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BUSINESS
April 21, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Business and insurance groups are attacking a proposal by state regulators to impose new limits on a controversial form of health coverage that insurers are selling to small employers. The California Department of Insurance is pushing legislation that calls for new rules on a type of company self-insurance that's growing more popular as small businesses seek alternatives to ever-rising premiums for conventional health coverage. State regulators elsewhere as well as federal officials are watching this debate in California closely because they are concerned that these policies will proliferate nationwide.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Business and insurance groups are attacking a proposal by state regulators to impose new limits on a controversial form of health coverage that insurers are selling to small employers. The California Department of Insurance is pushing legislation that calls for new rules on a type of company self-insurance that's growing more popular as small businesses seek alternatives to ever-rising premiums for conventional health coverage. State regulators elsewhere as well as federal officials are watching this debate in California closely because they are concerned that these policies will proliferate nationwide.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 1991 | From Associated Press
Frustrated with the high cost of insurance, a growing number of businesses are privately setting aside money to cover everything from cut fingers on the factory floor to dented fenders on company cars. Self-insurance, as it is known, accounts for about 22% of the $176-billion property-casualty insurance market, a fivefold increase from 1980, according to a recent study by Johnson & Higgins, an insurance consulting firm.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
Efforts to more closely regulate a controversial form of healthcare self-insurance being sold to small employers ran into business opposition in the final weeks of the Legislature's session and got shelved for now. But California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones and other backers of the crackdown on company self-insurance vow to bring back the legislation, possibly during a special session on healthcare expected in December. "We think with a little more time we will be able to educate lawmakers about the threat posed by this loophole" in the federal Affordable Care Act, Jones said.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court has ruled that employers who provide self-insured health plans for their workers have the right to substantially reduce medical benefits to those with AIDS-related illnesses. The Nov. 4 decision by the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals could hurt patients with other illnesses, lawyers involved in the issue said in interviews this week.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | JULIO MORAN, Times Staff Writer
Gardena moved closer this week to establishing its own insurance company after a consultant reported that the idea is feasible. The actual incorporation of the company is about a year away, City Manager Ken Landau said. At first the company would be able to provide only liability insurance for the city and other public agencies, but eventually the city hopes to provide insurance for homes and automobiles.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
Efforts to more closely regulate a controversial form of healthcare self-insurance being sold to small employers ran into business opposition in the final weeks of the Legislature's session and got shelved for now. But California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones and other backers of the crackdown on company self-insurance vow to bring back the legislation, possibly during a special session on healthcare expected in December. "We think with a little more time we will be able to educate lawmakers about the threat posed by this loophole" in the federal Affordable Care Act, Jones said.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accident and malpractice victims whose expenses are covered under their companies' self-insurance plans may be forced to reimburse such insurers with money won in lawsuits or settlements, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. The court decided, 7 to 1, that self-insurance plans are exempt from state laws and regulations. California and some other states have prevented insurers from attempting to recoup money paid to individuals who later win lawsuits related to their injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles city Transportation Commission on Thursday gave the embattled Valley Cab Co., now the San Fernando Valley's only taxi franchisee, until Sept. 12 to demonstrate that it has an adequate self-insurance program. The deadline was set following a series of questions from the commission staff and rival taxi firms about the credibility of a financial statement Valley Cab was required to submit to the state Department of Motor Vehicles to obtain approval of its self-insurance plan.
NEWS
July 18, 1986 | Associated Press
Responding to a liability insurance squeeze, the Senate voted 96 to 1 Thursday for legislation permitting a wide array of businesses, governments and associations to insure themselves or band together to buy group coverage. "This is a first step but only a first step in dealing with the liability insurance crisis that all of us are aware of," declared Sen. Bob Kasten (R-Wis.), chief sponsor of the legislation.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Major employers across the country, eager to curb fast-rising healthcare costs, are opening their own state-of-the-art health centers where doctors and nurses provide medical care to workers often just steps from their desks. The cost-cutting strategy has been embraced by dozens of companies — typically large employers that are self-insured and pay their own medical claims, including Walt Disney Co., Qualcomm Inc. and American Express Co. Many of the health centers are full-service medical offices equipped with exam rooms, X-ray machines and pharmacies.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2003 | Marc Levy and Robert Sandler, Associated Press
The last straw for ear, nose and throat specialist Dr. Tom Boran and his partner came when their annual malpractice insurance premiums rose this year to $92,000 from $54,000. Neither has lost a lawsuit, and though treating more patients helped them pay the cost, that left them mentally and physically exhausted at day's end, Boran said. "You get to the point where a lot of physicians say, 'Life has to be better than this,' " said Boran, who practices in Pottsville, Pa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to protect itself from potential lawsuits and other financial risks, the Los Angeles Unified School District has acquired up to $100 million in environmental insurance coverage. The 20-year policy, which will cost the district a one-time premium of $8 million, was obtained as the school board grapples with the half-finished Belmont Learning Complex downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1995 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The startling admission that UC Irvine had recently discovered 30 more instances in which human eggs or embryos were allegedly misappropriated by three fertility specialists will probably cause a flood of malpractice and fraud claims against the self-insured university, according to lawyers and legal experts. "Without a doubt, there will be a great deal of litigation over this until every stone is turned over and every question answered," said Chris Day, a Santa Ana malpractice lawyer.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Insurance specialists and company officials predict that the case of an AIDS patient who lost his company-paid health benefits will likely spur reform of the nation's 18-year-old benefits and retirement law. Reacting to a U.S. Supreme Court decision to not hear a case in which a Houston music company slashed the health coverage of John McGann, benefits experts agreed that the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act, known as ERISA, will most likely be overhauled in the near future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992
This week's Supreme Court action allowing companies that fund their own health insurance to slash the benefits paid for catastrophic diseases is but the latest scary sign of how tattered the nation's health care system has become. The decision--potentially affecting 70 million Americans covered by self-insurance health plans--should be yet another reminder, if any were needed, to the incoming Clinton Administration of the urgent need for comprehensive health care reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1986 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, Times Staff Writer
Last week, the City of Placentia received a letter from the Placentia Unified School District. The message: Stay off our property. It's not that the two public entities bearing the same name don't get along. The school district just isn't willing to take any chances by letting Placentia--which no longer has liability insurance--hold city-sponsored activities at local schools. Placentia, which was dropped by its liability carrier, Harbor Insurance Co.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1986
Chairman Christoph Tribull, a 42.5% shareholder, was among those voting for the new liability coverage; he and Sierracin are being sued for a total of $110 million by a former director and an ex-president, and the firm's current coverage will not be renewed. The action was taken at a 15-minute annual meeting at the aerospace and electronics firm's Sylmar headquarters, where many of the about 20 shareholders in attendance expressed outrage that no questions were allowed.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday gave companies that fund their own health insurance the right to sharply cut the benefits paid for AIDS and other catastrophic diseases. With only two dissenting votes, the justices refused to hear an appeal filed on behalf of an AIDS patient whose total medical benefits were slashed from $1 million to $5,000 after he revealed his illness to his supervisors. His employer, H&H Music Co.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
Recently, an employee of Aerotest Inc. was faced with an astronomical medical bill after his young son, who has Down's syndrome, was taken to the hospital with a spinal ailment. But when the $64,000 bill reached the company's claims office, Jonathan Bromberg, the head of the employee benefits office, practically flipped. "I knew that it should have been lower than that," he said.
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