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Sen Dianne Feinstein

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NATIONAL
August 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California broke her ankle and will skip next week's Democratic National Convention in Denver, she announced. Feinstein, one of Hillary Rodham Clinton's top supporters, was to have chaired the state's delegation. Now, state party chairman Art Torres will do so, the party said. The senator slipped and broke her ankle Friday while walking in a Lake Tahoe forest, she said in a statement.
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NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - This is not Robert Eatinger's first run through a full-blown CIA controversy. But it's his most public ordeal. For most of his career, few outside the world of espionage knew of Eatinger, 56, who has spent 22 years moving up the ranks to become the CIA's top lawyer. But in a scathing speech Tuesday, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, accused him of trying to impede a Senate investigation into a notorious CIA detention and interrogation program that Eatinger had helped manage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1992
Senator-elect Barbara Boxer has instituted a rule that all news media contacts have to go through the press secretary (Dec. 10). Reporters must "commit" to this rule to be afforded cooperation. Sen. Dianne Feinstein has issued similar orders concerning her office. Boxer says this is not to keep the message straight--it's just to be orderly and efficient. Feinstein's office says it's not a gag rule, it's an office procedure. Are you people--oops, sorry--are reporters going to take this lying down?
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A long-simmering dispute between the CIA and its Senate overseers erupted into public view Tuesday when the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee accused the agency of possible crimes and of attempting to intimidate committee staffers investigating the CIA's former use of waterboarding and other harsh interrogation techniques. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the committee chairwoman, said the CIA secretly searched computers used by Senate staffers and might have violated constitutional provisions on separation of powers and unreasonable searches, a federal law on computer fraud and abuse, and a presidential order that prohibits the CIA from domestic searches and surveillance.
OPINION
October 5, 2002
I was perplexed to read the Sept. 29 editorial, "Failing Magic at Disney"--singling out the Walt Disney Co. and its CEO, Michael Eisner, for criticism--because I know the many good things that Disney has done for California. The Anaheim theme park has become one of the great attractions in California; Disney has been one of the few employers that has increased its employment over the last few years; and Disney family and Disney Co. contributions made possible Los Angeles' great new concert venue, the Walt Disney Concert Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998
Re "Feinstein's Aim Is True," editorial, April 1: In all the televised and written news reports that we were exposed to following the tragic incident in Jonesboro, Ark., not one showed anyone from that town calling for stricter laws on firearms. Maybe that's because, unlike The Times and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, people take responsibility for their own actions and do not place blame on inanimate objects. How dare The Times and Feinstein capitalize on this tragic event by furthering their elitist views for stricter gun controls, which only serve to violate the 2nd Amendment and punish law-abiding citizens for the acts of criminals?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1998
Re "Senator, Actors Focus on Bill to Curb Paparazzi," Feb. 16: On a purely human level, it is difficult not to be offended, even appalled, by some of the more vulgar extremes to which certain elements of the paparazzi will go in seeking to satisfy their celebrity-crazed clientele. But the fortunes of movie stars, television personalities, professional athletes and other such pop-culture luminaries derive directly from the fame that they themselves aggressively promote and meticulously cultivate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California's senior U.S. senator, has lent her support to the campaign to defeat Proposition 19, the marijuana legalization measure on the state's November ballot. The prominent Democrat, first elected to the Senate in 1992, signed the ballot argument against the initiative. On Monday, she issued a statement through the opposition campaign calling the measure "a jumbled legal nightmare that will make our highways, our workplaces and our communities less safe."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996
Re "Study Questions Justice System's Racial Fairness" and "Feinstein Unveils Bill to Fight Gangs," Feb. 13: As indicated in the study by the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, the pattern of racial inequality is apparent when it comes to the arrests and convictions of African American males in our nation's inner cities. Yet, Sen. Dianne Feinstein has the audacity to sponsor a bill that would continue this pattern of injustice. Why won't she apply the same fervor and energy to the funding of prevention programs?
