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Self Injury

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The teenager tugs at the sleeves of her oversized sweatshirt and pulls them over her hands. She wants to make certain that the scars on her arms do not show. "You don't want people to know," said 14-year-old Danielle Opremcak. "People who cut themselves feel really guilty and ashamed afterward. You're not proud of it." Danielle knows. For three years, she has repeatedly sliced her arms and legs with razor blades and pieces of glass. The ritual of self-injury began as an attempt to gain the attention of her parents, Danielle said.
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NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
By ninth grade, 19% of girls -- almost one in five --own up to hurting themselves intentionally, mostly by cutting or carving their skin, but also by burning, biting, cutting or hitting themselves. Some report they will throw themselves against sharp objects or pull their own hair to cause pain. That's more than three times higher than the rate of self-injury among ninth grade boys. But self-injurious behavior, which increasingly is seen as a silent cry of emotional pain, is not unique to teenage girls: 7.6% of third graders -- 8- and 9-year-old boys and girls -- also reported to researchers that they intentionally harm themselves.
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NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
By ninth grade, 19% of girls -- almost one in five --own up to hurting themselves intentionally, mostly by cutting or carving their skin, but also by burning, biting, cutting or hitting themselves. Some report they will throw themselves against sharp objects or pull their own hair to cause pain. That's more than three times higher than the rate of self-injury among ninth grade boys. But self-injurious behavior, which increasingly is seen as a silent cry of emotional pain, is not unique to teenage girls: 7.6% of third graders -- 8- and 9-year-old boys and girls -- also reported to researchers that they intentionally harm themselves.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Maybe it's time to take a deep breath. The recent study about an increase in the number of YouTube videos of teens and young adults who cut or injure themselves has given rise to many headlines and, thus, much worry. But the study didn't say children who watch these videos will engage in such self-destructive acts. Dr. Keith Ablow writes in "The Truth About YouTube Videos and Self-Injury" : "As a psychiatrist who has treated a few hundred patients who cut themselves or burned themselves repeatedly, however, I don’t think the YouTube videos are likely to spark any epidemic of self-injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1987
Washington is boycotting a United Nations conference to trace the relationship, if any, between what the world spends on arms and what it needs to invest in economic development. The snub is a national disgrace that virtually guarantees that Washington's worst fears will come true. The State Department thinks the agenda of the meeting that started Monday in New York stacks the deck against the West.
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
YouTube videos that show teens deliberately cutting and injuring themselves are viewed by millions of online watchers -- something a new study suggests might make these disturbing acts seem mainstream and normal. The study, published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, notes that nonsuicidal self-injury -- cutting or physically hurting oneself in some way -- consistently appears in about 14% to 24% percent of children, teens and young adults. Researchers studied the top 100 videos of such acts on YouTube and found they had received more than 2 million page views.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Maybe it's time to take a deep breath. The recent study about an increase in the number of YouTube videos of teens and young adults who cut or injure themselves has given rise to many headlines and, thus, much worry. But the study didn't say children who watch these videos will engage in such self-destructive acts. Dr. Keith Ablow writes in "The Truth About YouTube Videos and Self-Injury" : "As a psychiatrist who has treated a few hundred patients who cut themselves or burned themselves repeatedly, however, I don’t think the YouTube videos are likely to spark any epidemic of self-injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998 | DAWN HOBBS
A Ventura County Jail inmate who slashed his throat with a disposable razor in an apparent attempted suicide was back in custody Wednesday after being treated for his injury, authorities said. Sheriff's deputies found Matthew Mattely, 39, in his cell about 7:30 p.m. Tuesday with a self-inflicted slit to his throat, authorities said. Mattely was taken by ambulance to Ventura County Medical Center and afterward released to sheriff's deputies.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2009 | Peter Wallsten
In only his second week in office, Barack Obama is punching the restart button on his presidency. On Tuesday, Day 14 of a tenure that began with high hopes and soaring promises of bringing a new competence to Washington, Obama essentially admitted that he had lost ground in confronting his biggest challenge -- fixing the country's crippled economy -- due to the "self-inflicted injury" of naming appointees who had failed to pay their taxes.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Shari Roan
They have the thinnest skin, the shortest fuses and take the hardest knocks. In psychiatrists' offices, they have long been viewed as among the most challenging patients to treat. They are the kind of people who drive a friend away for interfering and subsequently berate that friend for abandonment. But almost 20 years after the designation of borderline personality disorder as a recognized mental health condition, some understanding and hope have surfaced for people with the condition and their families.
