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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996
You report a marked trend toward self-employment and draw political conclusions from this trend ("The New Politics of Going Solo," May 3). Yet the official figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate that the work force is dominated by wage and salary workers (91.5% of the total), a group whose proportion of employment has risen during the 1980s and 1990s. As a fraction of the work force, self-employment showed a slight upward creep during 1979-94. But last year the proportion and absolute number of self-employed declined (to 8.4% and 10.5 million, respectively)
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BUSINESS
December 21, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
California's unemployment fell below 10% in November for the first time in almost four years, thanks in part to a holiday hiring surge by retailers. The jobless rate fell to 9.8% from 10.1% in October, according to data in an overall jobs report released Friday by the state Employment Development Department. The drop in the unemployment rate, based on a survey of households, came even as a separate payroll survey found that employers shed a net 3,800 jobs in California, according to the report.
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NEWS
April 12, 1995 | from Associated Press
Expressing regret that he lacks the power to veto elements of legislation, President Clinton signed into law Tuesday a bill giving self-employed people the right to deduct health insurance costs from their taxes. His objection: The bill gives media mogul Rupert Murdoch a huge tax break. "If we'd had the line-item veto it would have been a different story," Clinton said. The new law permits some 3.2 million people to claim a 25% deduction for health insurance premiums they paid in 1994.
HEALTH
April 20, 2012 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My wife and I arrived as legal immigrants from Canada four years ago at the age of 63 to be closer to our three children. Having lived in Canada most of our lives, we never contributed to Medicare. Right now I am self-employed and have a small-business health plan through Kaiser. The premiums have escalated from $450 per month to $1,228 per month, with a very high deductible. I am afraid we may have to return to Canada, where we enjoyed free health care. I am sure that many parents who join their children in the U.S. are in the same situation and would like to know what other options are available.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The death of health care reform efforts this year may deal an unexpected blow to millions of self-employed Americans, who are now expected to lose--at least temporarily--a lucrative tax deduction for health insurance expenses. The lost deduction, which allowed self-employed individuals to deduct up to 25% of the cost of their health insurance premiums, could force them to pay hundreds of dollars in additional taxes or cancel their coverage.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1995 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of small-business owners who have been holding on to their 1994 income tax forms until the last minute, it was apparently worth the wait. The House and Senate have agreed to permanently restore a deduction for the health insurance premiums paid by the self-employed. Though it had been renewed annually since 1986, the deduction died last year after becoming mired in President Clinton's health care proposals.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL
A year ago, Santa Ana Unified School District psychologist Sharon Skill was wrestling with a dilemma: stay in a profession for which she had trained and invested 13 years, or chuck it all for the uncertainties of self-employment during a terrible recession?
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House approved legislation Tuesday to help the nation's self-employed buy health insurance but the proposal's strong bipartisan support was overshadowed by a racially charged debate over how to pay for it. By a vote of 381 to 44, the House agreed to reinstate an expired provision in the tax code that allows the self-employed to deduct 25% of the cost of their health insurance premiums from their taxes.
NEWS
March 25, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved legislation Friday that would grant self-employed Americans a 30% tax deduction on their health insurance premiums, in the first of what is likely be a series of health care reform bills aimed at broadening coverage or controlling costs. By a voice vote, the Senate revived a tax code provision that expired in 1993, a move that will benefit about 9 million Americans--primarily small-business owners and farm families.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2008 | Cyndia Zwahlen, Special to The Times
Whether a traditional fine-arts painter, a hip-hop songwriter, a choreographer or a skilled potter, the "artrepreneur" has to follow many of the same steps as other small-business owners to reach a wider audience -- and to be paid enough for doing so. A local arts group offers a road map in its new resource guide, "Business of Art: An Artist's Guide to Profitable Self-Employment." The 265-page soft-cover publication is based on a popular seven-week entrepreneur-training workshop offered by the organization, the Los Angeles-based nonprofit Center for Cultural Innovation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Anh Van never intended to have children. So when she went to the doctor for what she believed was the flu, she was surprised to discover she was pregnant. Then she got another shock: Her private insurance didn't include maternity care. Van, who has insulin-dependent diabetes, called several companies but couldn't find anyone willing to cover her pregnancy.  "Every insurance company we called basically denied us," said her husband, Brian Huh. "It was pretty appalling. " Although HMOs and employer-based insurance policies in California are required to include maternity care, individual policies are not. That leaves women who are self-employed or not covered at work with few options, including paying out of pocket for pregnancy and childbirth costs.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2011 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I'm 25 and trying to maximize my tax savings and retirement contributions. I currently have two jobs: One is the typical salaried position with taxes withheld where I earn $45,000 a year, while the other is self-employed work I do on the side that grosses about $7,000 a year. Currently I have a Roth IRA that I max out and a 401(k) that gets the equivalent of 13% of my salary when combined with my employer's contribution. Given that I don't get a refund on April 15 and end up having to pony up a lot of money, is there a way for me to set aside my self-employment income into a retirement account such that I can just bypass all taxes on it, including payroll taxes?
