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Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp

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BUSINESS
February 1, 2005
* Eastman Kodak Co. said it would buy printing technology firm Creo Inc. for about $980 million in cash to push more aggressively into commercial printing. * Downtown Los Angeles residents, many of whom have moved to the city's core as part of a residential boom, have a higher average income than the rest of the county, according to a study by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.
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BUSINESS
February 11, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Export-Import Bank has effectively rejected a Chinese company's request for a loan guarantee to buy chip-making equipment from a U.S. supplier, a victory for those who contend Uncle Sam shouldn't subsidize China's growing chip industry. Ex-Im Bank Chairman Philip Merrill decided this week to put on hold a request by China's leading semiconductor maker, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp., for a $769-million loan guarantee, industry and congressional sources said Thursday.
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BUSINESS
February 11, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Export-Import Bank has effectively rejected a Chinese company's request for a loan guarantee to buy chip-making equipment from a U.S. supplier, a victory for those who contend Uncle Sam shouldn't subsidize China's growing chip industry. Ex-Im Bank Chairman Philip Merrill decided this week to put on hold a request by China's leading semiconductor maker, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp., for a $769-million loan guarantee, industry and congressional sources said Thursday.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2005
* Eastman Kodak Co. said it would buy printing technology firm Creo Inc. for about $980 million in cash to push more aggressively into commercial printing. * Downtown Los Angeles residents, many of whom have moved to the city's core as part of a residential boom, have a higher average income than the rest of the county, according to a study by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
In a five-story factory nearly the size of three football fields, technicians clad in spacesuit-like attire work around the clock producing silicon chips at Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. The company, the world's largest contract chip maker, is a source of pride in Taiwan. It's what people point to when they say the "Made in Taiwan" label is no longer a symbol of shoddy umbrellas, sneakers, radios and trinkets the island was known to churn out.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2003 | James Flanigan
The last time Beijing and Taipei had a major public spat, in 1996, the U.S. president dispatched destroyers to the Taiwan Strait and billions of dollars of nervous capital flowed out of the island nation to safe-haven deposits in Southern California. Last week, things were very different. Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao, who was visiting Washington, and Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian quarreled loudly at long distance. The U.S.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Intel Corp.'s plan to open a $2.5-billion microchip manufacturing plant in China marks a milestone in the Asian nation's drive to develop a sophisticated electronics industry. But in the United States, the project could spark concerns about technology transfer and the continued buildup of higher-end production work and jobs overseas.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Taiwan's large and growing semiconductor industry, the future could hardly look brighter. Already a major world producer, its state-of-the-art silicon chip factories sit barely 100 miles across the Taiwan Strait from China, the biggest emerging high-tech market anywhere--a market with which it shares a common language, culture and heritage.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2004 | Tyler Marshall and Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writers
China's drive to become a leading global supplier of semiconductors within a decade is rapidly propelling that nation up the technology ladder -- and creating new trade tensions with the United States. U.S. high-tech industry executives contend that China has an arsenal of unfair tactics at its disposal, including complicated, China-only technical standards that are in the works and a tax they say discriminates against foreign chip makers. At the urging of U.S.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't unusual for Y.L. Wang to spend weekends at the factory he helped manage for Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corp., one of the biggest chip-making companies in the world. But he had never before seen his colleague C.Y. Shih at the plant on a weekend until that Saturday in September 2001. He'd never seen anyone making so many photocopies either. Shih, a manager in TSMC's technology transfer division, was huddled over the copier that weekend amassing piles and piles of paper.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2002 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
SHANGHAI -- Richard Chang, a devout Christian raised in Taiwan and educated in the United States, has opened a $1.6-billion semiconductor factory here and plans to build a church for his 3,000 employees. Chinese officials have displayed a cool, some would say hostile, attitude toward foreign religions. But they have put out the welcome mat for Chang because they desperately need his expertise.
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