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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1993 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors in the Menendez brothers murder trial will be given instructions on self-defense that could lead to a reduced manslaughter verdict but not to outright acquittal, the judge in the case decided Monday--all but dashing defense hopes that the brothers might be exonerated. Van Nuys Superior Court Judge Stanley M.
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WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
A top leader of a vigilante "self-defense" group in the western state of Michoacan on Friday gave the Mexican government an ultimatum: free captured members of the movement by May 10 or expect all hell to break loose. Jose Manuel Mireles said if members are not freed by the deadline, his organization will block towns and roads throughout the state just west of Mexico City. He also reiterated his refusal to obey government orders to lay down weapons. There may be as many as 100 members in detention, as the government has sought to slowly dismantle the disparate organizations, Mireles said.
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NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Tevin Thompson told a rapt audience in a Jacksonville, Fla., courtroom about the fateful night over Thanksgiving break in 2012 when he and three friends were out on the town. They were in a Dodge Durango and had stopped for gum and cigarettes at a convenience store. A Volkswagen carrying Michael Dunn and his girlfriend pulled up close alongside the parked SUV. Dunn, 47 and white, asked the black teenagers in the SUV to turn down the loud music, Thompson, 19, testified Friday. Thompson said he turned down the volume but that fellow passenger Jordan Davis, 17, cursed and asked him to turn the music back up. "It was pretty loud," Thompson said.
WORLD
April 3, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Citizen "self-defense" groups that have emerged to fight off a ruthless drug cartel in the state of Michoacan should take steps to join the government security apparatus or disarm, Mexican officials said Thursday. Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said during a press conference in Morelia, the state capital, that government forces have gained the upper hand since thousands of troops and police officers swarmed the western state and arrested several "important criminals” associated with the Knights Templar drug cartel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992
I was surprised and dismayed to see that some of your readers (letters, Feb. 29 and Platform, March 1) viewed my comments (Feb. 21) regarding the law of self-defense as a condemnation of watch store owner Lance E. Thomas. Please set the record straight. I believe in self-defense. Indeed, Thomas may very well have been acting properly in defending himself and others. Nonetheless, as my remarks reflected, I think that it is important for the community to examine carefully any situation in which a person repeatedly kills others.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The leaders of the vigilante “self-defense” groups of Michoacan state have signed an agreement with the Mexican government that transforms them into an officially sanctioned security force, officials announced Monday. The self-defense groups sprang up last year to confront the Knights Templar drug cartel and moved aggressively this month into territory where the cartel held sway. In an effort to prevent a widespread conflagration, the Mexican government sent thousands of troops and federal police into the contested region, promising to finally go after cartel leaders and demanding that the self-defense forces disarm.
WORLD
April 3, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Citizen "self-defense" groups that have emerged to fight off a ruthless drug cartel in the state of Michoacan should take steps to join the government security apparatus or disarm, Mexican officials said Thursday. Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said during a press conference in Morelia, the state capital, that government forces have gained the upper hand since thousands of troops and police officers swarmed the western state and arrested several "important criminals” associated with the Knights Templar drug cartel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2013 | By Jason Wells and Lee Romney
The father of a 21-year-old man accused of fatally stabbing a Dodgers fan in San Francisco after a Giants game on Wednesday says his son was acting in self-defense. Michael Montgomery, of Lodi, who was taken into custody shortly after the incident, will be charged in the slaying of Jonathan Denver, 24, San Francisco police said Thursday. But in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle, his father said his son wielded his knife in self-defense only after "the kid that got stabbed" swung a chair, hitting Montgomery in the head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2010 | By Harriet Ryan
The trial of a Swedish hip-hop artist accused of killing a pedestrian who slapped his SUV began Wednesday with a defense attorney asserting that the late-night killing in a Hollywood crosswalk was self-defense. The lawyer said David Jassy, a 35-year-old songwriter and producer from Stockholm, got out of his rented vehicle and assaulted pedestrian John Osnes, a 55-year-old jazz pianist, because he feared for the safety of himself, his girlfriend and the SUV. "He finds himself confronted with an angry drunk who has been hitting his car," attorney Alec Rose said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Brittany Levine
