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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2009 | Claudia Luther
Jennifer Jones, the actress who won an Academy Award for her luminous performance in the 1943 film "The Song of Bernadette" and who was married to two legendary men -- producer David O. Selznick and industrialist and art collector Norton Simon -- has died. She was 90. Jones died Thursday of natural causes at her home in Malibu, according to Leslie C. Denk, a spokeswoman for the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena. Jones had an influential role at the art museum, becoming chairwoman of the Norton Simon Foundation Board after her husband's death in 1993 and overseeing a $3-million renovation of the museum's interior and gardens that was completed in 1999.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery
Albie Selznick's career has been a long, tiring and, at times depressing trip through comedy, music and acting. But Selznick hopes his story - or at least the version of it he performs each weekend - is a hero's journey. The 54-year-old actor-magician takes the small, intimate stage at the Road Theatre Co. in North Hollywood each weekend to perform a show that draws heavily from this childhood struggles to cope with his father's death by using magic. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures "When I was a kid my friends used to ask me why I wanted to be a magician," Selznick says at the beginning of his show, "Smoke and Mirrors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009 | David C. Nichols
"It's only in the movies where the dead can walk," David O. Selznick tells Ben Hecht at the climax of "Moonlight and Magnolias," in its Orange County premiere at the Laguna Playhouse. He adds, "You have any other way to live forever?" So goes the ostensible point of author Ron Hutchinson's frenetic, fact-based comedy about legendary producer Selznick's obsessive drive to film "Gone With the Wind." At base, "Moonlight" wants to resurrect the ethos of Hecht and Charles MacArthur's "The Front Page," via a slender conceit that relies heavily on our familiarity with the iconic movie based on Margaret Mitchell's 1937 Pulitzer-winning novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2012 | By Baxter Holmes, Los Angeles Times
Gene Selznick, a beach volleyball player who pioneered the sport in Southern California and twice coached U.S. teams in the Olympics, died Sunday at Kindred Hospital in Los Angeles. He was 82. His family said he had multiple health issues, including pneumonia. Selznick had been involved in volleyball - playing indoors and on the beach - from his teens until he was 81, when his health failed him to the point where he could no longer coach club teams. "It is hard to imagine anyone who will by the level of their skill and personality have a greater influence on the sport he loved so much," USA Volleyball Chief Executive Doug Beal said in a statement . "Gene's accomplishments are legendary, and he was truly someone who became larger than life.
BOOKS
November 15, 1992
As publicist on the film "A Farewell to Arms" (Italy, '57), I was the recipient of innumerable David O. Selznick memos ("Showman," Oct. 25). Once, I dared to respond by memo. Back came the inevitable memorandum: "I don't have time to read memos. Please see me in my office or on the set about this matter." AL HIX, HOLLYWOOD
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997
In his informative piece on David Puttnam ("Learning as He Goes," Aug. 10), David Gritten stated that the film producer was "the first European-born boss of a Hollywood studio." Gritten must have forgotten Laemmle, Germany; Mayer and Selznick, Russia; Zukor and Fox, Hungary; and Goldwyn, Poland, just to name a few. If he meant British, one must not forget Charles Chaplin. ARNOLD SCHWARTZMAN Los Angeles
NEWS
May 17, 1997
Mary Boyle Seitz, 93, scenarist for the 1930 motion picture that afforded John Wayne his initial break. She outlined the characters, plot and scenes for "The Big Trail," which gave Wayne his first leading role. A native of Canada, Seitz joined MGM Studios on its opening day in 1924. She worked for such luminaries as Irving Thalberg, David O. Selznick and Raoul Walsh over the next decade. She left the film business in 1934 to marry John F.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Jennifer Jones became one of the top stars of the 1940s and '50s under the guidance of her second husband, uber-producer David O. Selznick. Because of Selznick's firm grip, though, Jones didn't make as many movies as some of her contemporaries, such as Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. As a result, many people today aren't familiar with her work, save perhaps for her final role as Fred Astaire's love interest in 1974's "The Towering Inferno. " But during her career, Jones earned a lead actress Oscar for 1943's "The Song of Bernadette" and received nominations for 1944's "Since You Went Away," 1945's "Love Letters," 1946's "Duel in the Sun" and 1955's "Love Is a Many Splendored-Thing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Fred Crane, a former longtime Los Angeles classical music radio announcer who achieved a slice of film immortality when he played one of the handsome Tarleton twins in the 1939 movie classic "Gone With the Wind," has died. He was 90. Crane, who had been hospitalized for a few weeks with complications related to diabetes, died of a blood clot in his lung Thursday in a hospital near Atlanta, said his wife, Terry. Crane was said to be the oldest surviving adult male cast member of "Gone With the Wind," producer David O. Selznick's epic production of the Margaret Mitchell novel starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh.
