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Self Help Industry

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NEWS
July 1, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a fateful day in 1935, a stockbroker from New York and a surgeon from Akron, Ohio--both mired in lifelong alcoholism--decided to find a way for alcoholics to help other alcoholics get sober, one day at a time. This weekend, on the 60th anniversary of the improbable meeting between Bill Wilson and Dr.
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NATIONAL
June 22, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A jury in Arizona convicted a bestselling author and self-help guru Wednesday in the deaths of three clients during a sweat lodge ceremony in 2009 that was intended to help participants overcome adversity to reach their full potential. After hearing four months of testimony, the eight-man, four-woman jury deliberated for fewer than 12 hours before finding James Arthur Ray guilty of three counts of negligent homicide. The panel acquitted Ray of the more serious charges of manslaughter.
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NATIONAL
June 22, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A jury in Arizona convicted a bestselling author and self-help guru Wednesday in the deaths of three clients during a sweat lodge ceremony in 2009 that was intended to help participants overcome adversity to reach their full potential. After hearing four months of testimony, the eight-man, four-woman jury deliberated for fewer than 12 hours before finding James Arthur Ray guilty of three counts of negligent homicide. The panel acquitted Ray of the more serious charges of manslaughter.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a fateful day in 1935, a stockbroker from New York and a surgeon from Akron, Ohio--both mired in lifelong alcoholism--decided to find a way for alcoholics to help other alcoholics get sober, one day at a time. This weekend, on the 60th anniversary of the improbable meeting between Bill Wilson and Dr.
BOOKS
June 25, 1995 | Torie Osborn, Torie Osborn is the former director of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Community Services Center
"Outing Yourself" is a self-help manual, a 14-step program to guide gay men and lesbians along the coming-out journey. Given the forever-burgeoning self-help industry, this book was inevitable. The big surprise, though, is that its author is none other than the "king of outing" himself, Michelangelo Signorile, recently seen snarling in now-defunct Outweek magazine about Malcolm Forbes' late-night gay partying and on talk-shows promoting his first book, "Queer in America."
NATIONAL
October 22, 2009 | Scott Kraft
The story that self-help guru James Arthur Ray loves to tell his new audiences is a modern-day parable, a tale of overcoming adversity. The key character: James Arthur Ray. In 2000, he was living in a house on Mount Soledad in La Jolla ("higher than Deepak Chopra's," he says) with ocean views from seven rooms. "I was carried away with myself," he told 300 listeners on a chilly night in Denver this week. Then, a stock market plunge wiped out half his assets. His live-in girlfriend moved out and demanded half of what was left.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2010 | By Rob Weinert-Kendt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If the dysfunctional, self-medicating characters that populate so much 20th-century drama were to check into rehab or get therapy, would they still be stage-worthy? Eugene O'Neill didn't write "Long Day's Journey Into Recovery" or Tennessee Williams "A Streetcar Named Wellness." But professional help seems the only recourse for Claire, the mother grieving for a dead child in Beth Henley's "Family Week," opening Tuesday at off-Broadway's Lucille Lortel Theatre. The play is set at an isolated recovery center called Pastures, and in Henley fashion it is a comedy about grief, addiction, domestic violence and the specter of suicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2008 | Nicky Loomis, Times Staff Writer
It's an author's dream come true -- making the bestseller list week after week, traveling on a multi-city book tour and relishing in a bit of literary fame. For Steven Carter, an L.A.-based self-help author, that dream has come true -- only in Brazil.
NEWS
January 2, 2008 | Eric Weiner, Eric Weiner is the author of "The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World."
A new year is upon us, and the self-help industrial complex is in full swing, pestering us to slim down, bulk up, become a new you, a better you, a happier you. Yes, it's all about you. The 1970s may have been the Me Decade, but the naught years are shaping up to be the You Decade. There is, it turns out, little difference between You and Me. Both outlooks reflect a firmly held and particularly American belief that happiness lies deep inside the inner you, or me, or whatever.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1990 | LISA PERLMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Soft classical music plays from an overhead sound system in the offices of Mind Communication Inc. as telephone operators take orders for the company's subliminal self-help audio- and videocassettes. It may seem that they are hearing Mozart, but the 40 employees are test subjects for the company's theory that subliminal suggestions offer an easy way to improve people's lives. The music masks suggestions designed to motivate the employees to overcome procrastination and to be more productive.
MAGAZINE
July 9, 2006 | Charlie Schroeder, Charlie Schroeder, an actor and radio producer, has written for Hemispheres, Southland Golf and Modern Humorist.
From an early age I have taken it for granted that, like my grandparents, I would die really, really old. There's absolutely no reason, barring a lightning strike on the back nine, to imagine otherwise. But Gary Small thinks I'm wrong. "It's not all genetics," he tells me in a voice as soothing as a scented candle. "A large portion of how the brain ages comes from nongenetic factors." I'm hanging out on a spring evening with Dr.
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