Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSelling
IN THE NEWS

Selling

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | GEORGE ESPER, Associated Press
The war was still raging that day 15 years ago when Vietnamese nuns heard the cries of a baby boy stuffed in a garbage can and took him inside their orphanage to raise. Today, Nguyen Thanh Binh, the son of a black American who went home and a Vietnamese mother who abandoned him, shares the plight of thousands of Amerasian youths languishing in the decay of Vietnam, desperately trying to get out and find their fathers. "My circumstances are miserable," says Lam Anh Hong, 18, whose mother gave her away to a relative.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 1990 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a reporter for the San Diego edition of The Times.
EVERYBODY IN LA JOLLA knew the Brodericks. Daniel T. Broderick III and his wife, Betty, seemed to have a classic society-page marriage. Dan was a celebrity in local legal circles. Armed with degrees from both Harvard Law School and Cornell School of Medicine, the prominent malpractice attorney was aggressive, persuasive and cunning--a $1-million-a-year lawyer at the top of his game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
A jury Monday ordered Zsa Zsa Gabor and her husband to pay Elke Sommer $2 million for allegedly telling German publications that Sommer is a financially strapped Hollywood has-been. The Santa Monica Superior Court panel awarded Sommer $800,000 in general damages for statements attributed to Gabor and $1.2 million in general damages for statements linked to Frederick von Anhalt. The jury was scheduled to resume deliberations today to decide punitive damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2002 | TRACY WILSON and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
National Hells Angels leader George Christie Jr. was sentenced Wednesday to three years' probation for conspiring to sell drugs after a Ventura judge refused prosecutors' last-minute plea for prison time. As he left court, the 54-year-old Christie denied he had sold prescription drugs and told reporters he only pleaded guilty to spare his family prosecution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1988 | ANDREA FORD, Times Staff Writer
So you want to grouse about paying almost a quarter for a postage stamp? Consider this: Newport Beach lawyer Michael T. Walsh paid $75,000 for one Thursday. And the picture on it isn't even right side up. The stamp was issued by the Iranian government in 1950 and still is glued to an envelope. It is, according to a stamp broker, the most expensive Iranian stamp ever sold, and it is thought to be one of only two of its kind still in existence.
TRAVEL
July 19, 1992 | GEOFFREY O'GARA, O'Gara is a free-lance writer based in Lander, Wyo., and a contributing editor to National Geographic Traveler magazine.
We live in a contradictory age, when city slickers pay a fortune to become weekend buckaroos herding cattle in the Wyoming outback, yet disdain red meat at the dinner table in favor of some pale bottom-trash fish with a sprig of parsley in its mouth. I'm sorry, Hopalong, but this won't do. If you seek the authentic western experience you had better be prepared to sink your canines into a serious chunk of bovine.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
An exhibit booth--just the booth, not the people--was once taken hostage by a New York trucking company in a dispute with an air freight firm over an unpaid bill. The kidnaping stunt worked. The panicked company that owned the booth scurried to scrape together something--anything--else for the trade show that was about to open in Washington. Meanwhile, it pleaded for a settlement and, barely in time, the deal was made and the booth set free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | JEAN GUCCIONE and SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's been almost a year, but Benjamin Markowitz still has trouble believing his childhood friends could have kidnapped and killed his younger brother. "In my worst nightmares, I never would have thought that that would have happened," Markowitz, 23, said last week in an interview. It was a brazen crime that stunned the West Valley, where most of the young suspects had grown up. They'd played baseball together on the well-groomed fields of a private league.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The call came on the eve of his Los Angeles concert, just as he was leaving his home in Mexico. We have your son. Follow our instructions. Don't make trouble. It was a year ago, and Vicente Fernandez was about to headline four sold-out shows at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, his annual Memorial Day pilgrimage to the Eastside suburbs of L.A. Now this voice, saying his 33-year-old son, his namesake, was being held for a ransom of millions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|