Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSemen
IN THE NEWS

Semen

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1998
Infectious HIV may be present in the semen of men being treated with powerful new drug regimens that reduce the level of virus in their blood below the limits of detectability, according to researchers from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. "It suggests that, even if you don't have detectable virus in your blood and are on highly active retrovirals, you should consider yourself potentially contagious sexually and practice safe sex," said Dr. Roger J. Pomerantz of Jefferson.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Aamera Jiwaji
An Israeli court has punished a Palestinian prisoner whose semen was smuggled from jail. Abdul Karim Rimawi was fined about $1,499 Thursday and deprived of family visits for two months, according to a statement by the Palestinian Prisoner Club Assn. The emailed statement read, "The punishment of Rimawi is the first such kind of punishment in the history of courts. " Rimawi, who has served 12 years of his 25-year sentence, helped smuggle his semen from jail two years ago. Eight months ago, his wife gave birth to a boy.  Clandestine in-vitro fertilization is viewed as the latest form of resistance by Palestinians.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police were investigating the theft of $10,000 worth of frozen bull semen and embryos from Cal Poly Luis Obispo, a school spokesman said. Stolen was a container holding six one-ounce vials of semen and 25 embryos, all frozen by liquid nitrogen to 100 degrees below zero, spokesman Don McCaleb said. No arrests have been made and the dairy building burglary was not believed to be a prank, he said.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By David Pierson
China already consumes half the world's pork. But to ensure it has a steady supply of hogs, it's struck a deal with Britain to import $73.5 million worth of premium pig semen. The agreement was brokered with the help of British Prime Minister David Cameron, who just completed a three-day visit to China. “We're doing all we can to ensure that businesses up and down the country reap the rewards from our relationship with China. And that includes our pig farmers,” said a statement from Cameron's office, according to the Financial Times . “This new deal to export pig semen will mean Britain's best pigs will help sustain the largest pig population in the world.” The pig semen, both frozen and fresh, will reportedly be flown in starting early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1992 | JEFF KRAMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A probate judge on Wednesday ordered the destruction of a suicide victim's frozen sperm, but gave his stunned and sobbing lover 60 days to appeal the ruling to a higher court. The decision set the stage for a precedent-setting appellate showdown over the disposition of a dozen vials of sperm willed by William Kane of Malibu to his lover, Deborah Hecht, before his October, 1991, suicide.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Their names were Fuji, Judo, Mazda and Ryusho. Before they died of old age years ago, they left behind a genetic legacy worth millions of dollars for cattle breeder Don Lively, one that the Japanese contend is a stolen national treasure. The legacy is semen. The four Japanese bulls that provided it were brought to the United States in a shroud of secrecy 14 years ago. Some people say the semen is a rare commodity that could revolutionize the beef industry in both countries.
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | From Associated Press
More than one in every five semen samples from HIV-infected men contain live specimens of the virus that causes AIDS, demonstrating the high risk of unprotected sex, even with men showing no symptoms, researchers say. Dr. Ann C. Collier of the University of Washington in Seattle said a study of more than 100 semen samples taken from 16 HIV-positive men over a two-year period found live and infectious virus 22% of the time.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
One midnight last month, thieves invaded the Record Rancho dairy in San Jacinto in search of liquid treasure that is far more valuable, drop for drop, than the richest milk and easier to dispose of than rustled cows. Inside a steel tank, bathed in liquid nitrogen, the burglars found what they wanted--Vince Record's supply of frozen bull semen.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
DNA evidence got convicted rapist Kerry Kotler out of prison in 1992. Five years later, DNA evidence helped send him back. Kotler was convicted of raping a 20-year-old college student in 1995. DNA testing of semen on the victim's clothing showed it matched Kotler's. In 1992, Kotler was freed after serving 11 years of a 21- to 45-year term when attorneys Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld--the DNA experts on O.J.
