's favorite furry blue cookie lover stopped by our own Test Kitchen this morning to talk cookies (of course), fill us in on his new " Sesame Street " segment, and teach us a little about -- of all things -- self-control. "Sesame Street" begins its 44th season today, and Cookie Monster, one of its longtime stars, has appeared on the PBS children's program since its premiere in 1969. This season, Cookie Monster is starring in a new recurring feature called "Cookie's Crumby Pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
The 44th season of "Sesame Street" premiered Monday, and Cookie Monster made the trip out to L.A. to talk about it. Why Cookie Monster? Because Cookie Monster is starring in a new segment titled "Cookie's Crumby Pictures" that will put the blue-furred monster in parodies of several well-known films, including "The Karate Kid" and the James Bond pictures. Cookie Monster appeared in The Times' test kitchen to talk with test kitchen director Noelle Carter and staff writer Patrick Kevin Day about everything from healthful school lunches to learning a bit of self-control when it comes to eating cookies.
OPINION
July 10, 2011 | By Deborah MacInnis
Anytime a VIP gets caught with his (or her) pants down — Arnold Schwarzenegger or Anthony Weiner, for example — you can almost hear the collective "huh?" around the nation's water coolers, on its Twitter feeds and shared over its backyard fences. What in the heck were those guys thinking? Where were they when John Edwards, Eliot Spitzer, Bill Clinton and so many others crashed and burned? Why wasn't the very real risk of shame and humiliation enough to stop them cold? More than 2,000 years ago Socrates asserted in Plato's "Phaedrus" that two horses contend for our souls — one, unruly, passionate and constantly pulling in the direction of pleasure, and the other restrained, dutiful, obedient and governed by a sense of shame.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Will your toddler grow up to be a healthy, financially stable, drug-free human being? It all depends on self-control, a new study says. Signs of self-control in children as young as 3 could predict how successful that child would be as an adult, according to a paper published online Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The international team of researchers looked at 1,037 children in New Zealand born in the early 1970s, observing their levels of self-control at ages 3 and 5. At ages 5, 7, 9 and 11, the team used parent, teacher and the children's own feedback to measure such factors as impulsive aggression, hyperactivity, lack of persistence and inattention.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2011 | By Emily Green, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We Have Met the Enemy Self-Control in an Age of Excess Daniel Akst Penguin Press: 304 pp., $26.95 Daniel Akst borrowed his new book's title from "Pogo" creator Walt Kelly, whose "We have met the enemy and he is us" became a slogan marking the first Earth Day in 1970. However, in "We Have Met the Enemy: Self-Control in an Age of Excess," Akst isn't interested in saving the planet, at least as a first line of business. He's intrigued by impulse control in America, what is eroding it and what that means.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1986
I am writing in regard to the San Diego Unified School District's approval of the task force to study on-campus health clinics for high schools. I am vehemently opposed to what is going on. It appears that Supt. Tom Payzant and colleagues are pushing in that direction without considering the true general consensus of the people. Instead of making a moral stand, they are giving in to our young people's lack of sexual self-control. Providing health care services that dispense birth control is only attempting to put a Band-Aid on the real issue.
HEALTH
April 5, 2014 | Lily Dayton
Each time health psychologist Kelly McGonigal teaches her Science of Willpower class, she asks students to select a willpower challenge to focus on during the 10-week course. Though students' goals are diverse -- kicking nicotine or getting out of debt, controlling their temper or overcoming alcohol abuse -- there is one goal that is most common among the 200 or 300 students who pack the lecture hall seeking life change: They want to lose weight. "It's important to understand that everyone is struggling with something," says McGonigal, whose experience in the Stanford University course inspired her to write "The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It. " Beliefs about the role of willpower in weight loss have changed through the decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2010 | By Robert Faturechi
'Eyes closed, heads down. Focus on your breathing." The men in the sanctuary obediently followed their Buddhist chaplain's command, bowing their cleanly shaven heads and beginning their meditation exercises. A bell chime hung in the air before melting into silence. Most of the men were new to the relaxation technique, seeking to add a little Zen to their lives. But the venue for this course was not a posh studio in Silver Lake or Santa Monica. These men were trying to get in touch with their chi at Men's Central Jail.
SPORTS
February 10, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
The way this town embraces Phil Jackson is the way Pau Gasol embraced him last week after Jackson became the winningest coach in Lakers history. It was like he really wanted to, but he sort of couldn't. Does that make sense? Did you see it? Rich in symbolism, scarce in emotion, the scene was at once fascinating and unsettling. Immediately after the Lakers' victory over the Charlotte Bobcats, Gasol walked excitedly toward Jackson, then just stopped short. He tentatively stuck out his hand, Jackson tentatively grabbed it, then the two men briefly and awkwardly and barely embraced.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|