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August 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chip Venture in the Works: Hitachi Ltd. and Texas Instruments Inc. are planning to build a $500-million semiconductor plant in the Dallas suburb of Richardson. The companies said talks are continuing and they intend to form a joint venture in the first half of next year. The plant would make 16- and 64-megabit dynamic random-access memory chips, known as DRAMs, which store data in computers and other electronic products. Initial production is scheduled for 1996.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Intel Corp., the world's largest chip maker, scaled back its second-quarter revenue forecast Thursday because of lower-than-expected demand for personal computer processors in Europe, sparking a steep slide in its stock in after-hours trading. The bad news from Intel probably will spur more losses today, after a rough Thursday on Wall Street, where U.S. stocks hit eight-month lows, analysts said. "I think everyone is going to get whacked [today]," said Dan Scovel, an analyst with Needham & Co.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Intel Corp., the world's largest chip maker, scaled back its second-quarter revenue forecast Thursday because of lower-than-expected demand for personal computer processors in Europe, sparking a steep slide in its stock in after-hours trading. The bad news from Intel probably will spur more losses today, after a rough Thursday on Wall Street, where U.S. stocks hit eight-month lows, analysts said. "I think everyone is going to get whacked [today]," said Dan Scovel, an analyst with Needham & Co.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chip Venture in the Works: Hitachi Ltd. and Texas Instruments Inc. are planning to build a $500-million semiconductor plant in the Dallas suburb of Richardson. The companies said talks are continuing and they intend to form a joint venture in the first half of next year. The plant would make 16- and 64-megabit dynamic random-access memory chips, known as DRAMs, which store data in computers and other electronic products. Initial production is scheduled for 1996.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
It was so rough last year for U.S. computer chip-makers that the telling of it begins like a Johnny Carson joke. "1985 was a bad year for the semiconductor industry" is the standard opening line. A securities analyst's report offers the straight line, heading a set of figures with: "How bad was it?" Of the dozens of possible rejoinders, not one is funny. It was so bad that the five leading U.S. sellers of chips posted losses totaling $343 million. (They had had profits of $1.3 billion in 1984.
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