A men's group is objecting to Glendale offering free self-defense classes to women only, saying the city is violating federal and state civil rights laws that protect against sexual discrimination. The National Coalition for Men outlined its opposition in a letter sent this month to city officials, the Glendale News-Press reported. For years, Glendale's Commission on the Status of Women has held self-defense classes in April on city property for women and girls in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A jury has found Michael Dunn, the Florida man accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, guilty of four charges, but the jury was unable to reach a decision on the top count, first-degree murder. Dunn, who is white, fired 10 shots into an SUV, killing Jordan Davis, 17, who was black. The shooting in a convenience store parking lot in Jacksonville erupted after Dunn asked the teenagers in the vehicle to turn down their music. Dunn was charged with first-degree murder, three counts of attempted second-degree murder and one count of firing into a vehicle in the Nov. 23, 2012, shooting.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Last year, after the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down Illinois' blanket ban on the carrying of “ready to use” guns outside the home, a Los Angeles Times editorial said this: “Even if it were affirmed by the Supreme Court, the 7th Circuit's decision probably wouldn't threaten most state laws that impose sensible restrictions on the carrying of firearms. (In California, applicants for a 'carry a concealed weapon' permit must prove that they are of 'good moral character,' have sufficient cause to carry a weapon and have received firearms training.)
NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A former Tampa police captain who has been jail since he fatally shot a man after a dispute over texting in a movie theater was denied bond on Friday. Following an acrimonious two-day hearing in Dade City, Fla., Judge Pat Siracusa, ruled that Curtis Reeves, 71, should continue to be held in jail where he has been since the Jan. 13 shooting. Reeves maintains he shot Chad Oulson, 43, in a movie theater in Wesley Chapel, Fla., in self-defense after an argument. "I have been doing this long enough to know whatever I say, there are people in this courtroom who will be unhappy," Siracusa said before handing down his decision.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Tevin Thompson told a rapt audience in a Jacksonville, Fla., courtroom about the fateful night over Thanksgiving break in 2012 when he and three friends were out on the town. They were in a Dodge Durango and had stopped for gum and cigarettes at a convenience store. A Volkswagen carrying Michael Dunn and his girlfriend pulled up close alongside the parked SUV. Dunn, 47 and white, asked the black teenagers in the SUV to turn down the loud music, Thompson, 19, testified Friday. Thompson said he turned down the volume but that fellow passenger Jordan Davis, 17, cursed and asked him to turn the music back up. "It was pretty loud," Thompson said.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The leaders of the vigilante “self-defense” groups of Michoacan state have signed an agreement with the Mexican government that transforms them into an officially sanctioned security force, officials announced Monday. The self-defense groups sprang up last year to confront the Knights Templar drug cartel and moved aggressively this month into territory where the cartel held sway. In an effort to prevent a widespread conflagration, the Mexican government sent thousands of troops and federal police into the contested region, promising to finally go after cartel leaders and demanding that the self-defense forces disarm.
WORLD
January 19, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
NUEVA ITALIA, Mexico - Father Patricio Madrigal Diaz was sitting in a big, empty church describing the moment the ragtag "self-defense" forces came barreling into town bearing AK-47s - and a promise to free this farming community from the suffocating grip of the drug cartel. The cleric was finishing Sunday Mass in a tiny stucco chapel north of town last week when his flock was alarmed by a rumble of tires. Some ran home. Others shut the church windows tight. " Se va a poner feo ," they told Father Patricio.
WORLD
January 14, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - Mexican troops and federal police poured into the state of Michoacan on Tuesday in an attempt to restore order after clashes with the rural "self-defense" groups that at times have been their allies against the Knights Templar drug cartel. The standoff with the vigilantes amounts to a policy and public relations nightmare for a federal government that has long accorded mythic status to the Mexican campesino who takes up arms to combat injustice. The Michoacan vigilantes have embraced the image, though there is widespread suspicion that at least some of the locals are secretly backed by rivals in the deadly drug game.
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