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BUSINESS
October 4, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Against all expectations and predictions of recent years, momentum in one of the world's most important industries has shifted. U.S. companies are gaining global market share in semiconductors, the electronic chips that these days power not only computers but car engines, medical devices, telephones and toys. This year U.S. companies are likely to capture 40% of the $58-billion world semiconductor market, continuing a rising trend in the last two years.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American computer chip industry grew rapidly in 1994, but not rapidly enough to prevent U.S. firms from losing ground to overseas competitors for the first time in three years, according to data released Monday by Dataquest, a San Jose market researcher. The reversal underscores the continued strength of the Japanese semiconductor industry and the rise of powerful new players in East Asia.
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BUSINESS
December 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Intel Corp., leading a resurgence by the U.S. computer chip industry, said Tuesday that it will spend $2.5 billion on capital equipment and research and development next year. The ambitious spending program is being driven by heavy demand for Intel's 486 chip--now the central processor of choice for desktop personal computers--and strong sales of other PC-related products. The Santa Clara-based company will invest $1.6 billion in plant and equipment next year, up from $1.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Intel Corp., leading a resurgence by the U.S. computer chip industry, said Tuesday that it will spend $2.5 billion on capital equipment and research and development next year. The ambitious spending program is being driven by heavy demand for Intel's 486 chip--now the central processor of choice for desktop personal computers--and strong sales of other PC-related products. The Santa Clara-based company will invest $1.6 billion in plant and equipment next year, up from $1.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a press conference last week, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) and the chip research consortium Sematech went public with an accusation that many in the computer chip business have long advanced in private: Japanese vendors of chip-making gear are withholding their best technology from American companies--and sometimes delivering it late and at a premium price when they do make it available. These are serious charges.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American computer chip industry grew rapidly in 1994, but not rapidly enough to prevent U.S. firms from losing ground to overseas competitors for the first time in three years, according to data released Monday by Dataquest, a San Jose market researcher. The reversal underscores the continued strength of the Japanese semiconductor industry and the rise of powerful new players in East Asia.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1985 | Associated Press
The United States, Canada and Japan have agreed to eliminate most tariffs on imported computer parts, representatives of the three governments announced Friday. The move could reduce costs to U.S. computer manufacturers by $172 million a year, U.S. Trade Representative Clayton Yeutter said. Computer industry officials said the savings would come both through making imported parts less expensive and in reducing the cost of selling U.S. computer equipment abroad. The current U.S. tariff is 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1990 | MEL LEVINE, Rep. Mel Levine, (D-Santa Monica) is co-chairman of the Congressional HDTV caucus. and
As global upheavals have heralded the thawing of the Cold War, so too do they augur substantial cuts in our defense budget. If we are wise, we will use the coming peace dividend for more than federal deficit reduction. We will use it to plant the seeds for tomorrow's America, with increased investments in education, infrastructure, job training and technology development.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Against all expectations and predictions of recent years, momentum in one of the world's most important industries has shifted. U.S. companies are gaining global market share in semiconductors, the electronic chips that these days power not only computers but car engines, medical devices, telephones and toys. This year U.S. companies are likely to capture 40% of the $58-billion world semiconductor market, continuing a rising trend in the last two years.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a press conference last week, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) and the chip research consortium Sematech went public with an accusation that many in the computer chip business have long advanced in private: Japanese vendors of chip-making gear are withholding their best technology from American companies--and sometimes delivering it late and at a premium price when they do make it available. These are serious charges.
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