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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2005 | Deborah Netburn, Special to The Times
We'll call this one Cupid because, with his golden curls and wide-eyed cherubic face, it seems like a decent handle. He's 26, fresh out of the military and, despite his Abercrombie good looks, he tends to panic when he talks to girls. "I'm totally an introvert," he says early on a Friday evening. But now it's into the wee hours of Saturday morning and he's at the Saddle Ranch on the Sunset Strip.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Some girls choose soccer or cheerleading. Ivy Wolk chose roller derby. "This is it, this is for me," the petite, wide-eyed 9-year-old said to her mom the first time she saw the Los Angeles Derby Dolls hit the track, and one another, two years ago. Split lips, black eyes, rink rash and bruises are trophies here. "It's not child abuse, it's derby," she once told her mother, who made sure she alerted her daughter's pediatrician about the girl's newfound love for the sport. "There have literally been days where I have been like, 'I must be crazy.' But she just picks herself up and gets back out there," said her mother, Tracy Wolk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, Terry Pristin is a Times staff writer. and
Wearing feathers in her hair, spike heels and a strapless evening gown, Marianne Williamson, New Age guru of the hour, is seated on a hotel ballroom stage in Marina del Rey, shoulder to shoulder with unmarried soap opera actors and other eligible and glamorous singles. Amid much banter and giggling, they will be "auctioned off" by talk-show host Cyndy Garvey and producer-director Garry Marshall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2012 | Larry Harnisch, Los Angeles Times
Of all the scam artists to set foot in Los Angeles, one of the most notorious was A. Victor Segno, who duped thousands of people around the world into sending him $1 a month to belong to his Segno Success Club. In return, he promised to send out brain waves twice a day to help members achieve success. Some ideas never die. In fact, a century after he carried out his scheme, the beguiling con man still can hook people. Stamp expert Ed Grabowski, a retired chemist from New Jersey, is proof.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1993 | BERT ELJERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The eight children happily greeted Julie Laguna as she stepped inside Santiago and Celia Hernandez's two-bedroom apartment on 6th Street. "Hi, maestra !" said 3-year-old Santiago Jr., the younger of two boys in the family, referring to Laguna as teacher. From a living room sofa, Hernandez, 45, and wife Celia, 48, watched as their children--seated at the family table--presented Laguna, a tutor, with their homework from the previous week. Six children are of school age but Santiago Jr.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The seminar has just begun, and Anthony J. Robbins is on a roll. "How many of you have ever had a business idea, or an idea for a gadget that you thought everyone in the world would use?" Robbins' voice is a rapid baritone, his tone that of a pumped-up cheerleader. His eyes scan the crowd. "How many of you, six months later, have walked into a store, and someone had stolen it? There was your gadget, right on the shelf!" Eyes flutter in confirmation. Heads nod. Shoulders slump.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her broad face red and sweaty, her stubby blond pigtails bouncing wildly, Marina Bosenko, 39, jumped and kicked her way through the hourlong exercise class, keeping her eyes fixed on her instructor's trim body. "I want to be pretty," she said during a pause, "and to look good so I won't have complexes. I want to be able to wear short skirts instead of special clothes for heavy women. I want to look like Natasha." Her role model, exercise teacher Natasha Yakosheva, understood perfectly.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | WILLIAM KISSEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rich Dyer, a onetime nuclear foreman for the Department of Defense, tried to bury his former wife alive after she was granted custody of the couple's two children. He's serving a life sentence at the state prison here. Angelo Pleasant, a former wrestler, shot and killed two of his coaches when he caught them arguing over a woman. He's serving two life sentences. But Dyer and Pleasant do more than serve time.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | KAREN NEWELL YOUNG
As Shakespeare put it, the world is a stage, and we are the cast of thousands. That's the idea behind Jessica Stuart's acting classes at the Grove Theatre Company. She wants to help non-actors perform on the stage of everyday life. Most of the students who take her acting classes are not actors, nor do they wish to be. They want to learn acting techniques to enhance their lives and perhaps learn a thing or two about their personalities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN
Greta Garbo was a follower of Krishnamurti, the late Indian philosopher who spent part of his time in Ojai, and it may have been his influence that caused her to abandon her movie career. Eastern mysticism also held a fascination for Aldous Huxley and Christopher Isherwood. After meeting a psychic who predicted the attack on Pearl Harbor, Mae West developed a deep interest in metaphysics and would invite friends to her house for demonstrations of ESP. Jayne Mansfield and Sammy Davis Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2012 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Free Will Sam Harris Free Press: 85 pp., $9.99 paper Religion for Atheists Alain de Botton Pantheon: 320 pp., $26.95 Once upon a time I took a degree in philosophy at the University of Cambridge. One of my tutors was Don Cupitt, a philosopher and radical theologian who challenged the doctrine that Jesus was God incarnate; Cupitt, though a priest himself, questioned the entire theistic notion of God. If God isn't God, one might think, then what's the point of him?