OPINION
February 17, 2010
Cities, farmers, fishermen and environmentalists have been waging an exhausting tug of war over water for decades in California, but last fall something unusual happened. All those ropes being tugged by competing interests were woven into something new -- a framework for settling conflicts approved under a package of bills by the Legislature. The agreement might have been a fragile web, but it was a historic one nonetheless. And then, last week, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) fired a cannonball through it. Feinstein announced that she would attach a rider to an upcoming federal jobs bill that would boost water deliveries from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to a vocal agribusiness community in the west San Joaquin Valley.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) offered a full-throated defense of the government's collection of data on billions of American phone calls, saying Wednesday that the National Security Agency's practices have safeguarded the nation without trampling on civil liberties. “What keeps me up at night, candidly, is another attack against the United States. And I see enough of the threat stream to know that is possible,” Feinstein said at a Pacific Council on International Policy dinner in Century City.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Matt Pearce and Michael Muskal
The New York commuter train crash that killed four passengers over the weekend was "preventable," Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said Thursday, pushing for stronger rail safety standards as fallout over the tragedy continued to spread. As the investigation into Sunday's derailment continues, the train's engineer has been suspended without pay, according to Kevin Ortiz, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Transit Authority, which operates the Metro-North train and other commuter lines in New York.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - To advance a cause that has defined her political career, Sen. Dianne Feinstein brought the father of a child killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School to Capitol Hill, where he talked about the last time he saw his first-grader alive. She brought in police officers to press her case against her law-and-order opponents. She made it personal, evoking the time she had sought a pulse on the wrist of San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk, shot seconds before, and found her fingers "in a bullet hole.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Despite its long odds in the full Senate, a federal ban on assault weapons cleared a Democratic-run committee Thursday on a party-line vote. "I've looked at bodies that have been shot with these weapons," the bill's chief sponsor, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, told Senate Judiciary Committee colleagues. "How many times does this have to happen?" The hard work now begins for the California Democrat, who wrote the 1994 assault weapons ban only to see the federal law expire in 2004.
OPINION
December 18, 2012
The 2011 shootings of Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and 18 other people in Tucson didn't move the political needle. This summer's shocking massacre of 12 people in an Aurora, Colo., movie theater was scarcely noticed in the halls of Congress. Yet backers of gun control apparently see signs that the blood-spattered halls of Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., where 20 young children were killed Friday, will finally horrify and appall our nation's leaders enough to prompt action against the tools of mass murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2012 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The federal government cleared the way Thursday for waters off the Northern California coast to become the first marine wilderness in the continental United States, ending a contentious political battle that pitted a powerful U.S. senator against the National Park Service. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar settled the dispute by refusing to extend a permit for a commercial oyster farm operating in Point Reyes National Seashore. Congress designated the area as potential wilderness in 1976 but put that on hold until the farm's 40-year federal permit ended.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For political insiders, the new campaign commercial Sen. Dianne Feinstein began broadcasting Tuesday is likely to be called "Son of Grabber." It contains 10 of the most dramatic seconds ever seen in a campaign ad, showing Feinstein at an emotional news conference shortly after the 1978 assassinations of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. Dubbed "The Grabber" when it was first broadcast during Feinstein's 1990 race for governor, the spot found a permanent place in California political lore when it triggered a dramatic shift in which Feinstein's stumbling campaign leapfrogged over two leading Democratic opponents and won the party's nomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2006 | Rone Tempest and Dan Morain, Times Staff Writers
Sen. Dianne Feinstein easily won a fourth term Tuesday, while an incumbent Central California Republican congressman was locked in a tight race, struggling to withstand the national Democratic wave. Feinstein, 73, handily dispatched former state legislator Richard Mountjoy, a Republican from Arcadia who had raised little money and attracted no national Republican backing of note. "This looks like it's going to be a very good night for people who want a new direction," Feinstein said Tuesday evening, beaming beneath a large "Dianne 2006" banner at Delancey Street, a rehabilitation center in San Francisco.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers on Sunday targeted U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice's talking points about the Sept. 11 attack on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, vowing to find out who changed the original language and why. The incident left four Americans dead, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens. Days later, Rice said the administration's preliminary view was that the attack was a spontaneous reaction to an anti-Islamic video, rather than a planned terrorist attack. But Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Michael McGough
In her uphill campaign against Sen. Dianne Feinstein, Republican Elizabeth Emken, albeit obliquely, has made an issue of Feinstein's age. The senator turned 79 on June 22 and if reelected she would be 85 at the conclusion of one more term. Would that be unusual? Yes, but not unprecedented. In the current Senate, Feinstein is the fifth oldest member. Three senators are 88: Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey and Daniel Inouye and Daniel Akaka of Hawaii. No. 4 is 80-year-old Richard Lugar of Indiana, who was defeated in his bid for renomination in this year's Republican primary.
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