NEWS
September 22, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
Monica S. Lewinsky denies that she kept a navy dress with a stain of the president's semen as a souvenir. But it was never laundered, she says, because she has her clothes cleaned just before she wears them--and she never wore that garment again. Lewinsky's description of her navy work dress--"it's not a cocktail dress"--was among grand jury materials released Monday by the House Judiciary Committee. Lewinsky testified that the telltale stain occurred during an encounter on Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2013 | By Richard Winton and Stephen Ceasar
Mark Berndt, the teacher who committed lewd acts against nearly two dozen Los Angeles schoolchildren, was sentenced Friday to 25 years in prison after facing the parents of his victims, many of whom berated him for stealing the innocence of their children. Berndt, who taught at Miramonte Elementary School for three decades, pleaded no contest to 23 counts of lewd conduct. The allegations against him included spoon-feeding semen to blindfolded children as part of what he purportedly called a "tasting game.
NEWS
January 17, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Some poor men are apparently allergic to their own semen, developing a mysterious flu-like illness after they have an ejaculation, Dutch researchers reported Monday. The condition, known as post-orgasmic illness syndrome or POIS, has been documented since 2002. Symptoms include feverishness, runny nose, extreme fatigue and burning eyes, which can last for up to a week. Some physicians had suggested that the disorder was psychosomatic, but Marcel Waldinger, a professor of sexual psychopharmacology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, and his colleagues demonstrated in two papers in the Journal of Sexual Medicine that the syndrome was allergic in nature and that it might be possible to desensitize men to the problem.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2007 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
A government analyst testified Thursday that semen recovered from a woman who was killed with two of her young daughters matched the DNA of a soldier acquitted of the decades-old crime. Jennifer Lehn, a forensic analyst for the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, told a military court that there was virtually no chance someone other than Master Sgt. Timothy B. Hennis matched the semen sample. She described the odds as 1 in 12.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2003 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Men exposed to pesticides widely used on crops are many times more likely to have defective sperm and low sperm counts than males with little or no exposure, according to a scientific study published today . The study provides new evidence supporting a theory that pesticides and other chemicals which mimic estrogen or block testosterone are harming human reproductive systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2003 | Tracy Wilson, Times Staff Writer
DNA testing of semen found in slain rape victim Cynthia Burger revealed a near-perfect match to blood taken from murder suspect Michael Schultz, a lab technician testified Wednesday. The Maryland-based technician told jurors that the odds the genetic evidence left at the crime scene belong to someone else are about 4 billion to 1. "The evidence is a match," said technician Wendy Magee, who compared the genetic material at the request of Ventura County prosecutors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California inmates have no constitutional right to impregnate their wives by mailing sperm from prison, a sharply divided federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Thursday. The 6-5 ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, in the case of an inmate serving a 111-year sentence, overturns a previous 2-1 decision by a 9th Circuit panel that described procreation as a fundamental right, even for prisoners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Orsak has a warning for women who try to have a baby through artificial insemination: Be certain that the donor of the semen is tested for the AIDS virus. She says that others may be as unsuspecting as she was 10 years ago when she went to a fertility clinic in Los Angeles in hope of having a child.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Sperm counts decrease during the summer, perhaps explaining the reduction in the birth rate during the spring in parts of the world with warm climates, according to a new study. The findings, which are being published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, may also help physicians treat male fertility problems. "It is more difficult for a man to impregnate a woman during the summertime than some other season, particularly the winter," said Dr. Richard J.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | MARC LEVY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It must have seemed like a bargain to New York mobster Antonino Parlavecchio and his wife. For about two years, they paid a guard at Allenwood Federal Prison $300 or less per trip to smuggle Parlavecchio's semen from the prison, where he was doing time for racketeering, to Maria, who was desperately trying to get pregnant. But guard Troy Kemmerer turned out to be not much of a bargain after all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals panel will reconsider its September ruling that prisoners have a right to mail their semen to artificially inseminate their loved ones. Without comment, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals set aside a decision allowing California inmate William Gerber to mail his semen to his 46-year-old wife. That 2-1 ruling will be reheard by 11 judges. No hearing has been set.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|