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BUSINESS
July 15, 1986
Sierracin, a Sylmar-based aerospace and electronics concern, is moving out of the semiconductor tooling business. The company said it sold its Irvine semiconductor tooling operation to Master Images of San Jose for an undisclosed price. Master Images also has acquired an option to buy Sierracin's Milpitas plant for semiconductor tooling. Sierracin said the business isn't in keeping with its long-range plans and that it will sell the Milpitas plant whether Master Images buys it or not.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 2011
Applied Materials Inc. said Wednesday it will buy Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates Inc. for $4.9 billion, gaining access to a leading supplier of ion implantation equipment used by chipmakers. Applied, based in Santa Clara, California, is paying $63 per share in cash, marking a 55.4 percent premium to Varian's closing price of $40.55 on Tuesday. Varian, based in Gloucester, Massachusetts, makes equipment that lowers costs and improves the productivity of its customers, Applied Materials says.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 1987
The computer maker said it will close its semiconductor operations in Minnesota and move the work to California at a cost of 900 jobs. A Minnesota semiconductor plant in Eagan and a packaging operation in Roseville, which were part of the old Sperry operation, will be closed by December. The work from both places will be moved to Rancho Bernardo, Calif., which was part of the old Burroughs. About 100 Minnesota workers will be offered jobs at the Rancho Bernardo plant, Unisys said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Gerald A. "Jerry" Lawson, an electronics engineer and video game pioneer who led the team that developed the first cartridge-based home video game console system to hit the market in the mid-1970s, has died. He was 70. Lawson, who lived in Santa Clara, died April 9 of complications of diabetes in El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, said his daughter, Karen Lawson. One of a small number of African American engineers working in Silicon Valley, Lawson joined Fairchild Semiconductor in Mountain View in 1970 as an applications engineer working with the sales department.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1989 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
John D. Poe grew up in northeast Montana in a hamlet called Medicine Lake, where his grandfather and father ran a drugstore for 75 years. The younger Poe opted for the electronics business, but he's brought aid to the sickly as well. In Poe's case, the ailing patient was a business, Semtech Corp. in Newbury Park, a tiny semiconductor maker founded in 1960. After humming along for 20 years, Semtech by late 1985 was losing money and in danger of collapse. So it hired Poe. On his first day on the job, Poe was told Semtech did not have enough money to meet its payroll.
NEWS
January 14, 1987
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. has banned pregnant women from semiconductor production lines in response to a study finding high miscarriage rates in certain chip-making jobs, the company said. The company, which has 4,000 female production workers at five chip plants in Pennsylvania, Missouri and Florida, is believed to be the nation's first semiconductor manufacturer to impose such a ban.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1987
Trio-Tech International posted a $1.2-million loss for its fiscal year ended June 26, more than double its $541,000 loss in fiscal 1986. The San Fernando maker of semiconductor testing equipment said its annual sales fell 6%, to $15.4 million, from $16.3 million. Trio-Tech said the loss reflected lower demand for its products caused by the slump in the semiconductor industry.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1987
Diodes Inc., a semiconductor maker headquartered in Chatsworth, reported a $177,781 profit for its fiscal first quarter, against a year-earlier loss of $135,475. The net income, equal to 8 cents a share, came on a 46% jump in sales for the quarter ended July 31, from $2.8 million to $4.1 million. David M.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1997 | Dow Jones
Microsemi Corp. has acquired PPC Products Corp., a Riviera Beach, Fla., supplier of power transistors and other products. Financial terms were not disclosed. Microsemi said PPC had revenue of $6 million in the last 12 months. Microsemi, a semiconductor devices maker, reported annual sales of $157.4 million.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1986
The company said that its Sunnyvale, Calif., division will shift high-volume production of semiconductor components to outside merchant vendors and that the division will focus on advanced development and pilot-line fabrication of electronic components. There were 325 employees at Sunnyvale before the change.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Texas Instruments Inc., seeking to grow its semiconductor chip business by acquisition, plans to buy Santa Clara, Calif.-based National Semiconductor Corp. for $6.5 billion. Dallas-based TI and National Semiconductor each make chips used in consumer electronics — including cellphones and tablet computers — and in industrial equipment. But their individual products — TI makes about 30,000 items and National Semiconductor makes about 12,000 — don't overlap much, experts said.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2011 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
