Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSelling
IN THE NEWS

Selling

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1998 | ALLISON COHEN
The Los Angeles city attorney's office filed a criminal complaint Monday against a Tarzana man accused of selling illegal cable converter boxes on the Internet. Peter Mulder Johnston, 43, could face a maximum sentence of one year in jail and a $250,000 fine if convicted. Arraignment is scheduled for March 11. The city attorney's office alleges Johnston offered the "black boxes" on the World Wide Web, using the name "The Original Cable Guy."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 3, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to speed sales of its already fast-moving condominiums and increase demand for its rental units, Irvine Co. is offering residents of its apartments as much as $3,000 credit if they purchase one of the company's condos. Details of the plan were mailed late last month to residents of the giant land developer's 11,000 apartments in Irvine, Newport Beach and Tustin. Though this is the first time that the Irvine Co.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trustee running bankrupt Newport Beach home builder Baldwin Co. has sued the firm's owners, brothers Alfred and James Baldwin, claiming they want to resurrect their development empire by wresting the rights to thousands of acres of valuable land from the business that bears their name. Bankruptcy trustee David Gould argues that the brothers are jeopardizing his efforts to nurse Baldwin Co. through a reorganization and repay more than $250 million in debts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2001 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Greenwood, known to Southern Californians as "the Bedspread King," has died. He was 93. Greenwood, a longtime Long Beach resident, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday night at his daughter's and son-in-law's home in Seal Beach. A Massachusetts native who made his way west during the Great Depression, Greenwood became known in his later years for his kitschy late-night TV advertisements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1989 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
As a beloved ex-President, Ronald Reagan almost always gets what he wants these days. But this week, one of Reagan's personal wishes was blocked by a federal convict with a typewriter. Last Friday, Reagan personally telephoned the National Park Service in Washington to add his support to proposed national historic landmark status for a mitten-shaped hill in the Santa Monica Mountains that includes prized Chumash Indian cave paintings. But on Monday, when the Park Service's advisory board met, it concluded that its hands were tied.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1987 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Orange County will soon join Dallas in the limelight of a television series. The success of the new series, however, will not be measured in Nielsen ratings but in the yen it can attract; the show is targeted for Japanese businessmen. The three-hour, three-part series portraying Orange County's business and investment potential is scheduled to air early this summer in Los Angeles on Channel 18's Japan News Magazine and later on two major networks in Japan.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2008 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
Is Mercury headed for the junkyard? Speculation is mounting that Ford Motor Co., preoccupied with reviving its Ford and Lincoln brands, might decide to retire the Mercury nameplate rather than spend scarce resources trying to restore its former luster. Despite denials from Ford, the conjecture got a boost last week when Jerome York, a former auto executive and advisor to billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian, said shedding the brand would be a smart move for the struggling automaker.
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | LARRY HARNISCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Light does not easily penetrate the clouded story of Betty Short, a 22-year-old unemployed cashier and waitress whose body was found cut in half and gruesomely mutilated 50 years ago this month in a vacant lot in Southwest Los Angeles. The unsolved killing remains Los Angeles' premier myth noir, a tale of a tragic beauty clad in black, prowling the night life, a cautionary fable that rings as true today as it did in 1947. The legend insists on a shadowed, epic tone.
REAL ESTATE
December 12, 2004 | Ruth Ryon, Special to The Times
Actor Noah Wyle has sold his Los Feliz home for close to its $3.8-million asking price. The buyer was Robert Richardson, who won an Oscar in 1991 for best cinematography for "JFK." The house, which actor Tim Curry also once owned, is a restored Spanish colonial estate. It is on about 1.5 acres of lush grounds and has three bedrooms and 3 1/2 bathrooms in slightly more than 4,000 square feet. The home has hand-carved, hand-stenciled ceilings, a pool, an amphitheater, waterfalls and fountains.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of Orange County's pioneer developers of planned communities, the Mission Viejo Co., will be sold to J.F. Shea Co., an expanding Southern California building firm, it was announced Friday. The deal is expected to fetch more than $400 million, although terms were not disclosed by Philip Morris Cos. Inc., which has owned the Mission Viejo Co. since 1972. Shea will acquire about 900 acres of undeveloped land in Mission Viejo and Aliso Viejo, and 3,600 acres in Colorado.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|