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Self Help Graphics

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
For many people in East Los Angeles, Self Help Graphics is more than a community arts center, it's an institution. The building on Cesar E. Chavez Avenue, with its distinctive murals, has for years housed a printmaking shop that served as one of the early incubators for the Chicano art movement in California. Many noted artists who launched their careers there remain active, visible members of the community.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Time
Inside the old mosaic-covered building housing Self Help Graphics & Art, the packing has begun ? of the angels and the devils, of the colorful skulls, of the masked lucha libre wrestlers. Thousands of prints collected over four decades are headed to a new home, as the East Los Angeles art center known for shaping the city's most successful Chicano artists ? Frank Romero, Patssi Valdez, Gronk ? prepares to leave its longtime home at East Cesar Chavez and North Gage avenues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2001 | KINNEY LITTLEFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Self-Help Graphics' vibrant inks have left a lasting imprint. For 28 years, the acclaimed nonprofit arts center has been a mecca of fine printmaking in East Los Angeles, a nexus of Chicano pride and artistic endeavor. It will share its wealth with the Orange County Center for Contemporary Art in Santa Ana, when the high-energy exhibition "Inspiring Heroes" opens July 7.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2009 | City News Service
A nonprofit Chicano arts center in East Los Angeles will get to stay in its landmark location for at least one more year, but it will have to pay rent. Board members of the Self Help Graphics & Art cultural center at 3802 Cesar Chavez Ave. have negotiated what they described as a "favorable lease agreement" with the building's new owner, Piedmont Investment Co., according to a statement Tuesday from Self Help. The agreement calls for Piedmont, which bought the building last year, to upgrade and renovate the building.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2009 | City News Service
A nonprofit Chicano arts center in East Los Angeles will get to stay in its landmark location for at least one more year, but it will have to pay rent. Board members of the Self Help Graphics & Art cultural center at 3802 Cesar Chavez Ave. have negotiated what they described as a "favorable lease agreement" with the building's new owner, Piedmont Investment Co., according to a statement Tuesday from Self Help. The agreement calls for Piedmont, which bought the building last year, to upgrade and renovate the building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sister Karen Boccalero, the Franciscan nun who founded Self-Help Graphics in an East Los Angeles garage and turned it into a showcase and training ground for some of the nation's most important Latino artists, died Tuesday. She was 64. A silk-screen artist and painter, Boccalero and a group of Chicano artists founded the center and gallery in 1971. The center provided teaching jobs, studio space and early public exhibitions for such artists as Gronk, Frank Romero, Patssi Valdez and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1997 | ROBERTO BEDOYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Roberto Bedoya is executive director of the National Assn. of Artists' Organizations in Washington, D.C
Sister Karen Boccalero, who co-founded Self-Help Graphics in East Los Angeles in 1971, died June 24, apparently of a heart attack. She was 64. Calendar asked a writer and arts administrator for his thoughts on her life's work--building a showcase and training ground for some of the nation's most important Chicano artists. * Reputations travel like good chisme.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Mexico's indigenous art was ferociously intense--from its pre-Columbian temples to its heroic revolutionary muralists and satirical popular artists. Mexican American artists inherited this heartfelt engagement with the realities of the spirit but gave it their own twist. The resulting aesthetic is seen in the Laguna Art Museum exhibition "Across the Street: Self-Help Graphics and Chicano Art in Los Angeles."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Art Museum curator Bolton Colburn sensed something uniquely vital the moment he entered Self-Help Graphics. The community-based art center in East Los Angeles, born of the tumultuous Chicano rights movement of the 1960s, was founded to nurture the careers of young Latino artists via workshops, exhibitions and free access to professional silk-screen printing facilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008 | Agustin Gurza
When last we left our embattled arts activists at Self Help Graphics, they were on the verge of eviction from their longtime headquarters in East L.A. Even some true believers were ready to count out the struggling community-based institution that has been a beacon for Chicano art for almost four decades. But the group is still alive and kicking as it prepares for its biggest event of the year, the Day of the Dead on Nov. 2, with a display of colorful altars, a procession and a concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2008 | Agustin Gurza