SPORTS
October 3, 2011 | By Gary Klein
USC's next game is not until Oct. 13, so the Trojans won't spend a lot of time this week preparing for California. Instead, when the Trojans resume practice Tuesday, they will turn inward. "The next couple days will be all about us, about making sure we're improving and we're figuring out our deficiencies and getting better at those," Coach Lane Kiffin said Monday. The biggest deficiency has been the defense. Two weeks ago, an interception that was returned for a touchdown by Arizona State helped the Sun Devils score 43 points against the Trojans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Tony Robbins, the multimillionaire "Father of the Coaching Industry," to use his own phrase, has a reality show, "Breakthrough With Tony Robbins," premiering Tuesday on NBC. (The network describes the series as "six one-hour specials.") It is not, except incidentally, an infomercial, Robbins' customary form of televisual expression, but rather a stunt-filled life-makeover show in which Tony — you don't mind if I call him Tony? — helps "families in crisis" work through their problems in colorful ways that look good on TV. And in only 30 days.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010 | By Jon Caramanica
It's a good time to be a celebrity in search of a little self-improvement: humbling via reality television has moved past the curious novelty phase into a full-blown component of career reinvention. Liked the actress? You'll love the addict. Nowhere are these reinventors more welcome than VH1, which has cultivated a pair of franchises around the theme: "Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew" (10 p.m. Thursdays) and "Celebrity Fit Club: Boot Camp" (9 p.m. Mondays). Some celebrities probably could have gone either way. Two current "Fit Club" cast members, Bobby Brown and Nicole Eggert, appear to have issues with alcohol, though it's largely discussed with them in terms of empty calories.
NEWS
January 5, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
"WE all feel like we could have done better tonight, so we're going to try one more time," Wolf Parade guitarist Dante Decaro said Tuesday, introducing the band's encore at El Rey Theatre. Not many bands are up for playing the humility card, especially a new indie-rock band-with-a-buzz making its big Los Angeles concert debut in front of a packed house.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2005 | Deborah Netburn, Special to The Times
We'll call this one Cupid because, with his golden curls and wide-eyed cherubic face, it seems like a decent handle. He's 26, fresh out of the military and, despite his Abercrombie good looks, he tends to panic when he talks to girls. "I'm totally an introvert," he says early on a Friday evening. But now it's into the wee hours of Saturday morning and he's at the Saddle Ranch on the Sunset Strip.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
In his five-week vocal workshop, voice teacher Buddy Mix never teaches his student rockers and poppers how to sing. But how to dress for an audience. "If you don't have a body like an athlete, don't wear tight clothes," Mix counsels. He usually is trendy in shapeless jackets and oversize shirts above baggy pants because physically he's more B.J. Thomas than O.J. Simpson. "Go with who you are, not who you'd like to be and don't put a sock in your pocket because there's only one Tom Jones.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy was 10 minutes into her weekly co-dependency group before she realized she was at the wrong meeting. Instead of a group for people with eating disorders, the 42-year-old writer for public television in New York was surrounded by adults who were habitually messy. "I got there late, and evidently they had changed rooms," she said. "What was upsetting was that there were several other people from my eating group, but they hadn't noticed either, because the vocabulary was the same."
NEWS
February 24, 2004 | Joe Robinson, Special to The Times
With the casualty rate mounting from local residents setting out alone into the wilds of Southern California, it's clear that something must be done. It's time to ban solo driving and institute mandatory carpools to protect solitary motorists from the hazardous roads and freeways of the urban jungle. There are about 60 fatalities in motor vehicle collisions in the Southland each month, compared with eight wilderness-related deaths last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2001
Re "Stumped by the X Factor," June 6: Your story on algebra brought back memories for me. When I learned I had to take a year of algebra at Santa Monica High School (back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth), I was terrified. I was abysmal in math, horrible, beyond horrible--I once got 52 fraction problems wrong out of 54, and the only thing my teacher wondered was how I got two right. So when I learned I'd have to take algebra, I went to the Santa Monica Library, checked out every possible book on algebra, went home and throughout that summer badgered my brilliant older brother to tutor me. He did. The next year, under the compassionate and competent teaching of Mr. Caballero (who also taught my brother)
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