Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSematech Consortium
IN THE NEWS

Sematech Consortium

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 22, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sematech, the government-backed computer chip consortium, said Thursday that it had reached an important technical milestone in its effort to restore U.S. competitiveness in chip manufacturing. The announcement is the latest indication that improved management at U.S. firms, a major recession in the Japanese market and government policies have enabled the American chip industry to begin turning the tide in its long battle with the Japanese.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sematech to Forgo Government Funding: The 7-year-old computer chip research consortium is expected to formally announce today that it will give up the $90 million a year it now gets from the Defense Department by late 1996. The consortium will continue its work using corporate funds, which currently account for half the consortium's budget. Sematech and its backers--most of the major U.S. chip makers--indicated earlier this year that they will soon give up government funding.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
AT&T signed an agreement Monday to share a key ingredient used to make advanced semiconductors under the auspices of Sematech, the consortium of computer chip makers formed to boost U.S. semiconductor competitiveness. Under the agreement, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. will allow a division of Olin Corp. to make and sell a chemical used to etch extremely detailed electronic circuitry on chips.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Computer consortium Sematech has indicated that it will propose phasing out its $90 million in annual federal funding and scaling back its operations as early as two years from now. After a board meeting Friday in which directors voted to "propose a new model of industry-government cooperation," the 7-year-old chip manufacturing research consortium said in a statement that it has succeeded in advancing the United States' chip-making know-how.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1988 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
California's failure to capture Sematech, the much sought-after $1.5-billion semiconductor consortium, left state officials and politicians puzzled Wednesday and worrying about the blow to the state's chip industry. Sematech officially confirmed that Austin, Tex., had bested San Jose and sites in 10 other states for Sematech's principal manufacturing and development center, partly because the Texas capital had a facility that could be ready immediately.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Defense Department plans to cut its funding of Sematech, a consortium founded in 1987 to boost the U.S. semiconductor industry's competitiveness. The General Accounting Office said Monday that the Pentagon will scale back its research budget on chip manufacturing to $80 million and that not all of that will go to Sematech in future years. The Defense Department agency has spent $100 million during each of Sematech's first five years.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The Defense Department on Thursday signed an agreement releasing $100 million in federal funding to Sematech, the consortium of 14 U.S. semiconductor companies, for use at its new Texas research center in an effort to overtake Japan's leadership in the industry. Under the agreement, which Sematech Chairman S. L.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a press conference last week, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) and the chip research consortium Sematech went public with an accusation that many in the computer chip business have long advanced in private: Japanese vendors of chip-making gear are withholding their best technology from American companies--and sometimes delivering it late and at a premium price when they do make it available. These are serious charges.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months ago, the government-backed Sematech chip-research consortium celebrated a milestone: it had produced leading-edge computer chips using only American-made equipment. Now that achievement is in danger of being overshadowed by an embarrassing failure, one that would present the Clinton Administration with an early and unwelcome lesson in the hazards of an activist high-tech policy.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The White House's science adviser Wednesday denied reports that the Bush Administration may seek to slash federal support for Sematech, an industry-government consortium working to develop advanced computer chips. "I personally am completely unaware of any move to reduce support for Sematech," D. Allan Bromley told the Senate Armed Services defense industry and technology subcommittee.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months ago, the government-backed Sematech chip-research consortium celebrated a milestone: it had produced leading-edge computer chips using only American-made equipment. Now that achievement is in danger of being overshadowed by an embarrassing failure, one that would present the Clinton Administration with an early and unwelcome lesson in the hazards of an activist high-tech policy.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sematech, the government-backed computer chip consortium, said Thursday that it had reached an important technical milestone in its effort to restore U.S. competitiveness in chip manufacturing. The announcement is the latest indication that improved management at U.S. firms, a major recession in the Japanese market and government policies have enabled the American chip industry to begin turning the tide in its long battle with the Japanese.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Defense Department plans to cut its funding of Sematech, a consortium founded in 1987 to boost the U.S. semiconductor industry's competitiveness. The General Accounting Office said Monday that the Pentagon will scale back its research budget on chip manufacturing to $80 million and that not all of that will go to Sematech in future years. The Defense Department agency has spent $100 million during each of Sematech's first five years.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1992
This letter is written as a disclaimer to the recent article (Times, March 20) entitled "Challengers Hope to Have Field Day Against Sidetracked Incumbents." Pete Fajardo, a candidate for the city of Carson election on April 14, has inferred that I am one of several government officials who have endorsed his candidacy for City Council. At this time, I'd like to make it perfectly clear that I have not officially endorsed Mr.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sematech chip research consortium suffered a significant setback Monday when one of its founding members, LSI Logic of Milpitas, became the first to withdraw from the 5-year-old organization. Sematech, a novel government-industry venture that receives about $100 million a year in taxpayer funds, is lobbying for another five years of government support.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sematech Issues Optimistic Report: Seeking to build support for continued government funding, the Sematech computer chip research consortium released a glowing assessment of its accomplishments to date and sketched out how it would spend a proposed $1 billion over the next five years.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1988 | PENELOPE Mc MILLAN, Times Staff Writer
In another setback to California's efforts to lure important new research facilities, the consortium Sematech reportedly has chosen Austin, Tex., for the site of its principal manufacturing and development center. The consortium's board of directors made the site selection at a meeting in Dallas on Tuesday night, according to the Associated Press. Sematech spokesmen could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sematech to Forgo Government Funding: The 7-year-old computer chip research consortium is expected to formally announce today that it will give up the $90 million a year it now gets from the Defense Department by late 1996. The consortium will continue its work using corporate funds, which currently account for half the consortium's budget. Sematech and its backers--most of the major U.S. chip makers--indicated earlier this year that they will soon give up government funding.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a quiet hilltop overlooking this capital city's downtown, a state-of-the-art computer chip factory stands partly empty, a monument to the problems that have plagued one of America's boldest experiments in technology development.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|