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Semyon Bychkov

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1991 | SUSAN REITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From Leningrad to Paris by way of Grand Rapids and Buffalo--it is not the most predictable of career routes, but one that has given conductor Semyon Bychkov a steadily rising profile and an impressive reputation on two continents. The 38-year-old Leningrad native, who emigrated to the United States in 1975, is now the music director of the L'Orchestre de Paris, which he brings to Southern California this week with three programs featuring the French duo-pianists Katia and Marielle Labeque.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2013 | By Richard S. Ginell
In the 1980s, when he was in his early 30s, Russian emigré Semyon Bychkov burst onto the scene in a blaze of hype -- recording regularly for Philips, touring with Herbert von Karajan's Berlin Philharmonic.  He is now 60, no longer as loudly touted, yet thinking big in terms of repertoire. Back in 2011, Bychkov and the Vienna Philharmonic blew through Costa Mesa with Mahler's Symphony No. 6; his current guest-conducting schedule is dominated by such epic-scaled blockbusters as Shostakovich's Symphony No. 11, Britten's “War Requiem” and Richard Strauss' “Alpine Symphony.” Falling right into that pattern, Bychkov's agenda with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Friday night contained only one piece, a big one: Bruckner's Symphony No. 8. For this mighty, 82-minute-long, alternately thunderous and hushed cathedral of a piece to begin to make its effect, a conductor should have a tight grip on the structures of the four movements, not letting things drift into fragments in search of a whole.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2013 | By Richard S. Ginell
In the 1980s, when he was in his early 30s, Russian emigré Semyon Bychkov burst onto the scene in a blaze of hype -- recording regularly for Philips, touring with Herbert von Karajan's Berlin Philharmonic.  He is now 60, no longer as loudly touted, yet thinking big in terms of repertoire. Back in 2011, Bychkov and the Vienna Philharmonic blew through Costa Mesa with Mahler's Symphony No. 6; his current guest-conducting schedule is dominated by such epic-scaled blockbusters as Shostakovich's Symphony No. 11, Britten's “War Requiem” and Richard Strauss' “Alpine Symphony.” Falling right into that pattern, Bychkov's agenda with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Friday night contained only one piece, a big one: Bruckner's Symphony No. 8. For this mighty, 82-minute-long, alternately thunderous and hushed cathedral of a piece to begin to make its effect, a conductor should have a tight grip on the structures of the four movements, not letting things drift into fragments in search of a whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
No program that ends with the leaden repetitions of the Symphony in D minor by Cesar Franck can be a total success, but the French agenda offered by the Orchestre de Paris, conductor Semyon Bychkov and duo-pianists Katia and Marielle Labeque at the Orange County Performing Arts Center over the weekend did achieve distinction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
In this century, according to critical tradition, perceived history and long memories, the great French orchestras have come from North America. For a long time, and under the lasting influences of music directors like Pierre Monteux and Charles Munch, the Boston Symphony carried that torch. In recent decades, the flame has been passed to Charles Dutoit and his aptly named Orchestre Symphonique de Montreal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
No program that ends with the leaden repetitions of the Symphony in D minor by Cesar Franck can be a total success, but the French agenda offered by the Orchestre de Paris, conductor Semyon Bychkov and duo-pianists Katia and Marielle Labeque at the Orange County Performing Arts Center over the weekend did achieve distinction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unveiling its 1990-91 season Tuesday, the Orange County Philharmonic Society has become the first performing arts organization to announce specific dates at the new Irvine Theatre. The society's "Festival Series" includes performances at the new, $17.6-million theater at UC Irvine, scheduled to open in the fall, by the Empire Brass (Oct. 26), soprano Dawn Upshaw (Nov. 15), the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1989 | HERBERT GLASS
The simplistic notion that it was all creatively downhill for nearly a half-century after the success of the 19-year-old Dmitri Shostakovich's wildly original First Symphony (1925) is rooted in the widely held feeling that none of his subsequent symphonies could quite equal its cheekiness--he was never 19 again--or its variety of mood. Is he deep? Is he superficial? Is he blatant? Yes, to all.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
Pity poor Prokofiev. His death, which should have made at least the bottom of Page 1 on newspapers worldwide, was barely--and belatedly--acknowledged, both in the Soviet Union and in the West. He had the bad fortune to die on the same day, March 5, 1953, as Josef Stalin. Then, in 1991, when the world should have been honoring his centennial, Sergei Prokofiev's thunder was stolen again--this time by a fellow composer, Mozart, whose bicentennial was getting all the attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
In this century, according to critical tradition, perceived history and long memories, the great French orchestras have come from North America. For a long time, and under the lasting influences of music directors like Pierre Monteux and Charles Munch, the Boston Symphony carried that torch. In recent decades, the flame has been passed to Charles Dutoit and his aptly named Orchestre Symphonique de Montreal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1991 | SUSAN REITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From Leningrad to Paris by way of Grand Rapids and Buffalo--it is not the most predictable of career routes, but one that has given conductor Semyon Bychkov a steadily rising profile and an impressive reputation on two continents. The 38-year-old Leningrad native, who emigrated to the United States in 1975, is now the music director of the L'Orchestre de Paris, which he brings to Southern California this week with three programs featuring the French duo-pianists Katia and Marielle Labeque.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Herbert von Karajan, the colorful and controversial conductor, stepped down Monday as director of the celebrated Berlin Philharmonic, which many consider the world's best. Karajan, an 81-year-old autocratic Austrian, handed a letter of resignation to the West Berlin senator for cultural affairs in Salzburg, Austria. The senator, Anke Martiny, said that Karajan referred in his letter to his increasing spinal disability, declaring: "The results of the medical examinations I have been undergoing for several weeks indicate that I am not in the position to fulfill my duties as I understand them."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Internet radio finally catches on, when we can easily tune into high-quality broadcasts from anywhere in the world, Americans will have cause to be astonished. A number of the great national radio networks in Europe and Asia support major symphony orchestras (as NBC and CBS did in our own dim past). In addition, they support symphonic music as a living art form, persistently programming and commissioning important new work for broadcast.
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