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
YouTube videos that show teens deliberately cutting and injuring themselves are viewed by millions of online watchers -- something a new study suggests might make these disturbing acts seem mainstream and normal. The study, published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, notes that nonsuicidal self-injury -- cutting or physically hurting oneself in some way -- consistently appears in about 14% to 24% percent of children, teens and young adults. Researchers studied the top 100 videos of such acts on YouTube and found they had received more than 2 million page views.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Shari Roan
They have the thinnest skin, the shortest fuses and take the hardest knocks. In psychiatrists' offices, they have long been viewed as among the most challenging patients to treat. They are the kind of people who drive a friend away for interfering and subsequently berate that friend for abandonment. But almost 20 years after the designation of borderline personality disorder as a recognized mental health condition, some understanding and hope have surfaced for people with the condition and their families.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2009 | Peter Wallsten
In only his second week in office, Barack Obama is punching the restart button on his presidency. On Tuesday, Day 14 of a tenure that began with high hopes and soaring promises of bringing a new competence to Washington, Obama essentially admitted that he had lost ground in confronting his biggest challenge -- fixing the country's crippled economy -- due to the "self-inflicted injury" of naming appointees who had failed to pay their taxes.
HEALTH
December 8, 2008 | Shari Roan, Roan is a Times staff writer.
The revelation was shocking enough. That a growing number of teenagers and young adults deliberately embed needles, paper clips or staples in their skin may have seemed unthinkable before an Ohio radiologist presented disturbing proof at a medical meeting Wednesday. Even more disturbing than his X-rays and accompanying report, however, could be the size and pervasiveness of the trend from which it derives -- self-injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The teenager tugs at the sleeves of her oversized sweatshirt and pulls them over her hands. She wants to make certain that the scars on her arms do not show. "You don't want people to know," said 14-year-old Danielle Opremcak. "People who cut themselves feel really guilty and ashamed afterward. You're not proud of it." Danielle knows. For three years, she has repeatedly sliced her arms and legs with razor blades and pieces of glass. The ritual of self-injury began as an attempt to gain the attention of her parents, Danielle said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998 | DAWN HOBBS
A Ventura County Jail inmate who slashed his throat with a disposable razor in an apparent attempted suicide was back in custody Wednesday after being treated for his injury, authorities said. Sheriff's deputies found Matthew Mattely, 39, in his cell about 7:30 p.m. Tuesday with a self-inflicted slit to his throat, authorities said. Mattely was taken by ambulance to Ventura County Medical Center and afterward released to sheriff's deputies.
HEALTH
December 8, 2008 | Shari Roan, Roan is a Times staff writer.
The revelation was shocking enough. That a growing number of teenagers and young adults deliberately embed needles, paper clips or staples in their skin may have seemed unthinkable before an Ohio radiologist presented disturbing proof at a medical meeting Wednesday. Even more disturbing than his X-rays and accompanying report, however, could be the size and pervasiveness of the trend from which it derives -- self-injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2004 | Lynne Heffley
The Laguna Playhouse's Youth Theatre program, known for decades of well-mounted plays for young audiences based on children's literature, began expanding its reach in 2001 with a series of serious "issue" dramas for ages 13 and up. Its newest offering for this older audience, "Cut," playing March 19-21, explores a subject serious enough to warrant post-show discussions with a therapist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1987
Washington is boycotting a United Nations conference to trace the relationship, if any, between what the world spends on arms and what it needs to invest in economic development. The snub is a national disgrace that virtually guarantees that Washington's worst fears will come true. The State Department thinks the agenda of the meeting that started Monday in New York stacks the deck against the West.
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