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BUSINESS
December 16, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an ominous new twist to the Pentium chip controversy, computer users in corporations around the world are rushing to establish whether a flaw in the Intel microprocessor may have resulted in miscalculations that could make them vulnerable to lawsuits or trouble from government agencies.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 2011
Applied Materials Inc. said Wednesday it will buy Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates Inc. for $4.9 billion, gaining access to a leading supplier of ion implantation equipment used by chipmakers. Applied, based in Santa Clara, California, is paying $63 per share in cash, marking a 55.4 percent premium to Varian's closing price of $40.55 on Tuesday. Varian, based in Gloucester, Massachusetts, makes equipment that lowers costs and improves the productivity of its customers, Applied Materials says.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 2000 | Reuters
The global semiconductor industry should grow at a compound annual average growth rate of 20% through 2003, driven in part by the increasing pervasiveness of the Internet, the Semiconductor Industry Assn. said in its midyear forecast. The industry has not seen such growth since the 1993-95 period, the association noted. The overall growth of the semiconductor industry will be 31% in 2000, with revenue of $195 billion, and expanding 25% to $244 billion in 2001, the SIA said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Gerald A. "Jerry" Lawson, an electronics engineer and video game pioneer who led the team that developed the first cartridge-based home video game console system to hit the market in the mid-1970s, has died. He was 70. Lawson, who lived in Santa Clara, died April 9 of complications of diabetes in El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, said his daughter, Karen Lawson. One of a small number of African American engineers working in Silicon Valley, Lawson joined Fairchild Semiconductor in Mountain View in 1970 as an applications engineer working with the sales department.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1989 | From Reuters
Digital Equipment Corp. said it has developed a new application in semiconductor processing that can more than double computer performance compared to conventional circuit board technology. The company said its "high-density signal carrier" is an advance over current technology because it uses new materials and manufacturing methods.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Japan's minister of international trade and industry said Wednesday that he and U.S. Trade Representative Clayton K. Yeutter have agreed on steps that could lead to a new understanding of a bilateral agreement on trade involving semiconductors and the lifting of U.S. sanctions against Japan by mid-May. After a three-hour meeting with Yeutter, the minister, Hajime Tamura, told reporters that he had written a statement and that Yeutter had agreed with it. The statement says U.S.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Worldwide sales of semiconductors fell 2.4% in February from January, to $10.4 billion, the Semiconductor Industry Assn. said. Sales declined slightly in four major markets, with the largest drop in Japan, where sales fell by 4.4%, in part because of a 3% rise in the value of the dollar to the Japanese yen, San Jose-based SIA said. February's sales totals were 15.5% below the same period in 1996. In North and South America, February billings approached $3.41 billion, down 0.6% from January.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | Reuters
Semiconductor equipment makers based in North America posted record orders of $3 billion in October, 17% higher than shipments in the same period, according to trade group Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International. The so-called book-to-bill was 1.17, meaning that for every $1.17 in orders taken, $1.00 in chip-making equipment was shipped. The three-month average of $3.04 billion is 5% higher than the September 2000 level.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Semiconductor sales rose 21% in the third quarter from a year ago as companies sold more chips for products such as wireless phones, an industry group said. Semiconductor sales rose to $36.9 billion from $30.6 billion a year earlier, said a spokesman for the San Jose-based Semiconductor Industry Assn. Sales rose 8.2% from $34.1 billion in the second quarter, the association said. It said the increase comes as spending on capital equipment and software by U.S. companies rose by 6.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Atmel Corp. said it is suing Vitesse Semiconductor Corp., alleging that Vitesse improperly hired away Atmel employees who it claims have disclosed confidential information to help Vitesse build a new chip plant in Colorado Springs, Colo. Atmel, a San Jose-based maker of specialty computer chips, said three former management-level employees who have since gone to work for Camarillo-based Vitesse are also encouraging current Atmel employees to join Vitesse.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Texas Instruments Inc., seeking to grow its semiconductor chip business by acquisition, plans to buy Santa Clara, Calif.-based National Semiconductor Corp. for $6.5 billion. Dallas-based TI and National Semiconductor each make chips used in consumer electronics — including cellphones and tablet computers — and in industrial equipment. But their individual products — TI makes about 30,000 items and National Semiconductor makes about 12,000 — don't overlap much, experts said.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2011 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
