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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
A state appeals court ruled that a 5-year-old Native American child can be adopted by a non-Indian couple, dealing a blow to advocates who say tribes should determine the futures of such children. The Friday decision by a three-judge Court of Appeal panel in Santa Ana also limits the circumstances in which tribes can use a 1978 law allowing them to intervene when Native American children are placed with adoptive parents.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Hard Rock Cafe International Inc., known for its music-themed restaurants, said Monday it is developing two Florida casinos at a cost of $400 million with Cordish Co. and the Seminole tribe of American Indians. Hard Rock and Cordish are building the casinos in Tampa and Hollywood, Fla., on two Seminole reservations. Orlando-based Hard Rock will run the Hard Rock restaurants and shops, while the tribe will operate the casinos, Hard Rock said.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Hard Rock Cafe International Inc., known for its music-themed restaurants, said Monday it is developing two Florida casinos at a cost of $400 million with Cordish Co. and the Seminole tribe of American Indians. Hard Rock and Cordish are building the casinos in Tampa and Hollywood, Fla., on two Seminole reservations. Orlando-based Hard Rock will run the Hard Rock restaurants and shops, while the tribe will operate the casinos, Hard Rock said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996 | From Associated Press
A state appeals court ruled that a 5-year-old Native American child can be adopted by a non-Indian couple, dealing a blow to advocates who say tribes should determine the futures of such children. The Friday decision by a three-judge Court of Appeal panel in Santa Ana also limits the circumstances in which tribes can use a 1978 law allowing them to intervene when Native American children are placed with adoptive parents.
NEWS
April 1, 1985 | United Press International
A $1-million bingo game that Indian tribes in three states plan to conduct among themselves via satellite is getting the attention of authorities who say the interstate scheme may be illegal. A spokesman for the Muckleshoot Indians in Auburn said the bingo bonanza among tribes in Washington, California and Florida is scheduled for May 4. Satellite-linked television transmissions would allow players in the three states to compete in the six-hour event for prizes ranging from $10,000 to $250,000.
MAGAZINE
August 28, 1988 | LOIS GIBSON
WILLOW IS PLENTIFUL, flexible, tough and ubiquitous, and the furniture made from it possesses a timeless, rustic beauty. Seminole Indians bent cypress from Florida swamps, and Southwest tribes joined twigs with rawhide thongs. These Indians taught America's earliest settlers willow-craft and, hailed as folk art, the resulting handmade Appalachian "gypsy" chairs were proudly displayed in Victorian parlors. Every half-century or so, urbanites rediscover willow's charm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1993 | MARTIN MILLER
The bear and the rabbit ran wild. Nearby, a young boy beat his drum. Another stood ready to cast his net. The hunt was on. And probably because it took place in a somewhat cramped corner of the La Palma Branch Library on Wednesday afternoon, the hunt lasted only about 30 seconds. The brief scene, used to demonstrate hunting techniques, was part of a free program to teach children about American Indian lifestyles and customs from centuries ago.
SPORTS
July 25, 1985
In a story on the retirement of Cincinnati Bengals offensive lineman Mike Obrovac, the Associated Press said: "He is retiring to launch a career running bingo tours for Seminole Indians in the West." Don't laugh. Obrovac said he will be working with his oldest brother, Nicholas, who runs bingo bus tours in the state of Washington. "He's also the general manager of the bingo hall on the Muckle Shoot Reservation," Obrovac said. "Bingo is big there. The daily jackpots run as high as $90,000."
NEWS
January 7, 1987 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
The Miami River was once a crystal clear flow. Coconut palms lined the shore, and Seminole Indians paddled up the twisted path to a single trading post. But by the 1930s, the river had been dredged and stretched for barges and tankers. Fisheries and junkyards opened along the banks, and pollutants darkened the water into a brown ooze. As the decades passed, it was almost inevitable that this 5.2-mile meander would become the rusted-out back door for Miami's best-paying commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Oklahoma Indian tribe won a victory when an appeals court ruled that an Orange County Superior Court commissioner overstepped his authority in a custody dispute over a Seminole Indian child. In an opinion released Monday, the 4th District Court of Appeal overturned Commissioner Gale P. Hickman, who ruled in June that a baby girl was an "Indian child" under the definition in a federal law but that the membership criteria established by the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma were not reasonable.
OPINION
November 20, 2003 | James McWilliams, James E. McWilliams is an assistant professor of history at Texas State University-San Marcos and a contributing writer at Texas Observer.
Call the man dim, call him corrupt, but call him president until 2008. George W. Bush certainly has vulnerabilities, but he's been smart enough to model himself on a man who pioneered the fine art of political image-making: Andrew Jackson. Democrats, as a result, are doomed. In 1819, as the dust settled from his bloodthirsty and blatantly unconstitutional attack on the Seminole Indians, Jackson, then one of the nation's most revered generals, found himself on the congressional hot seat.
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