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BUSINESS
May 10, 1989 | From The Washington Post
Sematech, a government-funded consortium formed to enhance the U.S. semiconductor industry, has been successful so far but should not necessarily be used as a role model for other industries, according to a new government study. The report, prepared by the Commerce Department and issued by the Pentagon, generally praises the work of the 2-year-old consortium, whose members are charged with the task of developing technologies needed to produce sophisticated semiconductors. The Bush Administration has recommended continuing Sematech's $100-million annual government funding next year, an amount matched by the 14 member companies.
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BUSINESS
July 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Computer consortium Sematech has indicated that it will propose phasing out its $90 million in annual federal funding and scaling back its operations as early as two years from now. After a board meeting Friday in which directors voted to "propose a new model of industry-government cooperation," the 7-year-old chip manufacturing research consortium said in a statement that it has succeeded in advancing the United States' chip-making know-how.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. semiconductor industry's chief trade group said Wednesday that it has approved a plan to raise $1.5 billion over six years to fund a proposed chip manufacturing-technology consortium aimed at maintaining U.S. competitiveness in the industry. The Semiconductor Industry Assn. said it will begin efforts immediately to raise $250 million per year--half from the industry and half from the government--to fund the consortium, dubbed Sematech.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1993
Plasma & Materials Technologies Inc., a Chatsworth maker of plasma equipment and plasma-controlled instruments for the semiconductor industry, has been awarded a contract by Sematech, a high-profile, government-aided consortium of computer chip manufacturers. The dollar value of the contract was not disclosed. PMT will help provide Sematech with a new technique for making semiconductors, called the Advanced Polysilicon Etch Project. Based in Austin, Tex.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian, apparently determined to avoid the wrangling in the Capitol that almost prevented the state from bidding on a $4.4-billion federal atom-smasher project, bypassed the Legislature on Friday in submitting a reported $125-million bid to bring a high-technology research project to the Silicon Valley.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian declared Thursday that he accepts full blame for California's loss of a $4.4-billion federal atom smasher project, saying, "If it makes some people happy to blame the governor, I'll take the responsibility." But Deukmejian insisted that the loss of that project and others in recent months does not mean that California is losing its high technology advantage to competing states.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1989 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
To members of Congress who are seeking to protect American manufacturers from what they regard as unfair competition from abroad, the massive trade law they enacted last year stands as a monument of hard-nosed realism. But to a wide range of U.S. businesses that stand to suffer from its implementation, the act is only another sorry example of the law of unintended consequences. A case in point: the heightened threat of 100% tariffs against an array of 54 Japanese imports in retaliation for Japan's failure to open its market in mobile radio and cellular telephone services and equipment to U.S. manufacturers.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1991
Robert W. Galvin, chairman of the executive committee of Motorola, has been elected chairman of Sematech, the Austin, Tex., industry-government research consortium devoted to advanced semiconductor manufacturing. Galvin replaces Charles Sporck, who led the drive to create Sematech. Sporck earlier this month announced his retirement as president and chief executive of National Semiconductor. It was not announced at that time that Sporck was also relinquishing his role at Sematech.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William J. Spencer, a Xerox Corp. veteran appointed Wednesday as chief executive of Sematech, faces a daunting task in moving the semiconductor research consortium toward the ambitious--and some say impossible--goal of restoring American leadership in chip production technology.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Twelve states were named finalists Thursday in the hotly contested bidding for a semiconductor manufacturing research operation with an annual budget of $250 million, to be funded by private industry and government. Sematech, which had been considering 34 states as its future home, narrowed the field to Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas and Wisconsin. The states have until Dec.
OPINION
January 31, 1993
Don't look now, but the idea of public-private partnerships, until recently derogated as a corruption of honest market capitalism, may soon be in vogue, thanks to Sematech--and, in fact, market economics. Everyone knows that when it comes to developing cutting-edge high technology, new research efforts involve tremendous start-up costs. That fact alone might make partnerships between government and industry an increasingly attractive idea; the Sematech success nails down the point.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sematech, the government-backed computer chip consortium, said Thursday that it had reached an important technical milestone in its effort to restore U.S. competitiveness in chip manufacturing. The announcement is the latest indication that improved management at U.S. firms, a major recession in the Japanese market and government policies have enabled the American chip industry to begin turning the tide in its long battle with the Japanese.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sematech chip research consortium suffered a significant setback Monday when one of its founding members, LSI Logic of Milpitas, became the first to withdraw from the 5-year-old organization. Sematech, a novel government-industry venture that receives about $100 million a year in taxpayer funds, is lobbying for another five years of government support.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1991
Robert W. Galvin, chairman of the executive committee of Motorola, has been elected chairman of Sematech, the Austin, Tex., industry-government research consortium devoted to advanced semiconductor manufacturing. Galvin replaces Charles Sporck, who led the drive to create Sematech. Sporck earlier this month announced his retirement as president and chief executive of National Semiconductor. It was not announced at that time that Sporck was also relinquishing his role at Sematech.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William J. Spencer, a Xerox Corp. veteran appointed Wednesday as chief executive of Sematech, faces a daunting task in moving the semiconductor research consortium toward the ambitious--and some say impossible--goal of restoring American leadership in chip production technology.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The semiconductor research consortium Sematech has named a top Xerox Corp. executive as its president and chief executive, officials announced today. William J. Spencer, 60, a veteran microelectronics researcher, will succeed Robert Noyce at Sematech's helm. Noyce died of a heart attack this summer. Spencer is the former group vice president and senior technical officer for Xerox Corp. in Stamford, Conn. He also previously managed Xerox's worldwide research activity.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER
A founding father and patriarch of Silicon Valley has been named chief executive of Sematech, a giant research consortium aimed at ensuring U.S. leadership in semiconductor manufacturing. Robert N. Noyce, vice chairman and co-founder of Intel Corp., will direct the consortium's 135-member staff, which is expected to expand to 800 people over the next several years. Austin, Tex.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1993
Plasma & Materials Technologies Inc., a Chatsworth maker of plasma equipment and plasma-controlled instruments for the semiconductor industry, has been awarded a contract by Sematech, a high-profile, government-aided consortium of computer chip manufacturers. The dollar value of the contract was not disclosed. PMT will help provide Sematech with a new technique for making semiconductors, called the Advanced Polysilicon Etch Project. Based in Austin, Tex.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the beginning, life has been difficult for Sematech. For starters, the charter of the ambitious 3-year-old government-and-industry consortium--to breathe new life into the domestic chip business by developing and dispersing state-of-the-art technology--is enormous.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1990 | From United Press International
Calling it a "tremendous blow" to U.S. competitiveness, high-technology research consortium Sematech has launched a campaign to block the sale of a small semiconductor equipment company to a Japanese firm. Sematech officials said they would ask federal regulators to reject the sale of Semi-Gas Systems Inc. of San Jose to Nippon-Sanso of Tokyo. The deal must face U.S. government approval on antitrust and national security grounds.
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