President Obama paid a quick West Coast sales call for his education and high-tech agenda, dining with industry royalty at a private meeting in Silicon Valley before touring a state-of-the-art semiconductor plant in Oregon. After visiting with a group of science fair students and peering at the image of atoms seen through an electron magnoscope, Obama renewed the theme sounded in his State of the Union address, with a nod toward his recent focus on deficit reduction. "Even as we have to live within our means, we can't sacrifice investments in our future," Obama told several hundred guests and employees gathered at Intel Corp.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2010 | By Steve Johnson
To help make football a little safer, Intel Corp. last month proposed having players' helmets outfitted with microprocessors that would wirelessly alert doctors if the athletes suffered a hit hard enough to cause head injuries. And why not? Microchips aren't just for ATMs, airport check-in kiosks, pacemakers and ocean monitoring sensors anymore. They're also being installed in a staggering array of items that were once decidedly low-tech ? including gravestones, fish lures and writing pens.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2010 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Two former executives at Vitesse Semiconductor Corp. were indicted Friday by a federal grand jury on charges of defrauding investors in the Camarillo technology firm by overstating its revenue and manipulating stock options to secretly reward employees. Vitesse founder and former Chief Executive Louis Tomasetta and former Executive Vice President Eugene Hovanec were released on bond after pleading not guilty in federal court in New York. They are charged with securities fraud, falsifying corporate records and conspiracy.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2010 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Giant computer chip maker Intel Corp. agreed to accept broad new restrictions on the way it does business to settle federal charges that it abused its dominant market position to stifle competition over the last decade. Wednesday's agreement with the Federal Trade Commission could alter the course of the global semiconductor industry, as well as strengthen the hand of the FTC as it looks at other antitrust allegations in the technology sector, including those involving such leading players as Google Inc. and Apple Inc. "I think it signals the FTC is trying to crack down on anticompetitive behavior in this industry," said George H. Pike, an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law who teaches intellectual property and writes about information technology issues and the law. Intel's agreement, which would be made final after a 30-day period of public comment, would prohibit the Santa Clara firm from using certain rewards, threats and other tactics that regulators say induced computer makers Dell Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and others to buy exclusively from Intel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Production resumed Wednesday at a manufacturing plant in Fullerton after an immigration raid that resulted in the arrests of 43 workers and the temporary shutdown of the facility. Employers at Terra Universal Inc., which produces equipment for semiconductor and pharmaceutical manufacturers, spent the day reassuring customers, checking employees' documents and questioning why they were targeted, according to the company's attorney. Chief Operating Officer Ken Harms said the raid took him by surprise and disrupted the entire plant.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1989 | From The Washington Post
Sematech, a government-funded consortium formed to enhance the U.S. semiconductor industry, has been successful so far but should not necessarily be used as a role model for other industries, according to a new government study. The report, prepared by the Commerce Department and issued by the Pentagon, generally praises the work of the 2-year-old consortium, whose members are charged with the task of developing technologies needed to produce sophisticated semiconductors. The Bush Administration has recommended continuing Sematech's $100-million annual government funding next year, an amount matched by the 14 member companies.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman
International Rectifier Corp. said Thursday it would close its El Segundo semiconductor plant as part of a plan to slash its global workforce 18%. The El Segundo company announced the closure after reporting a fiscal second-quarter loss of $186.1 million, or $2.56 a share. The company reported a profit of $313,000 in the same quarter a year earlier. International Rectifier said it planned to eliminate 850 jobs in the current fiscal year, which ends June 30.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Irvine-based semiconductor manufacturer Microsemi Corp. will retain Chief Executive James Peterson after a board review concluded that he didn't receive bachelor's or master's degrees from Brigham Young University. Peterson will pay $100,000 to the company and forgo a bonus for the current fiscal year, Microsemi said. During the last three years, his annual bonuses averaged about $680,000, the company said. Microsemi will also delay the vesting of Peterson's stock grants by one year.
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