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Semra Ozal

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March 22, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a teen-age typist, the vivacious daughter of a shipyard welder. He was a new-minted electrical engineer, the ambitious son of a provincial bank worker. Her typewriter broke down rather more often than usual, but he was always there to fix it--and perhaps to break it again as an excuse to return. Their courtship spiced office life at a backwater Turkish ministry in the stuffy, somnolent 1950s.
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NEWS
October 15, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was orchestrated by a French media guru and played out against a pulsating backdrop of African drum rhythms. Yet for all its fast-paced pizazz, the shindig to kick off the ruling Turkish Motherland Party's reelection bid was missing something. There was nary a mention of party founder and President Turgut Ozal, the leader who symbolizes the dramatic changes in Turkey over the last decade.
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NEWS
October 15, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was orchestrated by a French media guru and played out against a pulsating backdrop of African drum rhythms. Yet for all its fast-paced pizazz, the shindig to kick off the ruling Turkish Motherland Party's reelection bid was missing something. There was nary a mention of party founder and President Turgut Ozal, the leader who symbolizes the dramatic changes in Turkey over the last decade.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a teen-age typist, the vivacious daughter of a shipyard welder. He was a new-minted electrical engineer, the ambitious son of a provincial bank worker. Her typewriter broke down rather more often than usual, but he was always there to fix it--and perhaps to break it again as an excuse to return. Their courtship spiced office life at a backwater Turkish ministry in the stuffy, somnolent 1950s.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One image captures many of the contradictions that characterize Turkey's taboo-breaking First Lady, Semra Ozal, and her countrywomen. Wrapped in a white cloth, the wife of Turkish President Turgut Ozal appeared a picture of Muslim modesty during a recent pilgrimage to Mecca. But then she stood shoulder-to-shoulder with her husband, ignoring other Islamic customs by which women should be more deferential.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It all seemed so simple at first: Turkey's pro-Western First Lady Semra Ozal, long an influence on Turkish affairs of state, would quietly run for an official ruling party post. Her husband, President Turgut Ozal, could hardly have imagined that this would trigger an unprecedented revolt against him by a "holy alliance" of Islamic conservatives, which threatens not just to split the ruling Motherland Party but to undermine his regional leadership gains from the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
February 23, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Turgut Ozal fired Minister of Defense Husnu Dogan on Friday after his once-favorite cousin took the wrong side of a scorching family feud over the political ambitions of Ozal's wife, First Lady Semra Ozal. Dogan is the third senior defense official to leave office in Turkey since the start of the Persian Gulf crisis. His predecessor had resigned in October in another row involving the ruling Motherland Party.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Teen-agers who say no to drugs may feel alone but they are not, First Lady Nancy Reagan told members of an anti-drug youth convention on Thursday. "There are millions of kids who would stand by your side if they knew you needed help," Mrs. Reagan said in addressing the annual convention of the National Parents' Resource Institute for Drug Education, or PRIDE. "Standing for what you believe in can be difficult," she said. "It's hard to be your own person." Letters Ask for Help Mrs.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | MARY LOU LOPER
The situation in the Middle East contributed to the fanfare of interest in the visit of First Lady of Turkey Semra Ozal, wife of President Turgut Ozal, to Los Angeles last week. Turkey is Iraq's neighbor to the north. Semra Ozal was feted widely. On Monday, Sema Emre, wife of Turkish Consul Gen. Mehmet Emre, hosted a tea for 50 at the consulate in Hancock Park.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | THE FASHION STAFF
Wondering why you couldn't cruise down Rodeo Drive Tuesday night? It seems Turkey's First Lady, Semra Ozal, was in town to do a little shopping. Before she could drop into Bijan the street had to be cleared of all traffic and pedestrians. She arrived with a motorcade escort and a phalanx of body guards. Her big purchase consisted of two solid gold guns, at $10,000 each. * CLOSE SHAVE: Linda Silver has discovered how loyal her customers really are.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One image captures many of the contradictions that characterize Turkey's taboo-breaking First Lady, Semra Ozal, and her countrywomen. Wrapped in a white cloth, the wife of Turkish President Turgut Ozal appeared a picture of Muslim modesty during a recent pilgrimage to Mecca. But then she stood shoulder-to-shoulder with her husband, ignoring other Islamic customs by which women should be more deferential.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1990 | NUKET KARDAM, Nuket Kardam, an assistant professor of government at Pomona College in Claremont, spent three weeks in Turkey this summer observing Imren Aykut for her research on women in politics
The crisis in the Persian Gulf may be a disguised blessing for women in the Middle East, where strict cultural and religious norms generally relegate them to traditional, subservient roles. After the Iraqi invasion, Kuwaiti women took to the streets, staging public demonstrations and providing secret relief to resisters. Iraqi women have been recruited into the military. A small group of Saudi Arabian women publicly defied the law to drive their own cars.
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