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NEWS
September 10, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented move toward ending the Middle East's most enduring conflict, Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization agreed on mutual recognition Thursday, declaring their intent to begin living not as enemies but as neighbors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
The riches and fame he would earn as the greatest painter of the Dutch Golden Age were still to come. Many years ahead lay the death of his beloved wife and three of their four children, along with bankruptcy and near financial ruin. But in 1628, or thereabouts, a robust and ambitious Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn, then 21 or 22, threw back his head and laughed, then captured the moment in an oil painting on a copper plate about the size of an iPad. On Tuesday morning, concluding a brief legal standoff with Britain's cultural guardians, that lighthearted portrait of the artist landed on a wall of the East Pavilion of the Getty Museum, eliciting grins from a cluster of Getty staffers and appreciative murmurs from a handful of early visitors.
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NEWS
December 16, 1992 | JENE STONESIFER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Karolyn Wolf still is smarting from the nearly $5,000 she paid a private attorney to work out a child support and custody arrangement with the father of her son, Joseph. Pleased with the $525 monthly figure she ended up agreeing on without setting foot into a courthouse, she still wound up losing a year's worth of support payments because of the legal fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Criminal defendants who are sane enough to be tried for a crime may nevertheless be too mentally ill to act as their own lawyers, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday. In rejecting an appeal from a man denied the right to represent himself, the state high court said judges may insist that defendants be represented if they suffer from "a severe mental illness to the point where [they] cannot carry out the basic tasks" needed to mount a defense. But Justice Ming W. Chin, writing for the court, warned judges to apply the standard cautiously.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week in a dingy third-floor courtroom at the San Diego County Courthouse, accused murderer Billy Ray Waldon sat alone at a defense table, choosing the jurors who will decide whether he lives or dies. His trial had not yet begun, and already more than one prospective juror had doubts. The problem, they told the court, was not Waldon, exactly. It was the man Waldon picked as his attorney in his death penalty case: himself. "I'm biased against him," said one man.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Revolution finally came to this lush Creole fishing village one recent Sunday, drawing an expectant crowd down a gently sloping bluff to a dockside celebration with speeches and prayers. The Revolution was a dazzling sight: a 150-seat, double-decker ferry, long promised by the Sandinista government to link the backwater communities of this remote jungle region. "It was a pretty boat, so cool and clean," recalls schoolteacher Irma de Sosa. "You can dress up to ride it."
WORLD
September 21, 2005 | Henry Weinstein and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
Iraqi legislators have changed the rules for the forthcoming trial of Saddam Hussein, preventing the deposed president from representing himself, according to documents provided to the Los Angeles Times. Under the original rules for the trial, adopted in December 2003 when U.S. officials were running the country, Hussein was permitted "to defend himself in person or through legal assistance of his own choosing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2003 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles man who was sentenced to death after confessing to murder and other crimes won a rare reprieve Thursday from the California Supreme Court, which held that he was wrongly denied the right to represent himself during his trial. The state high court ruled unanimously that a Los Angeles judge erred when he summarily denied Omar Dent III's request to act as his own lawyer during his trial on charges of murder, attempted murder, robbery and kidnapping.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
If it came to that, Donald Jack Craven would swear on the Bible he'd gone straight. He was working two jobs. He had stopped dealing dope. What went down, he says, was self-defense all the way. I didn't mean to kill the guy, he says. That's why I shot him, that second time, in the legs. But the charge was homicide. So once again Craven found himself sitting at the defense table in a Los Angeles courtroom.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and ESTHER SCHRADER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Communist Party in the Soviet Baltic republic of Estonia, following the lead of neighboring Lithuania, voted Sunday to break with the Soviet Communist Party and work for the state's full independence. The Estonian Communists voted 432 to 3 to proclaim their independence from the Soviet party at a special congress in Tallinn, the republic's capital, but party officials said that more than 230 delegates, most of them Russians, did not take part in the vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2007
Days after persuading a judge to let him represent himself at trial, indicted private investigator Anthony Pellicano is again poised to use private lawyers in his defense against federal charges of racketeering and wiretapping. San Francisco attorney Steven F. Gruel said Tuesday that he and Los Angeles lawyer Michael Artan hoped to be named Pellicano's counsel. A judge granted Pellicano permission to represent himself 12 days ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
Tossing a legal hand grenade into an already-contentious case, celebrity sleuth Anthony Pellicano on Friday demanded and won the right to act as his own lawyer in his upcoming trial on wiretapping and racketeering charges. U.S. District Judge Dale S. Fischer tried to talk Pellicano out of his plan, but he would not relent. "I urge you to let me appoint counsel for you," Fischer implored in federal court in downtown Los Angeles. "You're very kind, your honor, but no, thank you," Pellicano said.
WORLD
September 21, 2005 | Henry Weinstein and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
Iraqi legislators have changed the rules for the forthcoming trial of Saddam Hussein, preventing the deposed president from representing himself, according to documents provided to the Los Angeles Times. Under the original rules for the trial, adopted in December 2003 when U.S. officials were running the country, Hussein was permitted "to defend himself in person or through legal assistance of his own choosing."
NATIONAL
October 22, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
John Allen Muhammad's request that he be allowed to serve as his own attorney was an uncommon legal move. But under the 6th Amendment, criminal defendants have the right to represent themselves -- a right solidified by a 1975 Supreme Court ruling that set a high bar for judges to turn down such requests.
WORLD
July 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Corsicans narrowly rejected a referendum to grant the island more autonomy from France -- a change the national government had hoped would quell decades of separatist violence. Successive governments have struggled to end a campaign by Corsican separatists for more autonomy from the mainland. The violence started in the 1970s and has mainly taken the form of bombings in empty buildings. The hilly Mediterranean island -- Napoleon's birthplace -- has been part of France since 1768.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2003 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles man who was sentenced to death after confessing to murder and other crimes won a rare reprieve Thursday from the California Supreme Court, which held that he was wrongly denied the right to represent himself during his trial. The state high court ruled unanimously that a Los Angeles judge erred when he summarily denied Omar Dent III's request to act as his own lawyer during his trial on charges of murder, attempted murder, robbery and kidnapping.
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
A ballot proposal to establish an autonomous Muslim region with limited self-rule in the southern Philippines appeared headed for defeat. Early results in 13 provinces and nine cities indicated a strong rejection of the referendum. Full results are not expected for several days. A low voter turnout was reported, prompting a claim of victory by the Muslim separatist Moro National Liberation Front, which had urged a boycott of the balloting.
NEWS
April 1, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity Bert Rose. He's the one with the rumpled hair and the baggy shirt, slumped in a back office with a phone in his ear. As Canada prepares for today's inauguration of its first new territory in half a century, he and his co-coordinators are the ones putting on the party: figuring out how to transport 1,200 people from all over the world into a remote quarter of the Canadian Arctic and finding a place for all of them to sleep in this frigid island village of 4,500.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge said Monday she has seen no new evidence to question the mental competency of accused Sept. 11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui, who has pledged to plead guilty this week. U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema this month reopened the issue of Moussaoui's competency to represent himself in the death penalty case. She ruled last month that he was mentally fit to be his own lawyer.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fundamental realignment of political forces is underway in Taiwan that could further complicate the island's already tense relations with mainland China, political observers here say. The surprising shift, which also carries implications for the United States, has been triggered by the grand old man of the island's successful transformation to democracy, former President Lee Teng-hui.
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