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Semiconductor Industry

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BUSINESS
September 12, 1985 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
A gradual recovery has begun in certain parts of the troubled semiconductor industry, despite continued overall weakness in August, the Semiconductor Industry Assn. said Wednesday. The trade association's monthly report on the industry's book-to-bill ratio, one barometer of the semiconductor market, showed that only $74 in new U.S. orders were received for every $100 worth of outgoing shipments--about the same as in recent months.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 29, 2007 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Duane Wadsworth finds meaning in the Elmat crystal puller. The semiconductor industry artifact was one of the first machines to make high-purity silicon in the 1960s, when computers were the size of rooms and their central processing units were just starting to be replaced by the small chips that gave birth to today's electronics industry.
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NEWS
April 14, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced Wednesday that it is launching a special pilot inspection program to evaluate job safety protection programs in California's semiconductor manufacturing industry. OSHA spokesman Joe Kirkbride said such a pilot inspection program is "unique in the nation."
BUSINESS
November 13, 2003 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Applied Materials Inc. said Wednesday that it ended three straight quarters of losses with a modest profit in its fiscal fourth quarter and predicted surprisingly healthy revenue growth for the next three months. The upbeat results from the world's largest maker of equipment for producing computer chips coincided with an industry report predicting more than 20% growth in worldwide chip sales next year to nearly $210 billion.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1986
The Japanese electronics conglomerate jumped from the No. 3 position to the top spot in 1985 with $1.98 billion in sales, according to preliminary estimates released by Dataquest Inc., a market research company based in Cupertino, Calif. Motorola of Schaumburg, Ill., remained No. 2 with $1.85 billion in semiconductor sales, while Texas Instruments of Dallas fell from the top spot--which it had occupied since the 1950s--to third with $1.76 billion, Dataquest said.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Against all expectations and predictions of recent years, momentum in one of the world's most important industries has shifted. U.S. companies are gaining global market share in semiconductors, the electronic chips that these days power not only computers but car engines, medical devices, telephones and toys. This year U.S. companies are likely to capture 40% of the $58-billion world semiconductor market, continuing a rising trend in the last two years.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Milpitas-based LSI Logic, employees on the way to the cafeteria crowd around a stock-quote terminal to check the latest rise in the company's shares. After a sixteen-fold increase in value since 1992, many are cashing in stock options to buy new cars or move into larger homes.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Considering the backdrop of tense relations between the United States and Japan, members of the Electronic Industries Assn. of Japan could not have expected a warm reception for the message they delivered to their American counterparts in Honolulu last week. With a huge trade deficit looming and the harsh criticism of American workers by some Japanese leaders still ringing in their ears, members of the San Jose-based Semiconductor Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The waning days of 1989, a year that generated more than its share of disappointment and frustration for International Business Machines, brought yet more bad news to the world's largest electronics maker. Perkin-Elmer, a Connecticut company that is sole supplier of a sophisticated semiconductor-manufacturing machine critical to future generations of practically every IBM product, was entertaining an attractive bid to sell the division making that machine to a Japanese company.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Intel Corp., leading a resurgence by the U.S. computer chip industry, said Tuesday that it will spend $2.5 billion on capital equipment and research and development next year. The ambitious spending program is being driven by heavy demand for Intel's 486 chip--now the central processor of choice for desktop personal computers--and strong sales of other PC-related products. The Santa Clara-based company will invest $1.6 billion in plant and equipment next year, up from $1.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2002 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Chip-equipment maker Applied Materials Inc. on Monday announced that it will eliminate 1,750 jobs, or 11% of its work force, to cope with a slump in the market for computers and other high-tech devices. Santa Clara, Calif.-based Applied, the world's largest manufacturer of machines used to make semiconductors, said the job cuts will include 800 workers from its Silicon Valley operations and 200 from its Austin, Texas, facility.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only in the semiconductor industry would news of the biggest sales drop in history be cause for celebration. This week, the industry's main trade group said worldwide revenue in June fell more than 8% from May and more than 30% from a year earlier, to $11.6 billion. That puts chip sales back to July 1999 levels. Chips are used in everything from PCs to cell phones, hand-held computers and other technology hardware, and since last winter all those markets have slowed dramatically.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2001 | Reuters
After one of its biggest slumps, the semiconductor industry will rebound in the second half of this year, grow 20% next year and 25% in 2003, the Semiconductor Industry Assn. said. What distinguishes this slump from the last one, which began in 1996 when the industry waited 12 quarters before cutting back on capacity, is that this time chip companies started paring capacity in only two quarters, the trade group said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a respected high-tech firm whose value increased thirty-fold in a year and is rapidly growing out of its headquarters in Alhambra. But Ortel Corp.--now a branch of Lucent Technologies--also uses some of the world's deadliest gases, and it's moving to a site in Irwindale that sits within 1,300 feet of two schools and a residential area. The company's current plans say a worst-case gas release would spread a toxic cloud more than 3,600 feet.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2000 | Reuters
The global semiconductor industry should grow at a compound annual average growth rate of 20% through 2003, driven in part by the increasing pervasiveness of the Internet, the Semiconductor Industry Assn. said in its midyear forecast. The industry has not seen such growth since the 1993-95 period, the association noted. The overall growth of the semiconductor industry will be 31% in 2000, with revenue of $195 billion, and expanding 25% to $244 billion in 2001, the SIA said.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Applied Materials Inc., the largest manufacturer of chip-making equipment, said Tuesday that it will cut 2,000 jobs, or 15% of its work force, as it grapples with the Asia economic crisis and a shift to cheaper computers. The announcement, which came two weeks after the company reported a 51% drop in quarterly profit, is the latest sign of a downturn in the semiconductor industry. The company said it would begin notifying affected employees today.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cavernous concrete shell rising from the mud in this community south of Portland echoes with the whining drills of construction workers. They are rushing to complete a $400-million semiconductor production facility for Silicon Valley chip maker Integrated Digital Technologies. Across a nearby field, Intel Corp. is breaking ground on a $2.2-billion complex. LSI Logic, another Silicon Valley company, is scouring the neighborhood for a place to build its newest plant.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | Reuters
The worldwide semiconductor industry will end 1997 with sluggish growth of 5.5%, reaching $131.9 billion in sales, but a rebound is expected next year, the San Jose-based Semiconductor Industry Assn. said in its annual forecast. This year the semiconductor industry was recouping from its first drop in sales in almost 10 years because of a collapse of memory chip prices and an ensuing inventory glut in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1997 | LISA ADDISON
Irvine Valley College has been awarded a $107,384 grant from the California Community College chancellor's office to expand training opportunities in the semiconductor industry. The campus and Orange Coast College collaborated with Motorola of Irvine and Rockwell International of Newport Beach to start a training center for the Southern California semiconductor industry. Through the joint program, the community colleges will develop a coordinated corporate training program for employees.
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