NEWS
May 15, 1997
L. Jeffrey Selznick, 64, son of the legendary Daniel O. Selznick and himself a producer. The younger Selznick and his brother, Daniel, were co-executive producers of the Peabody Award-winning documentary "The Making of a Legend: 'Gone With The Wind.' " The documentary inaugurated Turner Network Television and marked the 50th anniversary of the landmark film produced by the Selznicks' late father.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
So here's Brian Selznick, on a Friday afternoon in Culver City, standing in the vestibule of the Museum of Jurassic Technology, a grin of anticipation on his face. It was, after all, this storefront museum - "the museum as performance art," Selznick calls it - that inspired "Wonderstruck," his most recent novel for middle readers, which takes place, in part, at New York's Museum of Natural History and plays with the idea of the museum as what was once known as a wonder cabinet: a collection meant "to fill you, literally, with wonder, in the old-fashioned sense of amazement and awe. " That's the ethos of the Museum of Jurassic Technology, which walks a line between fact and fiction, displaying both invented and authentic artifacts, challenging our sense of believability, asking how far we are willing to go. "What's thrilling," Selznick says, as he begins to walk through the museum, stopping at exhibit after exhibit, "is that what's true and what isn't true, it's all the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
This year, the Producers Guild of America could just rename its annual award show after Scott Rudin. For Rudin's two nominations Tuesday morning, for "The Social Network" and "True Grit," landed the producer in the record books for being the first person nominated by the guild twice in one year. Not only that, his achievement also coincides with the guild's previously planned presentation to Rudin of the esteemed David O. Selznick award. "I find the whole thing rather humbling," said an obviously delighted Rudin, who did have two pictures in the running in 2008, with "No Country for Old Men" and " There Will Be Blood," but since he was an executive producer on "Blood," he was not given the same level of credit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Jennifer Jones became one of the top stars of the 1940s and '50s under the guidance of her second husband, uber-producer David O. Selznick. Because of Selznick's firm grip, though, Jones didn't make as many movies as some of her contemporaries, such as Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. As a result, many people today aren't familiar with her work, save perhaps for her final role as Fred Astaire's love interest in 1974's "The Towering Inferno. " But during her career, Jones earned a lead actress Oscar for 1943's "The Song of Bernadette" and received nominations for 1944's "Since You Went Away," 1945's "Love Letters," 1946's "Duel in the Sun" and 1955's "Love Is a Many Splendored-Thing.
HOME & GARDEN
October 2, 2010 | By Sam Watters, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There are two great tea parties: the Boston tax revolt in 1773 and the homey tea time enjoyed since the Pilgrims landed in 1620. Here's a story about the Plymouth Rock variety. The year was 1946 and movie babe Jennifer Jones was 27. She'd rocketed to fame playing the ingénue daughter of compassionate Claudette Colbert in David Selznick's blockbuster "Since You Went Away. " She'd won an Oscar for her pious saint in "The Song of Bernadette," and notoriety was on the way for her turn as a sex goddess in the just-released "Duel in the Sun. " Branded by critics as "Lust in the Sun," that film ?
HOME & GARDEN
March 9, 2010 | Lauren Beale
A Beverly Hills house with a decades-long string of celebrity owners has come on the market at $15.9 million. Designed by Roland Coate and built in 1934 for producer David O. Selznick, who won a best picture Oscar for "Gone With the Wind," the traditional house has a two-story entry, a formal living room, a walk-in bar in the family room, library and dining room fireplaces, a billiards room, an office and two maids' quarters. The dining room features original Greek keystone-shaped marble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2009 | Claudia Luther
Jennifer Jones, the actress who won an Academy Award for her luminous performance in the 1943 film "The Song of Bernadette" and who was married to two legendary men -- producer David O. Selznick and industrialist and art collector Norton Simon -- has died. She was 90. Jones died Thursday of natural causes at her home in Malibu, according to Leslie C. Denk, a spokeswoman for the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena. Jones had an influential role at the art museum, becoming chairwoman of the Norton Simon Foundation Board after her husband's death in 1993 and overseeing a $3-million renovation of the museum's interior and gardens that was completed in 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1988 | TAMMY SIMS
David O. Selznick, the legendary producer of "Gone With the Wind," was, in the words of his sons Jeffrey and Daniel Selznick, a cheerful, charming, arrogant madman who was passionate about making movies and throwing a good party. To Hollywood film makers, Selznick was a compulsive gambler who loved to play high stakes when it came to making movies. His employees called him a terribly disorganized "man of memos," and the public called him crazy to spend $3 million on one film.
REAL ESTATE
April 20, 1986 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Carson's sidekick Ed McMahon and McMahon's wife, Victoria, have bought the old David O. Selznick estate in Beverly Hills. That, according to Joyce Flaherty of Schreiber Realty, who represented the McMahons in the purchase. Paris Moskopoulos of Paris Realty was listing broker. Selznick, who died in 1965, lived there, Flaherty said, with his wife, Irene, during filming of "Gone With the Wind," which he produced in 1939.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009 | David C. Nichols
"It's only in the movies where the dead can walk," David O. Selznick tells Ben Hecht at the climax of "Moonlight and Magnolias," in its Orange County premiere at the Laguna Playhouse. He adds, "You have any other way to live forever?" So goes the ostensible point of author Ron Hutchinson's frenetic, fact-based comedy about legendary producer Selznick's obsessive drive to film "Gone With the Wind." At base, "Moonlight" wants to resurrect the ethos of Hecht and Charles MacArthur's "The Front Page," via a slender conceit that relies heavily on our familiarity with the iconic movie based on Margaret Mitchell's 1937 Pulitzer-winning novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Fred Crane, a former longtime Los Angeles classical music radio announcer who achieved a slice of film immortality when he played one of the handsome Tarleton twins in the 1939 movie classic "Gone With the Wind," has died. He was 90. Crane, who had been hospitalized for a few weeks with complications related to diabetes, died of a blood clot in his lung Thursday in a hospital near Atlanta, said his wife, Terry. Crane was said to be the oldest surviving adult male cast member of "Gone With the Wind," producer David O. Selznick's epic production of the Margaret Mitchell novel starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh.
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