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Seminole Junior College

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SPORTS
April 14, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once a Pioneer, perhaps always one. At least that's the way it seems for Kevin Nykoluk, who etched his name into the Simi Valley High record book during his three-year varsity baseball career. Two years after leaving the Pioneer program, Nykoluk, 20, is still a pioneer, blazing a trail to Seminole, Okla. The sleepy town of 7,200 sits among gently rolling hills in the middle of Oklahoma and boasts a Wrangler Jeans distribution plant and the only children's museum in the state.
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SPORTS
April 14, 1995 | JOHN LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once a Pioneer, perhaps always one. At least that's the way it seems for Kevin Nykoluk, who etched his name into the Simi Valley High record book during his three-year varsity baseball career. Two years after leaving the Pioneer program, Nykoluk, 20, is still a pioneer, blazing a trail to Seminole, Okla. The sleepy town of 7,200 sits among gently rolling hills in the middle of Oklahoma and boasts a Wrangler Jeans distribution plant and the only children's museum in the state.
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SPORTS
November 23, 1989 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a town that few folks cared about 20 years ago, even in Oklahoma. Even in Seminole. But as the 1960s gave way to the '70s, a strange thing happened. The town's pride and jewel--Seminole Junior College--began raiding the rest of the country for black basketball players. Overnight, there was a competitive team here, instead of a middling, lusterless team. And suddenly, the town wasn't being ignored anymore. Suddenly, for miles around, people were toasting Seminole.
SPORTS
November 23, 1989 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a town that few folks cared about 20 years ago, even in Oklahoma. Even in Seminole. But as the 1960s gave way to the '70s, a strange thing happened. The town's pride and jewel--Seminole Junior College--began raiding the rest of the country for black basketball players. Overnight, there was a competitive team here, instead of a middling, lusterless team. And suddenly, the town wasn't being ignored anymore. Suddenly, for miles around, people were toasting Seminole.
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
The Angels farm system is widely held to be the worst in baseball, which made this month's draft an important tool in rebuilding. And though the team needed less than two weeks to reach contract agreements with 34 of its 39 draft picks, its biggest catch may get away: Left-hander Hunter Green, a hard-throwing 17-year-old from Kentucky, remains unsigned. Green, who posted a Twitter picture of himself in an Angels cap on draft day, is committed to the University of Kentucky. The team has also been unable to reach agreement with three of its other top six picks.
SPORTS
June 28, 1986
Bo Jackson, assigned by the Kansas City Royals to the Memphis Chicks of the Southern League, will be playing his home games in Tim McCarver Memorial Stadium, named for the former catcher who makes his home in Memphis. But why the Memorial? "They named it after my arm," McCarver said. Add McCarver: Here's how he once explained the success of Steve Carlton: "Carlton does not pitch to the hitter, he pitches through him. The batter hardly exists for Steve. He's playing an elevated game of catch."
SPORTS
October 4, 1997
Sally Thompson, executive director of the Los Angeles City Commission for Children, Youth and Their Families, was selected by Cal State Northridge President Blenda J. Wilson as the 15th and final member of the university's Task Force on Intercollegiate Athletics. BASEBALL Nykoluk signs: Kevin Nykoluk, a former Simi Valley High catcher who last played at Miami in 1996, was signed as a nondrafted free agent by the St. Louis Cardinals.
SPORTS
September 27, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY and JASON REID
If you treat 'em nice . . . they will come. That was the theme Sunday when the Dodgers closed their home season with a 10-7 victory over the San Diego Padres before 46,177. The Dodgers, while far from an on-the-field success (74-82), demonstrated again their artful public relations. At all 11 entrances to the stadium Sunday, uniformed Dodgers personally greeted startled fans, shaking hands and schmoozing.
SPORTS
June 21, 1995
It happened only three times during conference play last season, but the City Section won't allow it at all this fall. Conference football games that end in a tie after regulation will go into an overtime period. It is the first time in the history of the section that tiebreakers will be used during the regular season. Each team will get four consecutive plays from the opponent's 10-yard line.
NEWS
April 30, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A church bell summoned the Seminoles, the Creeks and their neighbors to a small brick church Saturday to mourn for a respected native American leader who lost his life in the nation's most recent tragedy. The death of Raymond Lee Johnson, 59, a member of the National Congress of American Indians, has been felt sharply in Wewoka, where sorrow seems to hang in the air like unsettled dust.
SPORTS
June 10, 1995 | Dana Haddad
Ginny Mike has 95 hits in her three-year college career, but the one swing of the bat she will never forget produced an error. Playing against two-time defending champion Arizona two weeks ago in the title game of the Women's College World Series, Mike, a junior outfielder from Camarillo High who bats ninth for UCLA's softball team, hit what appeared to be a harmless grounder to Wildcat third baseman Krista Gomez to lead off the bottom of the fifth inning.
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