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BUSINESS
September 10, 1998 | Associated Press
Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., the world's largest consumer electronics manufacturer, will close down its computer chip-making operations in the United States by year's end. The move will affect about 340 employees at the Puyallup, Wash., factory of Matsushita Semiconductor Corp., an affiliate of Osaka, Japan-based Matsushita Electric Industrial. Matsushita sells products under the Panasonic, Quasar, National and Technics names.
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BUSINESS
September 10, 1998 | Associated Press
Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., the world's largest consumer electronics manufacturer, will close down its computer chip-making operations in the United States by year's end. The move will affect about 340 employees at the Puyallup, Wash., factory of Matsushita Semiconductor Corp., an affiliate of Osaka, Japan-based Matsushita Electric Industrial. Matsushita sells products under the Panasonic, Quasar, National and Technics names.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foreign Share of Japanese Semiconductor Market Slips: Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, citing figures from the U.S. trade representative's office, said the share of foreign chips in the Japanese market fell by 0.4 percentage point to 19.2% in the April-June quarter. It was the second consecutive quarterly decline. U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor said the United States is "extremely concerned" about the decline.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first floor of NEC's most sophisticated semiconductor plant stands empty, its future at the mercy of turbulence in the global chip industry. "Five years ago, we had a plan for that space," explained Yuji Sugita, a manager at NEC Kyushu Ltd., about an hour's train ride from the city of Fukuoka on the island of Kyushu. "Now we're not sure what will happen."
BUSINESS
June 10, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first floor of NEC's most sophisticated semiconductor plant stands empty, its future at the mercy of turbulence in the global chip industry. "Five years ago, we had a plan for that space," explained Yuji Sugita, a manager at NEC Kyushu Ltd., about an hour's train ride from the city of Fukuoka on the island of Kyushu. "Now we're not sure what will happen."
BUSINESS
January 12, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S.-Japan semiconductor agreement once hailed as a prime example of successful trade negotiations is rapidly becoming a symbol of mistrust and acrimony in ongoing trade talks between the two countries. The current talks on imports of U.S. automobiles, auto parts, telecommunication services, insurance, medical technology and conflicts over intellectual property rights are supposed to reach a first set of agreements in time for a scheduled Feb.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a press conference last week, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) and the chip research consortium Sematech went public with an accusation that many in the computer chip business have long advanced in private: Japanese vendors of chip-making gear are withholding their best technology from American companies--and sometimes delivering it late and at a premium price when they do make it available. These are serious charges.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American computer chip industry grew rapidly in 1994, but not rapidly enough to prevent U.S. firms from losing ground to overseas competitors for the first time in three years, according to data released Monday by Dataquest, a San Jose market researcher. The reversal underscores the continued strength of the Japanese semiconductor industry and the rise of powerful new players in East Asia.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1987 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Parkinson is a stubborn man. Whether his stubbornness pays off is, you might say, the $300-million question. Parkinson's Boise, Idaho company is among the few remaining American makers of the computer chip that is at the heart of the current U.S. trade dispute with Japan. As prices for these so-called D-RAM semiconductors sunk, profits from making them vanished and many U.S. manufacturers fled the D-RAM business, a strategic segment of an industry deemed vital to the U.S. economy.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Kobe Steel Ltd. and Texas Instruments Inc. of the United States signed an agreement today to manufacture advanced semiconductors in Japan. Kobe Steel spokesman Gary Tsuchida said Kobe Steel will own "a majority interest" in the venture to be named KTI Semiconductor Ltd. Under an agreement, a $350-million plant will be built in Hyogo in western Japan by the end of 1991. The venture will be capitalized at $57.9 million.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American computer chip industry grew rapidly in 1994, but not rapidly enough to prevent U.S. firms from losing ground to overseas competitors for the first time in three years, according to data released Monday by Dataquest, a San Jose market researcher. The reversal underscores the continued strength of the Japanese semiconductor industry and the rise of powerful new players in East Asia.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S.-Japan semiconductor agreement once hailed as a prime example of successful trade negotiations is rapidly becoming a symbol of mistrust and acrimony in ongoing trade talks between the two countries. The current talks on imports of U.S. automobiles, auto parts, telecommunication services, insurance, medical technology and conflicts over intellectual property rights are supposed to reach a first set of agreements in time for a scheduled Feb.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foreign Share of Japanese Semiconductor Market Slips: Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry, citing figures from the U.S. trade representative's office, said the share of foreign chips in the Japanese market fell by 0.4 percentage point to 19.2% in the April-June quarter. It was the second consecutive quarterly decline. U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor said the United States is "extremely concerned" about the decline.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a press conference last week, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) and the chip research consortium Sematech went public with an accusation that many in the computer chip business have long advanced in private: Japanese vendors of chip-making gear are withholding their best technology from American companies--and sometimes delivering it late and at a premium price when they do make it available. These are serious charges.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1987 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Parkinson is a stubborn man. Whether his stubbornness pays off is, you might say, the $300-million question. Parkinson's Boise, Idaho company is among the few remaining American makers of the computer chip that is at the heart of the current U.S. trade dispute with Japan. As prices for these so-called D-RAM semiconductors sunk, profits from making them vanished and many U.S. manufacturers fled the D-RAM business, a strategic segment of an industry deemed vital to the U.S. economy.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone sounded a conciliatory note Saturday over the decision by the United States to impose punitive tariffs in the trade dispute over semiconductors. "Japan wants to resolve the issue through consultations by explaining its stance thoroughly and correcting the points that need to be corrected," he was quoted by Kyodo News Service as saying.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Japan's minister of international trade and industry said Wednesday that he and U.S. Trade Representative Clayton K. Yeutter have agreed on steps that could lead to a new understanding of a bilateral agreement on trade involving semiconductors and the lifting of U.S. sanctions against Japan by mid-May. After a three-hour meeting with Yeutter, the minister, Hajime Tamura, told reporters that he had written a statement and that Yeutter had agreed with it. The statement says U.S.
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