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NEWS
March 12, 1990 | Associated Press
Activists protesting the ouster of Selma's first black school superintendent camped out Sunday at City Hall despite a court order barring them from the building outside business hours. "We're waiting to notify the judge that they're violating the order," Mayor Joe Smitherman said.
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NEWS
May 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An all-white Selma Board of Education named James Carter, a black man, interim superintendent of schools. Carter was executive assistant to Norward Roussell, Selma's first black superintendent, and had been filling in since Roussell's failure to win contract renewal in December prompted strikes and demonstrations. The six board members agreed to give Carter the interim vacancy while they seek a replacement for Roussell, who resigned last week with a $150,000 settlement from the city.
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NEWS
January 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Civil rights activists in Selma, Ala., suspended a classroom boycott by black students until Jan. 16, after final exams, and announced plans to sue the majority white board that ousted the city's first black school superintendent. One picket was arrested on the second day of the boycott, and the absentee rate dropped from 25% to 15%. Protest leader Hank Sanders said he would file suit challenging the act creating Selma's school board. Supt.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | Associated Press
Activists protesting the ouster of Selma's first black school superintendent camped out Sunday at City Hall despite a court order barring them from the building outside business hours. "We're waiting to notify the judge that they're violating the order," Mayor Joe Smitherman said.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Any court order to end sit-ins at the Selma, Ala., high school and City Hall would escalate racial tension, an attorney for the protesters said. A judge scheduled a conference for today on a request from city attorneys for a temporary restraining order halting the protests, which have kept all Selma schools closed since last Wednesday. "It probably would escalate it," attorney J. L. Chestnut said of a court order. "I don't think black people give a damn about an injunction."
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Schools closed for a week by a racial protest were reopened Tuesday amid heavy security, including 200 National Guardsmen who were sent by Gov. Guy Hunt. Absenteeism was high, but officials reported no problems in the classrooms. About 150 black student protesters boycotted Selma High School and marched around a flagpole chanting: "Shut 'em down; no school," before the opening bell. Two dozen other protesters continued a sit-in at City Hall for a seventh day.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An all-white Selma Board of Education named James Carter, a black man, interim superintendent of schools. Carter was executive assistant to Norward Roussell, Selma's first black superintendent, and had been filling in since Roussell's failure to win contract renewal in December prompted strikes and demonstrations. The six board members agreed to give Carter the interim vacancy while they seek a replacement for Roussell, who resigned last week with a $150,000 settlement from the city.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
About 150 black students abandoned their sit-in at Selma High School on Monday at the request of black school Supt. Norward Roussell, whose firing by the white-controlled school board sparked the demonstration. But the students, whose sit-in had closed public schools in the 70% black, 6,000-student system since Thursday, took their protest to City Hall with a call for Mayor Joe Smitherman's resignation.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Schools closed for a week by a racial protest were reopened Tuesday amid heavy security, including 200 National Guardsmen who were sent by Gov. Guy Hunt. Absenteeism was high, but officials reported no problems in the classrooms. About 150 black student protesters boycotted Selma High School and marched around a flagpole chanting: "Shut 'em down; no school," before the opening bell. Two dozen other protesters continued a sit-in at City Hall for a seventh day.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
About 150 black students abandoned their sit-in at Selma High School on Monday at the request of black school Supt. Norward Roussell, whose firing by the white-controlled school board sparked the demonstration. But the students, whose sit-in had closed public schools in the 70% black, 6,000-student system since Thursday, took their protest to City Hall with a call for Mayor Joe Smitherman's resignation.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Any court order to end sit-ins at the Selma, Ala., high school and City Hall would escalate racial tension, an attorney for the protesters said. A judge scheduled a conference for today on a request from city attorneys for a temporary restraining order halting the protests, which have kept all Selma schools closed since last Wednesday. "It probably would escalate it," attorney J. L. Chestnut said of a court order. "I don't think black people give a damn about an injunction."
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Civil rights activists in Selma, Ala., suspended a classroom boycott by black students until Jan. 16, after final exams, and announced plans to sue the majority white board that ousted the city's first black school superintendent. One picket was arrested on the second day of the boycott, and the absentee rate dropped from 25% to 15%. Protest leader Hank Sanders said he would file suit challenging the act creating Selma's school board. Supt.
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