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BUSINESS
June 12, 2003 | From Reuters
The Semiconductor Industry Assn. cut its forecast for growth in global sales of semiconductors in 2003 by nearly half, citing anemic spending on information technology, the SARS epidemic and the war in Iraq. Sales of chips will rise 10.1% to $154.9 billion this year, the association said in its midyear forecast. That was down sharply from its November 2002 forecast of an increase of 19.8%.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
The Semiconductor Industry Assn. cut its forecast for the market's growth this year to 1.8% on Wednesday, citing falling prices for memory chips and microprocessors. Sales of processors will drop 1.6% to $32.6 billion, the San Jose-based group said. Revenue from flash memory chips, used in digital cameras and music players, will be little changed, the trade association said. It had earlier forecast a 10% rise in total chip sales this year.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 2003 | From Reuters
The Semiconductor Industry Assn. cut its forecast for growth in global sales of semiconductors in 2003 by nearly half, citing anemic spending on information technology, the SARS epidemic and the war in Iraq. Sales of chips will rise 10.1% to $154.9 billion this year, the association said in its midyear forecast. That was down sharply from its November 2002 forecast of an increase of 19.8%.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | STUART AUERBACH, The Washington Post
Reagan Administration trade officials believe that Japan is conducting an orchestrated campaign of disinformation to provide a rationale for the failure of Japanese companies to increase their purchases of U.S. semiconductors. In late December, Japanese newspapers splashed a story over their front pages that the country's National Space Development Agency was postponing a launch because of defective U.S.-made semiconductors in the rocket.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
The Semiconductor Industry Assn. cut its forecast for the market's growth this year to 1.8% on Wednesday, citing falling prices for memory chips and microprocessors. Sales of processors will drop 1.6% to $32.6 billion, the San Jose-based group said. Revenue from flash memory chips, used in digital cameras and music players, will be little changed, the trade association said. It had earlier forecast a 10% rise in total chip sales this year.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1989 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
In the cooling trade war with Japan, the high-technology front is heating up again. The transpacific bickering about the 1986 computer chip trade agreement has been redoubled. From the West come well-worn complaints that Japan isn't living up to its end of the bargain, and from the East, plaintive rejoinders that U.S. chip makers are exaggerating the terms of the pact. The buzzwords of the debate have been trade sanctions and market share, but the heart of the matter, as ever, is symbolism.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversial 1986 U.S.-Japan Semiconductor Trade Agreement has partially achieved its goal of opening the Japanese market to foreign-made chips, according to a study by the Semiconductor Industry Assn., but an extension of the pact is necessary because Japan has not fully complied with its terms. In its fourth annual progress report on the trade agreement, the SIA said foreign chip producers--primarily American firms--had increased their share of the Japanese market to 13.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Semiconductor Industry Assn. said Wednesday that worldwide sales of computer chips will show almost no growth for 1990, another indication that the high-technology sector is feeling the effects of the weak economy. In its annual market forecast, the industry trade group projected 1990 semiconductor sales of all manufacturers worldwide at $49.5 billion, up only slightly from $48.8 billion in 1989. But the SIA was extremely optimistic about the future, projecting a 12.5% increase to $55.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Semiconductor manufacturers have reached an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency to trim use of long-lived chemicals that contribute to global warming. Under a voluntary program announced Friday, members of the Semiconductor Industry Assn. agreed to reduce use of "perfluorocompounds" over the course of this decade by 10% from 1995 levels.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Semiconductor manufacturers have reached an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency to trim use of long-lived chemicals that contribute to global warming. Under a voluntary program announced Friday, members of the Semiconductor Industry Assn. agreed to reduce use of "perfluorocompounds" over the course of this decade by 10% from 1995 levels.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversial 1986 U.S.-Japan Semiconductor Trade Agreement has partially achieved its goal of opening the Japanese market to foreign-made chips, according to a study by the Semiconductor Industry Assn., but an extension of the pact is necessary because Japan has not fully complied with its terms. In its fourth annual progress report on the trade agreement, the SIA said foreign chip producers--primarily American firms--had increased their share of the Japanese market to 13.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Semiconductor Industry Assn. said Wednesday that worldwide sales of computer chips will show almost no growth for 1990, another indication that the high-technology sector is feeling the effects of the weak economy. In its annual market forecast, the industry trade group projected 1990 semiconductor sales of all manufacturers worldwide at $49.5 billion, up only slightly from $48.8 billion in 1989. But the SIA was extremely optimistic about the future, projecting a 12.5% increase to $55.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1989 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
In the cooling trade war with Japan, the high-technology front is heating up again. The transpacific bickering about the 1986 computer chip trade agreement has been redoubled. From the West come well-worn complaints that Japan isn't living up to its end of the bargain, and from the East, plaintive rejoinders that U.S. chip makers are exaggerating the terms of the pact. The buzzwords of the debate have been trade sanctions and market share, but the heart of the matter, as ever, is symbolism.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | STUART AUERBACH, The Washington Post
Reagan Administration trade officials believe that Japan is conducting an orchestrated campaign of disinformation to provide a rationale for the failure of Japanese companies to increase their purchases of U.S. semiconductors. In late December, Japanese newspapers splashed a story over their front pages that the country's National Space Development Agency was postponing a launch because of defective U.S.-made semiconductors in the rocket.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feuding computer chip vendors Intel Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices both reported better-than-expected quarterly earnings on Thursday, with AMD gaining from its clone version of a key Intel chip even as Intel demonstrated its ability to counter the clone threat. Both companies also appeared to be benefiting from the renewed strength in the chip business and from the absence of a much-feared drop-off in demand for personal computers.
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