BUSINESS
May 15, 2011 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
If you're self employed and yearning to shelter some of your income from taxes, you probably know all about SEP-IRAs, the retirement plan for small-business owners. But do you know about so-called solo 401(k)s? Probably not, unless you can afford to put a substantial amount of your income into tax-sheltered accounts. If you do, solo 401(k)s can offer some advantages. "They give you a lot more options," said Stuart Robertson, head of ShareBuilder 401k, a subsidiary of ING Direct.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2011 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: I'm self-employed and make $20,000 a year. The tax lady calculated that I owe $1,600. Can this be right? Answer: Self-employment income is subject to both income tax and self-employment tax. Ordinary income can be reduced by standard deductions and exemptions, but income subject to self-employment tax cannot, said Donald Lucove, a CPA with Lucove, Say & Co. in Calabasas. "The self-employment tax is calculated using 92.35% of self-employment income at 15.3%," he said.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2011 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I'm 50 and self-employed. I am trying to save as much as possible for retirement. I've put the maximum allowable in my IRA ($6,000). What else can I do? Would contributing to a Roth at this age be advisable? What other options are out there? Answer: You're lucky — you actually have more options to save for retirement than people who don't own their businesses, if you can spare the cash to make significant contributions. You can contribute up to $14,000 annually to a SIMPLE IRA (the limit is $11,500 for people under 50)
BUSINESS
March 27, 2011 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
Welcome to tax season ? the most dreaded time of year. It's not just that preparing a tax return is time-consuming and costly ? although it's clearly both. The Internal Revenue Service estimates that it takes roughly 23 hours and costs about $300, on average, to compile and file a Form 1040. There is also the stress of not knowing whether you've claimed all of the deductions and credits you're due, or made some dumb mistake that could have tax authorities on your tail. "If we go too small we feel cheated and resentful, and if we claim too much we may feel jittery and anxious, looking over our shoulder for the tax man in the trench coat," said Brad Klontz, a financial psychologist and co-author of "Mind Over Money: Overcoming the Money Disorders That Threaten Our Financial Health.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlene Gibson believed that if anyone could start her own business, it was she. After all, Gibson had headed Cypress College's Training and Economic Development office, which educated would-be entrepreneurs. When the college eliminated the program in 1991, Gibson decided to provide the services herself. "I had the contacts and had done the groundwork," she recalls. But it soon became clear that she didn't have everything it takes to be an entrepreneur.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2010 | Liz Pulliam Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: My 74-year-old mother was laid off from her full-time job in May. My siblings and I were horrified to learn that she owes $41,000 on 12 credit cards with interest rates ranging from 9.9% to 29.9%. None of the issuing banks is willing to lower her interest rates. With her Social Security benefits and unemployment, she is just barely getting by, but unable to afford more than her minimum payments on the credit cards. She does not own a home and rents a duplex for $650 a month.
NEWS
April 19, 2010 | Sharon Bernstein, Ann M. Simmons and Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
The health insurance overhaul signed into law last month has been billed as the most sweeping reform in generations. And it is. In broad strokes, the law provides tax credits for small businesses that offer health insurance, and subsidies for people who buy it for themselves. More people will be eligible for Medicaid, and insurers won't be able to charge more for those with preexisting conditions. But when it comes down to how the law mixes with the variables of everyday life, things get complicated.
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