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Self Representations

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NEWS
June 9, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined that respect for human rights and the rule of law will be embedded in their political system as it develops, 14 leading Palestinian intellectuals on Wednesday announced the formation of a commission to monitor the new Palestinian Authority.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
The riches and fame he would earn as the greatest painter of the Dutch Golden Age were still to come. Many years ahead lay the death of his beloved wife and three of their four children, along with bankruptcy and near financial ruin. But in 1628, or thereabouts, a robust and ambitious Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn, then 21 or 22, threw back his head and laughed, then captured the moment in an oil painting on a copper plate about the size of an iPad. On Tuesday morning, concluding a brief legal standoff with Britain's cultural guardians, that lighthearted portrait of the artist landed on a wall of the East Pavilion of the Getty Museum, eliciting grins from a cluster of Getty staffers and appreciative murmurs from a handful of early visitors.
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NATIONAL
October 22, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
John Allen Muhammad's request that he be allowed to serve as his own attorney was an uncommon legal move. But under the 6th Amendment, criminal defendants have the right to represent themselves -- a right solidified by a 1975 Supreme Court ruling that set a high bar for judges to turn down such requests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Criminal defendants who are sane enough to be tried for a crime may nevertheless be too mentally ill to act as their own lawyers, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday. In rejecting an appeal from a man denied the right to represent himself, the state high court said judges may insist that defendants be represented if they suffer from "a severe mental illness to the point where [they] cannot carry out the basic tasks" needed to mount a defense. But Justice Ming W. Chin, writing for the court, warned judges to apply the standard cautiously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Criminal defendants who are sane enough to be tried for a crime may nevertheless be too mentally ill to act as their own lawyers, the California Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday. In rejecting an appeal from a man denied the right to represent himself, the state high court said judges may insist that defendants be represented if they suffer from "a severe mental illness to the point where [they] cannot carry out the basic tasks" needed to mount a defense. But Justice Ming W. Chin, writing for the court, warned judges to apply the standard cautiously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1999 | GERI COOK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many legal cases--divorces, wills, small claims, landlord-tenant issues and civil disputes under $20,000--often do not justify the expense or loss of control that comes with hiring an attorney. This would explain why, according to the Los Angeles Daily Journal, more than 75% of divorces and 60% of bankruptcies are done without attorney representation. With the correct forms and a small amount of legal assistance, people can often handle the case themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Friday revoked bail and refused to allow Dr. Milos Klvana, a Valencia obstetrician convicted this week of second-degree murder, to represent himself at his upcoming sentencing. Klvana had sought to act as his own attorney during his sentencing, scheduled for Jan. 12. But Judge Judith C. Chirlin refused the request. She also revoked Klvana's $750,000 bail. Klvana has been in Los Angeles County Jail since February, 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
The riches and fame he would earn as the greatest painter of the Dutch Golden Age were still to come. Many years ahead lay the death of his beloved wife and three of their four children, along with bankruptcy and near financial ruin. But in 1628, or thereabouts, a robust and ambitious Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn, then 21 or 22, threw back his head and laughed, then captured the moment in an oil painting on a copper plate about the size of an iPad. On Tuesday morning, concluding a brief legal standoff with Britain's cultural guardians, that lighthearted portrait of the artist landed on a wall of the East Pavilion of the Getty Museum, eliciting grins from a cluster of Getty staffers and appreciative murmurs from a handful of early visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ann Preston's sculptures and drawings at Rosamund Felsen Gallery push their dissection of Expressionism (in the visual arts) to such an extreme pitch that they initiate a philosophical meditation on the simplest forms of human communication. This fiendish exhibition compels viewers to entertain the idea that our most basic facial expressions are not self-evident representations of inner states but inscrutable masks that conceal far more than they reveal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Eryn Loeb
Memoir A History Ben Yagoda Riverhead: 292 pp., $25.95 In 2006, when James Frey's "A Million Little Pieces" was exposed as a fraud, the news was met with the self-righteousness and scorn typically reserved for Ponzi schemers. Ever since, Frey's name has been invoked with the arrival of every challenged memoir -- and they arrive regularly, our mounting suspicion having done little to quench our appetite for the form. As Ben Yagoda ably demonstrates in his spirited "Memoir: A History," the difficulty of defining and identifying "the truth" certainly didn't begin with Frey.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
John Allen Muhammad's request that he be allowed to serve as his own attorney was an uncommon legal move. But under the 6th Amendment, criminal defendants have the right to represent themselves -- a right solidified by a 1975 Supreme Court ruling that set a high bar for judges to turn down such requests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1999 | GERI COOK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many legal cases--divorces, wills, small claims, landlord-tenant issues and civil disputes under $20,000--often do not justify the expense or loss of control that comes with hiring an attorney. This would explain why, according to the Los Angeles Daily Journal, more than 75% of divorces and 60% of bankruptcies are done without attorney representation. With the correct forms and a small amount of legal assistance, people can often handle the case themselves.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined that respect for human rights and the rule of law will be embedded in their political system as it develops, 14 leading Palestinian intellectuals on Wednesday announced the formation of a commission to monitor the new Palestinian Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Friday revoked bail and refused to allow Dr. Milos Klvana, a Valencia obstetrician convicted this week of second-degree murder, to represent himself at his upcoming sentencing. Klvana had sought to act as his own attorney during his sentencing, scheduled for Jan. 12. But Judge Judith C. Chirlin refused the request. She also revoked Klvana's $750,000 bail. Klvana has been in Los Angeles County Jail since February, 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2004 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Imagine a world in which every historical object and event has been exhaustively studied. If you think this would put scholars out of work or force them to broaden the terrain they cover, you probably haven't crossed paths with many academics, who generally defend their shrinking areas of expertise with the ferocity of a rat in a hole. When dyed-in-the-wool professors run out of subjects to study, they study the ways in which those subjects were studied.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Every populous profession seems to be represented by a national organization that stages conventions for its members. Those who work in the visual arts are no exception, and their group--the 15,000-member, New York-based College Art Assn.--is a whopper. So are the association's annual conferences, billed as "the only national forum for the visual arts and art history."
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