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Selwa Lucky Roosevelt

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June 19, 1988 | MARJORIE WILLIAMS, The Washington Post
The U.S. chief of protocol begins by threatening to cry. The interview has been arranged for a dual profile of Ambassador Selwa (Lucky) Roosevelt and her husband, Archie, a retired CIA officer who has just published his memoirs. Most of it will take place at the couple's house in Georgetown, but the reporter has asked first to meet Mrs. Roosevelt at her office in Foggy Bottom. To catch her, as it were, in her habitat.
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NEWS
June 19, 1988 | MARJORIE WILLIAMS, The Washington Post
The U.S. chief of protocol begins by threatening to cry. The interview has been arranged for a dual profile of Ambassador Selwa (Lucky) Roosevelt and her husband, Archie, a retired CIA officer who has just published his memoirs. Most of it will take place at the couple's house in Georgetown, but the reporter has asked first to meet Mrs. Roosevelt at her office in Foggy Bottom. To catch her, as it were, in her habitat.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pamela Gardner Ahearn, 52, who served nine years as chief of protocol at the U.S. House of Representatives after earlier experience with the State Department's office of protocol and as Elizabeth Taylor's executive assistant, died March 26 of a heart attack at her home in Alexandria, Va. After holding high-level protocol positions in the Reagan administration and with the U.S. Information Agency, Ahearn was named chief of protocol by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) in 1995.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Mary Lou Loper's column is published Sundays
It was to be an elegant six-course dinner--five glasses, four forks, four knives for the Colorado Mountain smoked trout with cheese pastry bow-ties, the velvety sorrel soup, the California pink grapefruit sorbet, the stuffed veal with saffron rice pilaf and artichoke nicoise, then the garden greens before the orange mousse with the chocolate presidential seal.
NEWS
December 25, 1998 | ELLEN GAMERMAN, BALTIMORE SUN
Sandra Matisone feels every inch at home in the fusty elegance of the Washington Club, amid a sea of little black dresses and business suits. But at this diplomatic soiree, standing by the buffet of baby chops and lingonberry sauce, she stands out just a bit. After all, Matisone is swathed head to toe in thousand-year-old Latvian style (discreetly excluding the pagan fertility symbols her countrywomen once considered de rigueur).
NEWS
June 1, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Hidden away on a side street, overshadowed by the onion-domed churches and sterile skyscrapers nearby, is a yellow mansion known as Spaso House, which for 55 years has been an American oasis in the middle of Moscow. Yet it's hard to imagine a time when this U.S. ambassador's residence resonated with more lightheartedness and laughter than during President and Nancy Reagan's summit dinner for the Gorbachevs Tuesday night. "The atmosphere is terrific," exulted Selwa (Lucky) Roosevelt, the U.S.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2004 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Ronald Reagan will return to Washington for the last time today, surrounded by the inner circle of advisors who helped propel him from the back lots of Hollywood to the world stage of the presidency. When former First Lady Nancy Reagan descends the steps of a plane carrying Reagan's casket from California, she will be accompanied by Charles Z.
NEWS
July 21, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
It's an absolute first for Los Angeles. And it should thrill everyone whose heart beats faster at the sight of a new fashion creation. And particularly when that fashion comes from Paris, the fashion capital of the world, and it carries that incomparable label--Chanel. What we're leading up to is the premier showing in Los Angeles of the fall couture collection (it makes its debut next week in Paris) from the House of Chanel.
NEWS
February 17, 1986 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
After 24 years of catering to the whims of the overweight rich, Deborah Szekely wanted something more. Sure, she founded the Golden Door, the opulent, Japanese-style spa in Escondido where women plunk down $3,000 a week to have their bodies massaged, thinned and fussed over. Yes, Szekely was on so many boards, volunteered for so many civic projects and won so many citizen awards that you need two weeks of workouts at the Door before you can lift her bio sheet.
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