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Self Determination

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990
Your article on the Bush dinner focused on our eviction from the event, not upon what we said or our motivation for being there. Consequently, I would appreciate your publishing my comments which were made to President Bush. "Mr. President, self-determination is what the people of Central America want. Self-determination is what the people of Central America deserve. President Bush, you are an Episcopalian. I am an Episcopalian. You profess to be a man of God. I ask that you listen to our presiding bishop who has called for an end to all military aid to El Salvador."
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OPINION
December 13, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
To its credit, the Obama administration has condemned the crackdown on demonstrators in Ukraine and is suggesting that further repression might lead to economic sanctions. There are signs that international support for the protesters, who are calling for a closer relationship with Western Europe, may induce President Viktor Yanukovich to recommit to an association agreement with the European Union that he backed away from under pressure from Russia. Promising efforts also are underway to provide Ukraine with financial aid to enable it to close a deal with the EU. At the same time, U.S. officials are rightly emphasizing that Ukraine can honor its people's European aspirations without rejecting a harmonious relationship with Russia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1988
Kuttab, a Palestinian journalist living in Jerusalem, insists that the Palestinians of the West Bank and Gaza deserve self-determination. Perhaps the unacceptable question should be asked--why? Why do they deserve an option that is denied to the Basques, the Kurds, the Armenians, the Australian Aborigines, the American Indians? Because they rejected a Palestinian state when it was offered by the United Nations? Because they never sought a Palestinian state when the Ottoman Empire ruled the Mideast or when Jordan governed the West Bank and Egypt the Gaza Strip?
OPINION
September 22, 2011 | By Saree Makdisi
It goes without saying that Palestinians and Arabs are outraged by the idea that the United States is threatening to block recognition of a Palestinian state at the United Nations. What is less obvious, perhaps, is that some of the most vociferous critics of the Palestinian bid for upgraded U.N. recognition are Palestinians themselves. How could it be that advocates of Palestinian rights could be suspicious of, if not altogether opposed to, the U.N. gambit? Isn't the creation of an internationally recognized independent state the goal shared by all Palestinians?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1986
What right does the American government have to actively attempt to subvert and supplant, through military, diplomatic or economic means or a combination thereof, the government of a foreign nation? I thought that the right to self-determination was a basic and cherished premise of American democracy! Leave Nicaragua alone! JIM CASSIDY Los Angeles
OPINION
May 17, 1998
I appreciate The Times' coverage of the Mexican "draconian response" to civil rights observers of all persuasions in the beleaguered Chiapas province (May 9). But I must ask: Why are opposition forces described as "left wing," as the Zapatistas and their sympathizers inevitably are? Is it because they are seeking limited autonomy? Land reform? Self-determination? Would you describe our pre-Revolutionary War protesters or our Founding Fathers as "left wing"? It seems so utterly simplistic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1993
How much longer will the American people be fed the lie that Serbians are "invading" Bosnia to take away land that belongs to the Muslims? Before the war started, Serbians composed 34% of the population in Bosnia, and they privately owned 62% of the land. The Muslims accounted for 42% of the population and owned 25% of the land. These facts raise another question. Why is it that 1.8 million Muslims have the right of self-determination according to the Western World, but 2.5 million Serbs living in Bosnia and Croatia do not have that same right of self-determination?
NEWS
June 18, 1989
The Parliament of Slovenia, the most-developed of Yugoslavia's six republics, has adopted a constitutional amendment granting it the right to secede, news reports in Belgrade said. The amendment, passed Friday, states that the Slovenian people have "the lasting and inalienable right to self-determination, including the right to secession and association," the official Tanjug news agency said. It is considered unlikely that federal authorities in Belgrade would allow the northern republic to break away from the union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1987
Your editorial went to the heart of the Central American policy of this Administration--a policy of violence and North American supremacy. President Reagan's hypocrisy shows clearly in his support of brutal suppression by Central American regimes which are friendly, i.e., dependent on U.S. support while simultaneously denouncing the Nicaraguan government as "undemocratic." Reagan's agenda is U.S. domination--not his avowed concern for humanitarian and democratic issues. The people of the Americas and all the world deserve our support in their efforts at self-determination and peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1990
First Europe, then Nicaragua, as democracy finds a ready target among the oppressed. Cannot the civilized world turn its attention to the plight of Northern Ireland? That inequality and social strife are permitted to continue in this saddest of ghettos is made more poignant, given South Africa's ultimate realization that all people must be allowed a franchise for self-determination. To accommodate the political needs of the British government has long ago withered as sound reasoning to support this onerous political nightmare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
In 1908, Lt. Col. Allen Allensworth, a charismatic ex-slave and retired military man, set out to build an all-black community on a hardscrabble patch of land 40 miles north of Bakersfield. This weekend, the centennial of his long-shuttered town will be honored by thousands of Californians trooping to the site, now known as Colonel Allensworth State Historic Park.
