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Sen Alfonse D Amato

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996
Why has Sen. Alfonse D'Amato wasted so much time on Whitewater? He would have much better luck getting Bill Clinton arrested for impersonating a Republican. AARON M. WILCOX Lakewood
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1996
Re "Panel Issues Divided Reports on Whitewater," June 19: It's important to keep the politically motivated Whitewater investigation and the committee report in perspective. During their presidencies, Ronald Reagan and George Bush were implicated by Senate committees in the outright illegal Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages scandal. Reagan narrowly avoided impeachment, thanks to something called "deniability" that he and his minions learned from Richard Nixon. Arguably, Reagan, as president, was guilty of violating the Constitution he was sworn to uphold, and yet he was "forgiven."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1995
Sen. Alfonse D'Amato and the Whitewater investigating committee are spending $25 million of taxpayer funds just to hear witnesses say, "I don't recall." SAM McCARVER Dana Point
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1996
Why has Sen. Alfonse D'Amato wasted so much time on Whitewater? He would have much better luck getting Bill Clinton arrested for impersonating a Republican. AARON M. WILCOX Lakewood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994
Re your editorial "It's Time for Their 'Luck' to End," (June 29): It was interesting to note that of the eight people named as having profited from dealing in IPOs (initial public stock offerings), only one was a Republican, Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (N.Y.). The remaining seven, ranging from Sen. Howard Metzenbaum (Ohio) to House Speaker Tom Foley (Wash.), are all Democrats. How will this impact the Democrats' often-repeated assertion that the Republicans are greedy, coldhearted, fast-buck artists?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994
With no early appointments this sunny June 17, I had the leisure to read The Times more closely than usual, and thus glimpsed what many readers might have dismissed: Nestled like a hummingbird's egg in the very center of Page A4, shielded by splashy shoe ads, multi-column stories and a halftone box, were 4 3/4 inches of an apathetic wire-service report on how that pillar of Republican rectitude, U.S. Sen. Alfonse D'Amato of New York, had scored $37,000...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1996
Re "Panel Issues Divided Reports on Whitewater," June 19: It's important to keep the politically motivated Whitewater investigation and the committee report in perspective. During their presidencies, Ronald Reagan and George Bush were implicated by Senate committees in the outright illegal Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages scandal. Reagan narrowly avoided impeachment, thanks to something called "deniability" that he and his minions learned from Richard Nixon. Arguably, Reagan, as president, was guilty of violating the Constitution he was sworn to uphold, and yet he was "forgiven."
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The interview is going badly. After only five minutes, Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.) already wants to kick a reporter out of his office. He doesn't like the questions, and he sure as hell won't talk about ethics. His own, to be precise. It's a sore subject for a public official whose honesty and integrity have been repeatedly called into question over the years. Now that he's written an autobiography telling his side of the story, D'Amato says, there's no need to rehash the details of his $225,000 book deal.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two Republicans expected to head the House and Senate Banking committees in the new Congress plan intensive investigations into the role of President Clinton in the failed Whitewater real estate venture--inquiries that could become a major headache for the White House. Aides to Rep.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the acts of executive clemency that President Clinton granted as he was leaving the White House, few strike as close to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton as her husband's decision to reduce the prison terms of four New York Hasidic Jews convicted of bilking tens of millions of dollars from the government. Sen. Clinton, New York's Democratic junior senator, has said that in general she was a bystander while President Clinton made his decisions on clemency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1995
Sen. Alfonse D'Amato and the Whitewater investigating committee are spending $25 million of taxpayer funds just to hear witnesses say, "I don't recall." SAM McCARVER Dana Point
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The interview is going badly. After only five minutes, Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.) already wants to kick a reporter out of his office. He doesn't like the questions, and he sure as hell won't talk about ethics. His own, to be precise. It's a sore subject for a public official whose honesty and integrity have been repeatedly called into question over the years. Now that he's written an autobiography telling his side of the story, D'Amato says, there's no need to rehash the details of his $225,000 book deal.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two Republicans expected to head the House and Senate Banking committees in the new Congress plan intensive investigations into the role of President Clinton in the failed Whitewater real estate venture--inquiries that could become a major headache for the White House. Aides to Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994
Re your editorial "It's Time for Their 'Luck' to End," (June 29): It was interesting to note that of the eight people named as having profited from dealing in IPOs (initial public stock offerings), only one was a Republican, Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (N.Y.). The remaining seven, ranging from Sen. Howard Metzenbaum (Ohio) to House Speaker Tom Foley (Wash.), are all Democrats. How will this impact the Democrats' often-repeated assertion that the Republicans are greedy, coldhearted, fast-buck artists?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994
With no early appointments this sunny June 17, I had the leisure to read The Times more closely than usual, and thus glimpsed what many readers might have dismissed: Nestled like a hummingbird's egg in the very center of Page A4, shielded by splashy shoe ads, multi-column stories and a halftone box, were 4 3/4 inches of an apathetic wire-service report on how that pillar of Republican rectitude, U.S. Sen. Alfonse D'Amato of New York, had scored $37,000...
BUSINESS
September 19, 1997 | Associated Press
President Clinton nominated top White House and congressional aides to fill two vacancies on the Securities and Exchange Commission. Paul R. Carey, Clinton's liaison to the Senate, and Laura S. Unger, the securities counsel for the Senate Banking Committee, would need Senate confirmation before taking seats on the commission. Carey, a special assistant to the president since 1993, handles banking, housing, securities and trade issues in his liaison role on Capitol Hill.
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