When last we left our embattled arts activists at Self Help Graphics, they were on the verge of eviction from their longtime headquarters in East L.A. Even some true believers were ready to count out the struggling community-based institution that has been a beacon for Chicano art for almost four decades. But the group is still alive and kicking as it prepares for its biggest event of the year, the Day of the Dead on Nov. 2, with a display of colorful altars, a procession and a concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2008 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Supporters of Self Help Graphics, the historic East L.A. arts center, got a little sanctimonious last week when they learned that the building they had occupied rent-free for decades had been sold by their landlord and longtime benefactors, the Sisters of St. Francis. How could those nuns pull the rug out from under them like that, without notice? The art agency's board president, Armando Duron, even suggested that the leader of the Catholic order should go to confession for the alleged duplicity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2008 | Hector Becerra and Esmeralda Bermudez, Times Staff Writers
In the early 1970s, a Franciscan nun turned an East Los Angeles garage into a thriving cultural center that gave rise to some of the city's most successful Latino artists. Self Help Graphics & Art later moved into a 1920s-era building on Cesar Chavez Avenue that would become distinctive for its mosaic-covered facade. Artists such as Gronk, Frank Romero and Barbara Carrasco exhibited their work and taught at the center. Sister Karen Boccalero, its founder, became a patron of the East L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2008 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
ARMANDO DURON rushes out of court one day last week after dispatching another divorce case in his lucrative family law practice. The silver-haired lawyer and art collector is running late for a noon appointment, but not at some chic downtown restaurant. He's heading to East Los Angeles, where he spends his spare time trying to rescue the chronically struggling community arts collective Self Help Graphics. The agency on Cesar Chavez Avenue, considered the heart of the Chicano art scene, was close to closing its doors three years ago when Duron decided to volunteer to help turn it around.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2007 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
When the topic turned to Self Help Graphics, East L.A.'s revered but perennially struggling cultural center, it seemed as if nobody talked about creating art. For years, the talk had been all about survival -- meager budgets, debilitating debt, mass board resignations and Sisyphean drives for new funds. But there's a feisty, chain-smoking ghost who inhabits the agency's decrepit building on Cesar E. Chavez Avenue and who doesn't get bogged down in the bottom line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Self Help Graphics, an East Los Angeles arts center that has struggled for its life for the last year and recently lost its executive director, has temporarily closed. Leaders of the nonprofit organization say a financial shortfall precipitated the closure and that Self Help will reopen as soon as funding is secured and the administration restructured. "We are optimistic that a number of grants from major funders will be forthcoming," said Oralia Michel, a member of the board of directors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Self Help Graphics, an East Los Angeles arts center that has struggled for its life for the last year and recently lost its executive director, has temporarily closed. Leaders of the nonprofit organization say a financial shortfall precipitated the closure and that Self Help will reopen as soon as funding is secured and the administration restructured. "We are optimistic that a number of grants from major funders will be forthcoming," said Oralia Michel, a member of the board of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2005 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
The lights are out in an area of the second floor at Self Help Graphics & Art, East L.A.'s pioneering nonprofit that has been a beacon for Latino artists for more than three decades. During the recent storms, leaks bedeviled the landmark building on Cesar Chavez Avenue, frying electrical circuits and eating away at walls and ceilings from the roof to the first-floor gift store.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2005 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
The lights are out in an area of the second floor at Self Help Graphics & Art, East L.A.'s pioneering nonprofit that has been a beacon for Latino artists for more than three decades. During the recent storms, leaks bedeviled the landmark building on Cesar Chavez Avenue, frying electrical circuits and eating away at walls and ceilings from the roof to the first-floor gift store.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
For many people in East Los Angeles, Self Help Graphics is more than a community arts center, it's an institution. The building on Cesar E. Chavez Avenue, with its distinctive murals, has for years housed a printmaking shop that served as one of the early incubators for the Chicano art movement in California. Many noted artists who launched their careers there remain active, visible members of the community.
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