SPORTS
April 9, 2008 | Chris Dufresne, Times Staff Writer
SAN ANTONIO -- Kansas guard Mario Chalmers was the hero of Monday night's national title victory against Memphis in overtime at the Alamodome. His three-point shot with 2.1 seconds left in regulation tied the score, 63-63, and gave Kansas the extra time it needed to pull off one of the most memorable comeback victories in NCAA tournament history. But the big winner of Monday's game is going to be Kansas Coach Bill Self, who before this tournament wore the label of "Mr. Can't Win The Big One."
OPINION
August 14, 2005 | Antonia Juhasz, ANTONIA JUHASZ is a scholar with the think tank Foreign Policy In Focus. Her book "The Bush Agenda: Invading the World, One Economy at a Time" will be published by Regan Books in 2006.
ON MONDAY, Iraq's National Assembly will release a draft constitution to be voted on by the people in two months. Since February, vital issues have been debated and discussed by the drafting committee: the role of Islamic law, the rights of women, the autonomy of the Kurds and the participation of the minority Sunnis. But what hasn't been on the table is at least as important to the formation of a new Iraq: the country's economic structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2005 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
He's 6 feet 3, 190 pounds and ripped all over. John Basedow is his name, and if you watch any television at all, you've probably seen his washboard stomach, pumped-up chest and Popeye biceps -- all of which he peacocks in endlessly airing commercials touting his "Fitness Made Simple" exercise videos. Flip on the tube morning, noon or night, and there he is before a flaming backdrop, talking up his "45-Minute Fat Burning Workout" or doing crunches to maintain his "Six-Pack Abs."
OPINION
August 12, 2002
Re "As Kashmir Boils, Keep Heat on Pakistan," Commentary, Aug. 7: Selig Harrison is so off the mark when he advises the Bush administration to "get Pakistan to keep its hands off" Kashmir as a means of finally resolving the Kashmir issue. Whether Pakistan can do more to stop "infiltration" by militants has less to do with resolving the 55-year-old Kashmir conflict than whether India can admit that a problem of national self-determination cannot be solved by military force, no matter how overwhelming and how brutal.
OPINION
December 17, 2000 | Susan Blaustein, Susan Blaustein is a freelance writer and senior consultant for the International Crisis Group
In its understandable rush to embrace Belgrade after the ouster of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic in October, the West has all but abandoned its friends in Montenegro and Kosovo as they attempt to redefine their respective relationships to Serbia and the new Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986
While Hank Tovar is correct concerning the upside-down status of the Texas flag in the Senor Naugles commercial (Calendar Letters, July 20), both he and the Naugles people are incorrect in assuming that the Star and Bars ever flew over the Alamo. The flag raised over the Alamo by its defenders was the Mexican tricolor with the Eagle-Serpent-Cactus crest replaced by the date "1824," commemorating the Constitution of 1824, which theoretically gave the Texicana self-determination.
NEWS
October 7, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethnic Albanians in Kosovo rejoiced Friday that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, a hated figure here, has fallen from power--even though many fear that his departure may delay their dream of independence. "It's more difficult to be independent without Milosevic, because [President-elect Vojislav] Kostunica looks like a democratic leader. He's not, but he looks like it," said local businessman Blerim Gerbeshi, 24. "With Milosevic in power, I think we would become independent faster."
OPINION
May 21, 2000 | MANSOOR IJAZ, Mansoor Ijaz, a nuclear physicist of Pakistani descent, is chairman of an investment firm in New York
When approaching Srinagar, capital of this disputed Himalayan state, one has the unmistakable impression of coming to paradise on Earth. Buttressed by jagged snow-capped mountains that have been called the roof of the world, the Kashmir valley is a breathtaking mosaic of towering pines, glistening lakes and flowing streams. On the ground, however, reality is quite different. The dispute over Kashmir always has boiled down to the fate of the people in its valley, controlled by India.
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