President Obama paid a quick West Coast sales call for his education and high-tech agenda, dining with industry royalty at a private meeting in Silicon Valley before touring a state-of-the-art semiconductor plant in Oregon. After visiting with a group of science fair students and peering at the image of atoms seen through an electron magnoscope, Obama renewed the theme sounded in his State of the Union address, with a nod toward his recent focus on deficit reduction. "Even as we have to live within our means, we can't sacrifice investments in our future," Obama told several hundred guests and employees gathered at Intel Corp.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2010 | By Steve Johnson
To help make football a little safer, Intel Corp. last month proposed having players' helmets outfitted with microprocessors that would wirelessly alert doctors if the athletes suffered a hit hard enough to cause head injuries. And why not? Microchips aren't just for ATMs, airport check-in kiosks, pacemakers and ocean monitoring sensors anymore. They're also being installed in a staggering array of items that were once decidedly low-tech ? including gravestones, fish lures and writing pens.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2010 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Two former executives at Vitesse Semiconductor Corp. were indicted Friday by a federal grand jury on charges of defrauding investors in the Camarillo technology firm by overstating its revenue and manipulating stock options to secretly reward employees. Vitesse founder and former Chief Executive Louis Tomasetta and former Executive Vice President Eugene Hovanec were released on bond after pleading not guilty in federal court in New York. They are charged with securities fraud, falsifying corporate records and conspiracy.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2010 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Giant computer chip maker Intel Corp. agreed to accept broad new restrictions on the way it does business to settle federal charges that it abused its dominant market position to stifle competition over the last decade. Wednesday's agreement with the Federal Trade Commission could alter the course of the global semiconductor industry, as well as strengthen the hand of the FTC as it looks at other antitrust allegations in the technology sector, including those involving such leading players as Google Inc. and Apple Inc. "I think it signals the FTC is trying to crack down on anticompetitive behavior in this industry," said George H. Pike, an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law who teaches intellectual property and writes about information technology issues and the law. Intel's agreement, which would be made final after a 30-day period of public comment, would prohibit the Santa Clara firm from using certain rewards, threats and other tactics that regulators say induced computer makers Dell Inc., Hewlett-Packard Co. and others to buy exclusively from Intel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Production resumed Wednesday at a manufacturing plant in Fullerton after an immigration raid that resulted in the arrests of 43 workers and the temporary shutdown of the facility. Employers at Terra Universal Inc., which produces equipment for semiconductor and pharmaceutical manufacturers, spent the day reassuring customers, checking employees' documents and questioning why they were targeted, according to the company's attorney. Chief Operating Officer Ken Harms said the raid took him by surprise and disrupted the entire plant.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2001 | BLOOMBERG NEWS
LSI Logic Corp., the No. 1 maker of custom semiconductors, on Sunday said it has licensed technology to IBM Corp. for making specialized semiconductors that run communication devices. Terms weren't disclosed. IBM, the No. 1 computer maker, said it will use LSI's digital signal processor core, software and tools to expand IBM's system-on-a-chip products. DSPs translate light, sound and other signals into digital computer language.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman
International Rectifier Corp. said Thursday it would close its El Segundo semiconductor plant as part of a plan to slash its global workforce 18%. The El Segundo company announced the closure after reporting a fiscal second-quarter loss of $186.1 million, or $2.56 a share. The company reported a profit of $313,000 in the same quarter a year earlier. International Rectifier said it planned to eliminate 850 jobs in the current fiscal year, which ends June 30.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2009 | BLOOMBERG NEWS
Intel Corp., the world's biggest maker of semiconductors, cut the price of some processors by as much as 48% as it confronts slumping demand and new lower-cost chips from Advanced Micro Devices Inc. The price of the Celeron 570 processor, designed for laptops, dropped 48% to $70, Intel said Monday. One of the company's quad-core desktop-computer models, which have four processors on one piece of silicon, dropped 40% to $316.
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