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Sen Alan Cranston

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1986
It's a shame Sen. Alan Cranston was elected again. At 72, it's time to say "enough." But the stupid people who voted for him would do the same if he was laying in a coffin. We need younger men in this state. R. ADKA Los Angeles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2011 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Kam Kuwata, one of California's leading Democratic political strategists and a droll wit whose colorful quotes and keen analyses enlivened many campaigns, was found dead in his Venice condominium Monday. He was 57. Police were called to investigate when family and friends grew concerned after not hearing from Kuwata for several days. The cause of death was not known, but a Los Angeles Police Department spokesman, Sgt. Ron Pickering, said there was no evidence of foul play. Kuwata's death brought an outpouring of shock and fond remembrance from strategists for both major parties, as well as reporters who knew him as both a source and occasional verbal sparring partner.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1986
The news media and the Congress have been critical of military retired pay and yet Sen. Alan Cranston gets an annual pension of $43,196 for serving only eight years as California state controller. The taxpayers of California are being ripped off by the state government pension system, which badly needs revision. C.V. RUZEK Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2001
Sen. Alan Cranston certainly possessed a fierce determination against nuclear weapons (obituary, Jan. 1). He evidenced this to me beginning at a dinner party given by one of his staff aides. As soon as he was introduced to me (a professor specializing in the World War II era), he ignored all the others for over half an hour. Closely he questioned me about books and articles concerning America's dropping atomic bombs on Japan. Afterward, for over a year, we carried on a correspondence about the morality of atomic weaponry, with Cranston asking for more and more historiography.
OPINION
June 22, 1986
After viewing the sorry performance of "Rambling Ron" at the President's last news conference, it is ironic that the very Republican strategists, who are making an issue of Sen. Alan Cranston's age, used loyalty to 75-year-old President Reagan and his programs as a primary litmus test. MARY E. HANSON Whittier
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1991
It was a shock to see Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) sitting on the committee investigating the BCCI scandal. Given his connection with Charles Keating and Lincoln Savings, one cannot justify Cranston. He should resign immediately. BCCI has contributed heavily to many political campaigns. With so many shady characters involved with BCCI, and the regulatory failures by government, we must insist on the highest level of integrity from the investigators. THOMAS D. LECOQ Costa Mesa
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1987
How do you recall a senator? Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) is asking for the dismissal of Harold Ezell, director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service's Western Region (Metro, Oct. 17). Cranston is after publicity. Cranston is suppose to be representing the best programs for the people of California and he is not! Ezell has done more for California than Cranston has done. Let's ask for Cranston's resignation! D.W. KENNEDY South Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1989
Leona Helmsley rips off the taxpayers for $1.2 million. She gets four years in jail and is fined $7.1 million (Part A, Dec. 13). Justice is served. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and his four cohorts rip off the taxpayers for over $1.2 billion in the Lincoln Savings & Loan mess. They continue to serve in Congress, demand tribute for their services, and pass themselves huge pay raises. Justice is definitely not served. Isn't there something wrong here? W.W WELLS Tehachapi
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1989
I hope that every voter in California saw Conrad's cartoon on Sen. Alan Cranston (Nov. 12) "Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The shadow knows!" and read the front-page story ("Bush Hints He May Oust Top Thrift Overseer"), noting that Cranston (D-Calif.) and four other senators received $1.3 million in political contributions from Charles H. Keating Jr., Lincoln Savings & Loan's chairman. The fact that Cranston's intervention with regulators on Lincoln's behalf has resulted in a $2-billion bill to be paid by the taxpayers, will, hopefully, be remembered on election day. Keating deserves to be in jail, and Cranston, most assuredly, does not deserve to be in the U.S. Senate!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1991
Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) may be correct. He said that he disagrees strongly that his behavior was a radical departure from the Senate norm (Nov. 21). After all, there is much evidence that many politicians take large contributions and perform services for specific donors. On a local level, it's a published fact that most of the county supervisors' contributions come from developers and realtors. Actually, what is sad is that it took almost two years for the Senate to take action on Cranston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1991
It was a shock to see Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) sitting on the committee investigating the BCCI scandal. Given his connection with Charles Keating and Lincoln Savings, one cannot justify Cranston. He should resign immediately. BCCI has contributed heavily to many political campaigns. With so many shady characters involved with BCCI, and the regulatory failures by government, we must insist on the highest level of integrity from the investigators. THOMAS D. LECOQ Costa Mesa
OPINION
March 17, 1991
In response to Ellen Hume's column "Cranston: A Sad Tale of a Good Man Gone Wrong" (Opinion, March 3): Hume's condemnation of Sen. Alan Cranston completely misses the point. Clearly, Cranston is one of the few members of the Senate who has vigorously pursued issues of public interest (i.e., California Desert Bill, California Wilderness Act, the ratification of the 1987 Nuclear Arms Treaty, etc.) while also watching out for certain special interests. Most members of Congress do not bother with issues that do not specifically benefit their political constituencies or provide lucrative campaign contributions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990
Two news items, separated by a week in time and by 3,000 miles in distance, really belong together in the minds of readers and observers. From Washington, it was announced that Sen. Alan Cranston holds nearly $565,000 in his campaign coffers, and that while he has not decided what to do with the money, he may use it for his legal defense on ethics charges. A week later, another news story from Burbank reported that an 89-year-old man, despondent over losing $200,000 in savings when American Continental Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial bill to preserve 8 million acres of California desert, much of it in San Bernardino County, stalled in committee Wednesday. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), the bill's sponsor, accused Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) of masterminding a procedural tactic that prevented the Energy and Natural Resources Committee from voting on the bill. Wilson, who was in California campaigning for governor, denied Cranston's charge that he called on Sen. James McClure (R-Ida.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Alan Cranston said Monday that he will introduce legislation, perhaps as early as today, to allow bondholders hurt by the collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan and its parent firm to sue the federal government for negligence in approving the sale of the bonds. The California Democrat, whose political career is jeopardized by the Lincoln scandal, also released a copy of a letter he sent the Justice Department last week asking for help in letting bondholders seek relief from the government.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The General Accounting Office, concluding an inquiry requested by Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.), has found no legal justification for the government to reimburse 22,000 investors who purchased $200 million in now-worthless junk bonds at offices of Lincoln Savings & Loan, officials said Friday.
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